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revsdr
March 17th, 2007, 08:28 AM
hello,
im very new to this site, would anyone know where
i can find a rarity list for apple II games?
thanks, stacy

Retromaster
March 17th, 2007, 08:41 AM
GOOGLE IS YOUR FRIEND.

http://www.stageselect.com/games/browsegamelist.asp?btnsubmit=Go&SystemID=25

revsdr
March 17th, 2007, 08:44 AM
yeah i seen that site..it suxs..lol
not all games there have the rarity listed.

Retromaster
March 17th, 2007, 08:47 AM
try anywhere in here:

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Apple+2+game+rarity+list&btnG=Google+Search

revsdr
March 17th, 2007, 08:50 AM
yeah...been through all of them ...and nothing.
closest i found was :
http://gotcha.classicgaming.gamespy.com/menu.htm
but his link to the list is down...

Retromaster
March 17th, 2007, 08:54 AM
There may not be a reliable rarity list anywhere...

Try searching Retro computer game rarity list, instead of apple 2, that might yield results...

Bill_Loguidice
March 17th, 2007, 10:27 AM
It would be tough to even get a partially complete list of titles, let alone a rarity list. It's one thing to do it for an Atari 2600 or even the NES, but when you get into the territory of computers with 10,000+ software titles, it becomes rather prohibitive. With that said, there are good game software reference sites for systems like the C-64, Sinclair Spectrum and Atari 8-bit, but I'm unfortunately not aware of anything similar for the Apple II. Even those sites/projects are not entirely complete.

May I ask what you're trying to specifically find out? Many of us on here collect software and might be able to estimate the rarity/value of items for you (particularly games in my case)...

revsdr
March 17th, 2007, 11:32 AM
yes, i have around 50 games and around 100 other disks i am gonna part with...trying to find out how to price them...
heres some games " everything is floppy disk only"
spider-man by green valley publishing
donalds alphabet chase fun with letters by disney
bill budge pinball construction set by electronic arts
sesame street letter go round by hi tech
jim hensons muppets print kit by hi tech
electric company bagasaurus by hi tech
chipwits by brain power
sneakers by sirus
broadsides by strategic simulations inc
sub battle simulator by epyx
silent service the submarine simmulation by micro prose
zork 1 by infocom
the great american road race by activision
learning with leeper by sierra
laerning to add by spinnaker
the writter by spinnaker
snooper troopers granite point ghost by spinnaker
hardball by accolade
micro illustrator by steven dompier -- koala
alien rain by broderbund software
serpentine by broderbund software
choplifter! by broderbund software
apple the playroom "disk a,b,c,d" by broderbund software
wings of fury by broderbund software
the print shop by broderbund software
where in europe " and usa" is carmen sandiego by broderbund software
crime stopper by hayden software
great games and chess problems by hayden software
one more with the sticker gone its red like the other 2 hayden games
the dark crystal " 2 disks"
designasaurus " 2 disk " build- print- walk a dinosaur by britannica software

that all for now...

Bill_Loguidice
March 17th, 2007, 12:52 PM
To be perfectly frank, collectors normally only care if the game is boxed complete with all original contents. That's when the value rises to something notable. If all you have are disks - even assuming they're the original disks and not copies - you're generally looking at $1 - $3 per disk as a maximum, and on the less desirable stuff like old utilities and non-games, less than $1 per disk in relative value.

For what you listed, assuming they're the original disks, you're probably looking in the $35 range as a rough max. If they're copies, cut that by at least half, say $15 for the lot.

Of that lot, if you had "The Dark Crystal" and "Broadsides" actually boxed, you could probably get around $35 - $50 for each of them depending upon overall condition, just to give you a contrast. The rest of the stuff, if they were actually boxed, would generally fall to roughly 10% - 80% of those figures.

carlsson
March 17th, 2007, 01:15 PM
If they're copies, they are only worth half of what blank floppies would cost. For collectors, copies generally are worth $0.

Of course, some games and other software are more rare than others, and you might get a decent amount of money even if it is not complete. I don't know the Apple II scene well enough to state which those ultra rare titles are, but chances are small that you own a such gold nugget.

As regard to rarity lists, it is difficult enough to give a rarity rating for cartridge based games, which tended to come in smaller numbers than tape and disk based software. I suppose the Apple II doesn't have anything that resembles ROM cartridges, but in the case of e.g. C64 - which is not known as a particular cartridge based system - there are over 400 different cartridges. A great deal may be label/publisher variations though. The VIC-20 also has at least some 180-200 different cartridges, not counting label variations. I don't know the number of tape games (disk games probably can be counted on both hands), but an archive online has 420 titles, of which some are non-games and some may be label variations. Even that figure, some 400-450, perhaps 500 known games on tape is considered too much for someone to maintain a fair rarity list. Then just imagine what it would take to have a list of 10000 titles.

revsdr
March 17th, 2007, 01:30 PM
all them are the original ones...i didnt list the box of coppies i have

revsdr
March 17th, 2007, 02:00 PM
if anyone is interested in them lmk....otherwise i am gonna fleabay them
along with all this other apple stuff.
Apple IIc with power supploy
Disk IIc (5.25")
IIc monochrome (green) monitor with stand

Apple IIe with super serial card and 80col/64K card
IIe Duodisk (5.25")
Color Monitor IIe

800K external 3.5" drive

Apple Ethernet Thin Coax Transceiver
FOCUS Etherlan (Cat5 to ?Appletalk?)

Koala Pad Model 101

Box of Apple II 5.25" disks (games, educational)

Mac SE FDHD, HD does not seem to work
2 20Mb SCSI drives external for Mac - don't boot consistently (I might have the SCSI settings wrong)
Lotus 1-2-3 ver 1.0 for Mac, box, manuals, everything (looks never used!)
Speedlink Mac SE Ethernet adapter (Not sure it works, installed however)

another box of 5.25 and 3.5" apple II and Mac disks

Apple Keyboard (model M0116) and Mouse
Extended Keybord II

Terry Yager
March 17th, 2007, 05:27 PM
I'm no Apple expert, but from what I've seen in the PC & OTPC collecting world, none of what you've listed is truly rare, and at least half are very common. Prob'ly the best way to go is to list them on eBay for $1.00 each, and see what the market will value them at. (This, assuming (as Bill has pointed out), full, mint packages). As with any collectible, it's only worth whatever you can sell it for.

--T

Druid6900
March 17th, 2007, 08:02 PM
I have to agree. Rarity is relative.

For example, I have an almost mint copy of Jazz, a productivity package for the early Macs, with everything that was in the original package. It's fairly rare, basically, because it sucked, BIGTIME.

To the avarage Mac user, who aren't really big on collecting the legacy of the leading edge machine they have on their desk, or stuck in their armpit, and who were used to having their "cutting edge" machine obsoleted by Apple ever six months anyway, it's of no value whatsoever. However, to the few rabid Mac collectors, or, possibly, someone that worked with it at one time, they MAY be tempted to give their eye-teeth for it LOL

What is a rarity to you may just be another box with disks in it to me. The only real benchmark of rarity is what someone else is willing to pay for it.

Unknown_K
March 17th, 2007, 08:30 PM
Rarity is defined as how many were produced compared to how many might still be around (a C64 is not RARE).

Don't confuse collectability to rarity. There were many Amiga 1200's made, good luck finding a stock one on ebay for under $75-100. I have a TokaMac II FX accelerator for a Mac IIfx, the rarest processor upgrade to one of the most highly collected 68K Macs. What is it worth, no idea since I have never seen one on ebay and the only picture of one on the net is mine. There can't be more then 1000 made if that, and who knows if any are still kicking around.