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chuckcmagee
August 1st, 2007, 10:14 PM
جوكندا

Wow, I didn't even know you could do this! Something new everyday.


It's more readable if you bring up the profile.

carlsson
August 1st, 2007, 11:57 PM
I believe it would be translitterated as Adnkwj if read from right to left. Take or give any vowels that I don't understand. Yes, it is fascinating that the forum software allows any HTML entities (and thus full Unicode) in the user names, but why not?

chuckcmagee
August 2nd, 2007, 12:39 AM
One of those deals you never think about until Whoa, what's that?

atari2600a
August 2nd, 2007, 01:16 AM
I'm used to it, happens all the time in YTMND comments. Also I'm on alot o Japanese websites so I'm used to that too.

carlsson
August 2nd, 2007, 01:56 AM
You're used to Arabic speaking people on Japanese websites? ;-)

There are a number of interesting vintage Arabic computers, in particular a couple of MSX and MSX2 computers that tend to be quite a bit collectable: Al Alamiah, but also versions from Casio, Daewoo, Hitachi and so on. On Dimitri Kokken's auctions the other year, he even had an Atari 65XE and an Enterprise 64 in Arabic versions...

atari2600a
August 2nd, 2007, 07:59 AM
Not arabic, but anything in the unicode character library thingy™.

CP/M User
August 4th, 2007, 04:21 PM
carlsson wrote:

There are a number of interesting vintage Arabic computers, in particular a couple of MSX and MSX2 computers that tend to be quite a bit collectable: Al Alamiah, but also versions from Casio, Daewoo, Hitachi and so on. On Dimitri Kokken's auctions the other year, he even had an Atari 65XE and an Enterprise 64 in Arabic versions...

Do you know if those machines would of had more memory as a result of the language transcript? (Only mention this cause one of the Amstrad CPC464s had more memory - 72k I believe, though this came about due to some regulation that machines which don't come with accents inbuilt had to have more memory - unsure! )-:

carlsson
August 4th, 2007, 05:28 PM
I think the Arabic ones etc rather would have switchable ROM sets than more RAM. Of course, if you count the total amount of ROM, you can say it got more memory even if only a part of it can be used at a time.

Regarding the CPC 472, it was only sold in Spain due to a regulation: computers with up to 64K RAM were required to be localized in the Spanish language, including the keyboard and screen messages. Therefore Amstrad added 8K of RAM that is unaccessible to bypass the regulation... However, later the regulation was changed to include all computers, no matter how much RAM they had, so therefore it exists localized Amstrads as well.

A rather tough decision by the Spanish really, to enforce that all home (?) computers sold within the country should be in Spanish. I wonder how many brands who didn't establish themselves for that reason, given how much work and costs it would be to localize the computer. On the other hand, if this regulation was effective from circa 1985, most smaller brands had already dropped out of the market and only the bigger names remained. Computers such as IBM PC, Apple Macintosh, Commodore Amiga, Atari ST and so on probably were easier to localize as they all have plenty of RAM and most of the operating system (and fonts?) is loaded from disk. Add a few symbols on the keyboard, and off you go. Smaller, mostly ROM based 8-bit computers I suppose were more work to adapt both character and OS ROMs, plus keyboard of course.