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View Full Version : does anybody know where i can get OLD linux screenshots



kaibab
February 25th, 2004, 10:19 AM
i am talking about round about linux 1.0-4.0 (older than 1996)
it doesn't matter which distro though

vic user
February 25th, 2004, 10:46 AM
You might want to try this site out.

I think Anders posted this link on another thread, and I bookmarked the thing:

http://toastytech.com/guis/index.html

Chris

carlsson
February 25th, 2004, 02:48 PM
Is it impossible to get the actual distribution and install it yourself? Besides, in the very old days I think there basically only was the Linux main distribution, and then came SLG (?), which eventually became Slackware.

But since you say screenshots, you mean some kind of X11 and a particular window manager that came with the oldest distributions? Even the most recent distribution today comes with twm, and if you configure X to run on 640x480 in 256 colours, the desktop should be quite OK to simulate a ten year old product. :D

Blackcube
February 28th, 2004, 04:09 PM
I've still got all my pre-slackware distributions as well as several other 1994-95 distributions. I'm moving in two weeks, so they are all packed at the moment.

Moving is such a PITA. All of the household stuff, my three daughter's stuff, my wife's stuff and my tools, books and collection of almost a hundred assorted computers and workstations. Then there are all of the printers and monitors. I've got 15 19-21" , 14 17" and uncounted smaller monitors alone to carry downstairs and load. I don't trust the moving company and it's only 19 miles across town, but it's still a pain. Hell, I bet there is over a hundred pounds of software CD's alone. And then there is all of the spares - motherboards, simms, hard drives, CD-ROM's, case parts, spare monitors, boards of all types. I never realized how heavy my collection of Sgi boxes is. The Octane weighs around 60 pounds alone. At least there is only 1 Octane, but there are 8 Iris Indigo's, 2 Indigo2's, 2 O2's, 1 Indy and 1 VW320. The NeXT cubes are not light either as are the magnesium cased printers. One other printer is an Apple LaserWriter 8500 - 85 pounds of plastic and metal.

Such is life. Thanks for letting me vent.

James (Thank God for Vioxx and Advil)

Terry Yager
February 28th, 2004, 04:48 PM
Moving is such a PITA.

<snip>

Such is life. Thanks for letting me vent.

James (Thank God for Vioxx and Advil)

Yeah, that's pretty much what happened to my (former) collection. We were forced to move three times in four years (ex-wife's job). Each place we moved into seemed smaller than the last, so with each move, my collection got smaller and the computer museum's grew larger. I've gone from about 150 computers to just a handful. The biggest stuff was probably the first to go; the Tandy Model 16b, Model II with expansion, the Altos 5000, etc. I'm down to mostly portable stuff now, Kaypros, etc.

Oh well, I guess I'm done venting too (for now).

--T

carlsson
February 29th, 2004, 11:31 AM
Oh. I'm about to move in a few months, but to a bigger place so I can bring up my Mac from the basement. The other handful of PC-or-smaller class machines I have are accessible from the desk or a drawer already today. Not planning to extend the collection wildly though.

Blackcube
February 29th, 2004, 12:08 PM
Oh. I'm about to move in a few months, but to a bigger place so I can bring up my Mac from the basement. The other handful of PC-or-smaller class machines I have are accessible from the desk or a drawer already today. Not planning to extend the collection wildly though.

We're moving from a 3300 sqft house to a 1300 sqft apartment. The one car garage is my area. It's almost half the size of my home office at this time. We are tired of outrageous mortgage payments, taxes that have doubled in the five years we have lived here and homeowners insurance that has trippled in five years. By downsizing to an apartment we are cutting our montlhly expenses by 2/3. I can cut back to one job and my wife can give up her second and third job. It's just a pain weeding through everything. We want some spare time to enjoy hobbys and our three daughters before thay grow up without us.

Terry Yager
February 29th, 2004, 01:15 PM
Oh. I'm about to move in a few months, but to a bigger place so I can bring up my Mac from the basement. The other handful of PC-or-smaller class machines I have are accessible from the desk or a drawer already today. Not planning to extend the collection wildly though.

We're moving from a 3300 sqft house to a 1300 sqft apartment. The one car garage is my area. It's almost half the size of my home office at this time. We are tired of outrageous mortgage payments, taxes that have doubled in the five years we have lived here and homeowners insurance that has trippled in five years. By downsizing to an apartment we are cutting our montlhly expenses by 2/3. I can cut back to one job and my wife can give up her second and third job. It's just a pain weeding through everything. We want some spare time to enjoy hobbys and our three daughters before thay grow up without us.

And the best part about apartment living...no lawn to mow!

--T

carlsson
March 2nd, 2004, 05:47 AM
Another benefit with living in an apartment is no pavement (sidewalk) to be responsible to shovel in the winter. Yes, over here a house owner living along a small street has the responsibility to keep the pavement clean, which gets even harder when the plough car has left a big snowplough on the side of the street.

Terry Yager
March 2nd, 2004, 08:34 AM
Good point, carlsson. I hate shoveling snow just as much as mowing the grass.

--T

CP/M User
March 2nd, 2004, 09:22 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Good point, carlsson. I hate shoveling snow
> just as much as mowing the grass.

Boy I'm lucky, I've never had to shovel snow,
it looks like a back breaking job (from what
I've seen of it).

Heh! ;-)
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
March 3rd, 2004, 06:12 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Good point, carlsson. I hate shoveling snow
> just as much as mowing the grass.

Boy I'm lucky, I've never had to shovel snow,
it looks like a back breaking job (from what
I've seen of it).

Heh! ;-)
CP/M User.

Yeah, lucky you! What part of Oz do you live in that doesn't get any snow? (I don't remember my third-grade Geography very well any more).

--T

Blackcube
March 3rd, 2004, 09:18 AM
Good point, carlsson. I hate shoveling snow just as much as mowing the grass.

--T

I've never seen enough snow to try and shovel it, but I really hate working in the yard. You all are right, I'm tired of all of the home maintance issues.

dongfeng
March 3rd, 2004, 11:39 AM
problem with living in an apartment, is difficult to park your car :lol:

Terry Yager
March 3rd, 2004, 02:27 PM
I've never seen enough snow to try and shovel it, but I really hate working in the yard. You all are right, I'm tired of all of the home maintance issues.

Oh yeah, I know what ya mean. (I've lived in Texas, too). 115 in the shade in the Summer, and the worst part of Winter is the occaisional ice-storm. That's when people in cars really go crazy cause nobody knows how to drive on that slick stuff.

--T

CP/M User
March 3rd, 2004, 09:50 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

>>> Good point, carlsson. I hate shoveling snow
>>> just as much as mowing the grass.

>> Boy I'm lucky, I've never had to shovel snow,
>> it looks like a back breaking job (from what
>> I've seen of it).

> Yeah, lucky you! What part of Oz do you live
> in that doesn't get any snow? (I don't
> remember my third-grade Geography very
> well any more).

Come again?

I originally come from Bendigo & now live
obviously in Melbourne. But we do have an
alpine region in the good ol' state of Vic,
which I might add is quite large.

We're not as lucky as Tasmanians though, where
it's been known to snow on Cradle Mountain &
even Mt. Wellington (just out of Hobart) in Summer
time (December). Mt. Wellington one Christmas
had snow on it (falling on Christmas Day!!).

But Aussie weather is up the creek!

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
March 3rd, 2004, 09:55 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Oh yeah, I know what ya mean. (I've lived
> in Texas, too). 115 in the shade in the
> Summer, and the worst part of Winter is the
> occaisional ice-storm. That's when people in
> cars really go crazy cause nobody knows
> how to drive on that slick stuff.

That Grumpy ol' Men movie always cracks me
up & to be honest the Shovelling Snow just
reminded me of it. Especally love the way how
something around them can be so
problematic! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

carlsson
March 4th, 2004, 12:23 AM
I think the most long-lasting winter I have encountered lasted a week into May, and that is on the northern hemisphere then. Fortunately I don't live in that part of the country where one can expect snowfall in late June*, although in the hilly regions it probably can happen.

But vic user is right, finding/renting a parking space can be difficult in the bigger cities, living in an apartment. This reminds me of anyone who has a detached house could put asphalt on the whole yard, and instead of mowing can rent out parking space. How about that, solving two people's problems in one?

*) roughly corresponds to your Christmas Day in the southern hemisphere

CP/M User
March 4th, 2004, 12:54 AM
"carlsson" wrote:

> I think the most long-lasting winter I
> have encountered lasted a week into
> May, and that is on the northern
> hemisphere then. Fortunately I don't
> live in that part of the country where
> one can expect snowfall in late June*,
> although in the hilly regions it probably
> can happen.

Oh I thought you were living up with the
polar bears or something! ;-)

> But vic user is right, finding/renting a
> parking space can be difficult in the
> bigger cities, living in an apartment. This
> reminds me of anyone who has a detached
> house could put asphalt on the whole
> yard, and instead of mowing can rent out
> parking space. How about that, solving two
> people's problems in one?

Oh well, I guess it's the ongoing fascination
people have about living next to lots of
people. Personally, I don't like it, but to get
proper work, you need to live somewhere
big & can find plenty of work.

What the Govt. fail to mention is that a lot of
other people are looking for work in that area
& in a way a competition is being done, in
order to pick the most suitable! Some of the
Job agencies do care, but it's just question of
finding it, with all the other's out there to just
give them work! :-(

> *) roughly corresponds to your Christmas
> Day in the southern hemisphere

Well Tasmania is such a small place (it's that
what looks like an island at the bottom of the
mainland of Australia - just down below
Victoria, to which where I'am). But we get
some funny weather, but nothing as odd as
Snow falling on our Alps on Christmas Day
(in summer). It gets to warm in Victoria! :-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
March 4th, 2004, 07:07 AM
This reminds me of anyone who has a detached house could put asphalt on the whole yard, and instead of mowing can rent out parking space. How about that, solving two people's problems in one?


You don't know how many times I've wished I could do that very thing. (I did have a neighbor once who paved his whole backyard and used it for a basketball court).

--T

Blackcube
March 4th, 2004, 01:16 PM
problem with living in an apartment, is difficult to park your car :lol:

In car crazy Dallas, almost all apartments have either a covered parking area or an attached garage. Ours has a detached one car garage. but I'm rolling out carpet in it to use as an office/geek room. I really wanted the apartment with the two car attached garage, but for some reason my wife chose style and kitchen layout over garage space. :wink: It's really only temporary - we plan to semi-retire to Hawaii in 5-7 years.

mbbrutman
March 6th, 2004, 11:31 AM
I'm actually going in the other direction - from an 1800 sq foot house to a 4500 sq foot house. The new (to me but 17 years old) house is much bigger, but it needs a lot of deferred maintenance. And half of the space is unfinished, so I have a lot of work to do.

On the other hand, I'll finally have enough space for a proper computer room, with enough power, signal wiring, and table-top/workbench space for my machines. I don't have a lot of machines, but I desperately want to work with them more and having to go to closets and storage rooms to swap units is getting old.

I figure I need space to keep 5 or six machines setup, not counting the server boxes I never directly use. Two or three PCjrs, one 386, and if I get some time a Timex Sinclair 1000. :-)

Then again, I don't live in a major city - there is room to spread out here. If I was living in NYC still my hobbies would have to be quite a bit different.

DoctorPepper
March 7th, 2004, 03:27 PM
Another benefit with living in an apartment is no pavement (sidewalk) to be responsible to shovel in the winter. Yes, over here a house owner living along a small street has the responsibility to keep the pavement clean, which gets even harder when the plough car has left a big snowplough on the side of the street.

What is this sidewalk shoveling thing of which you speak? (he says, sitting in his house in sunny Florida ;-) )

Terry Yager
March 7th, 2004, 06:45 PM
On the other hand, I'll finally have enough space for a proper computer room, with enough power, signal wiring, and table-top/workbench space for my machines. I don't have a lot of machines, but I desperately want to work with them more and having to go to closets and storage rooms to swap units is getting old.

Don't worry, your collection will soon expand to completely fill all available space (including closets, basements, attics, garages, etc.). (Isn't that some kinda universal law or sum'n)?

--T

Terry Yager
March 7th, 2004, 06:49 PM
Another benefit with living in an apartment is no pavement (sidewalk) to be responsible to shovel in the winter. Yes, over here a house owner living along a small street has the responsibility to keep the pavement clean, which gets even harder when the plough car has left a big snowplough on the side of the street.

What is this sidewalk shoveling thing of which you speak? (he says, sitting in his house in sunny Florida ;-) )

His moldy house in some swamp in the armpit of America. Seen any good hurricanes lately? (I know...sour grapes!)

--T

TIML
March 18th, 2004, 01:04 PM
How about this one:








$_



Sorry, not funny, I know. I'll go back to sleep now!!!


.T.I.M

ahm
June 15th, 2004, 03:47 PM
Is it impossible to get the actual distribution and install it yourself? Besides, in the very old days I think there basically only was the Linux main distribution, and then came SLG (?), which eventually became Slackware.

SLS -> Soft Landing System

BTW, there are alot of old distros available here:
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/historic-linux/

Terry Yager
June 15th, 2004, 06:18 PM
How about this one:








$_



Sorry, not funny, I know. I'll go back to sleep now!!!


.T.I.M

Here's another:



login&#58; god
password&#58; ******













--T

carlsson
June 16th, 2004, 10:43 PM
So God needs a password to get in? I mean, I thought he was super user enough to only give his username for instant access everywhere. :wink:

Terry Yager
June 16th, 2004, 11:03 PM
Even HE has to be aware of security these days...those pesky lil haxorz are everywhere!

--T

carlsson
June 17th, 2004, 03:54 AM
True, but in the spirit of a powerful admin, he should find ways to punish them severly afterwards. I mean, like only allow them to use hexadecimal numbers when programming or using computers. Or make that octal for an even tougher punishment (?!?).

Terry Yager
June 17th, 2004, 08:28 AM
Heh! Reminds me of that ol' joke: What's the difference between God and a sysadmin? God doesn't think he's a sysadmin! <groan> Sorry, pretty bad. Ok, so if God and a sysadmin got into a fight, who would win? Trick question, sysadmins are God! <more groaning> I know, even worse...

BTW, any good hacker can tell you that the number one most common userid for root is "god", which makes the hacker's life so much easier.

--T

carlsson
June 17th, 2004, 10:31 PM
Funny that you mentioned the password. At the university, the department's main student server was found to have "godjul" (god jul, Merry Christmas) as the root password for a long time until some crackers broke into it and security had to be fixed.

CP/M User
April 25th, 2006, 01:03 AM
CP/M User wrote:

> I originally come from Bendigo & now live obviously
> in Melbourne. But we do have an alpine region in the
> good ol' state of Vic, which I might add is quite
> large.

Actually this brings back classic memories to when I was
living in Bendigo & even when I was up there early June 2004.
Every morning - in Winter time there was this job of getting
the Ice off the Window of the car. When we were living there
it wasn't so bad - cause we had buckets of hot water to get
the ice off quickly.
June 2004 I was up there as part of a senimar which went for
two days. The second morning - yep you guessed it - Ice on the
Window. Except I had no buckets - all I could do was have the
engine running with the heater flat out on the Front window
(which was usually the Window with the most Ice). This took
something like 10 minutes as opposed to 2 - not to mention the
car running flat out! Jack Frost was a favourite up there.

Even had one funny day up there the 1st day of spring in 1995
where it was almost Snowing in Bendigo - quite bizarre!

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
April 25th, 2006, 02:11 AM
Do they have skiing down under, or don't your Alpine slopes get enough powder?

--T

CP/M User
April 25th, 2006, 02:54 AM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Do they have skiing down under, or don't your Alpine
> slopes get enough powder?

Yep. Funnily enough, offically, Australia's tallest Mountain
isn't on the mainland. It's on an Island near the Entartic
called Heard Island. It's also Australia's only currently
Active Volcano - so I guess it stands for good reason as to
why nobody goes there at all. Still it'd be too darn cold for
anyone to go Skiing down it - still might prove a challenge
for someone!

But yeah, on the mainland we have plenty of mountains, some
places are Cross Country skiing (Mt. Buffalo), but we
certainally don't have the slopes you'd find in Europe in the
French Alps, Mt. Kosciusko (the highest mountain on the
mainland) might have some of that kind of thing or Cradle
Mountain in Tasmania.

CP/M User.

ahm
April 25th, 2006, 05:06 PM
SLG (?), which eventually became Slackware.
SLS, the Soft Landing System.

My first distro was SLS 1.03, around October 1993.

Terry Yager
April 25th, 2006, 10:27 PM
I just have this image of Oz as being some kinda sub-tropical 'paradise', interspersed with a fair amount of desert land (and of course, plenty of beaches for surfin' dude)!!!

--T

CP/M User
April 25th, 2006, 11:12 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> I just have this image of Oz as being some kinda sub-
> tropical 'paradise', interspersed with a fair amount
> of desert land (and of course, plenty of beaches for
> surfin' dude)!!!

Nope, it's not all Beaches, tropical weather & desert. Perhaps
what you need is a typical photo of a cold Melbourne morning.
Sure it's not quite as cold as Bendigo & there's other non-
snowed in places, which get colder than that too (Inland New
South Wales for example). Queensland/Northern Territory is
more your tropics - lots of rain in the summer kind of thing,
hot humid & muggy - when even Sydney can be. Melbourne has
it's humid days which can be quite bad too. In fact the
weather is so odd down this neck of the woods it can so easily
be Hot one day & wet & cold the next.

Tasmania is usually cooler as well. Forests with plenty of
ferns - Victoria has some of this too, though it's usually
confined on the mountains, though some ferny based plants are
found near sea level - just depends, usually mountains has
more due to cooler temeratures in which they can survive in.
Tasmania is more or less all over - a little bit like New
Zealand (from what I've seen on travel shows), though New
Zealand has it's own range of plant species which evolved
there.

But from what I've heard Australia is one of the most diverse
countries/contenant's in the world, having just about
everything from desert, tropics & cooler places down south.

CP/M User.