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Alphasite
January 13th, 2018, 05:46 PM
I just got a Kaypro 10. It wouldn't power on so I opened it up. The power cable had come loose during shipping. I also found an SWP 8088 coprocessor board installed. Unfortunately the hard drive fails (the ready light comes on, the system boots, then an error message about a hard drive fault is displayed and the ready light goes out). I've looked and there appears to be two different versions. Based on what I've read I think I have the later version and the disk images from the Maslin archive appear to be for the earlier version. Does anyone have the proper disk images? I'm more interested in running CP/M-86 than MSDOS but would like to have both images.

Here's a photo of the SWP board, the daughterboard, and a close-up showing the shiny 8088 CPU:

42997

42998

42999

The SWP board has 1MB of RAM installed (eight 41256 chips).

The Kaypro 10 motherboard is the older version. If it's compatible I'd like to move it to my Kaypro 10 with the newer motherboard.

VERAULT
January 13th, 2018, 05:51 PM
Just curious, why you want to run CPM/86 when the native CPU is a Z80 which runs CPM natively. Sounds like a very convoluted way of doing what the machine intended on doing in the first place.

Chuck(G)
January 13th, 2018, 06:31 PM
More common than you'd think. Consider, for example, the DEC Rainbow 100. Bill Godbout (Compupro) offered an 8085/8088 combination S100 CPU card.

CP/M-86 is a very different beast from CP/M-80; runs different (and often larger) programs than the 8-bit CP/M.

Alphasite
January 13th, 2018, 06:52 PM
Just curious, why you want to run CPM/86 when the native CPU is a Z80 which runs CPM natively. Sounds like a very convoluted way of doing what the machine intended on doing in the first place.

I have many CP/M-80 systems and a CP/M-68K system but no CP/M-86 systems.

VERAULT
January 13th, 2018, 09:34 PM
I had a dec rainbow 100, got it in the mid early 90's before I even knew what to do with it. Thought the floppy drives looked like the coolest things Id ever seen. I didnt know CP/M or anything about it, ended up throwing the thing out... shame.

krebizfan
January 13th, 2018, 10:04 PM
I had a dec rainbow 100, got it in the mid early 90's before I even knew what to do with it. Thought the floppy drives looked like the coolest things Id ever seen. I didnt know CP/M or anything about it, ended up throwing the thing out... shame.

Unfortunately, unless you had the disks for it, there wasn't much to be done with it. DEC was reluctant to provide information about its special video modes or anything to make programming it easier. DEC marketing was DEC's worst enemy.

The whole concept of the Z80 plus 8086 CP/M system was largely a non-starter. By the time the systems arrived, just about all the software that mattered had already been ported to MS-DOS.

Chuck(G)
January 13th, 2018, 10:19 PM
On the other hand, using the Z80 side as the I/O processor for a 16-bit CPU was pretty canny. For example, the TRS-80 Model 16.

I've often wondered if more CP/M-68K installations were deployed than CP/M-86. It's not as silly a proposition as it sounds--68K was used a lot in instrumentation and industrial applications. CP/M-86 not so much, although it wasn't completely absent.

Alphasite
January 29th, 2018, 05:50 PM
Okay, I now have the installation disks for the CP/M 2.2 drivers and MSDOS but not the CP/M-86 installation disks. I haven't had a chance to verify they are still readable but there's a set of originals and backups so hopefully I'll have a complete set. I also have the installation instructions and apparently I need a different PAL for the universal motherboard. The PAL that's in the Z80 daughterboard is for the K10 with the older motherboard. Does anyone happen to have the equations for the KAY4E PAL or a spare?