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carlsson
May 3rd, 2004, 03:41 AM
Since I was bored at work, I tried to come up with some anagrams on "Vintage Computer Forum" (I left out the "The", but if someone wants to include in your anagrams, you're welcome).

It was difficult to get some really meningful anagrams, but these five are the ones I've come up with so far:

Tumor Fungi Move Carpet (sounds quite weird)
Picture of Magnum T. Rover (whoever that is)
Foot Pervert - I C U, Magnum! (oh, now we know!)
Fuego Carnivore Putt MM (a meat-eating golfer on fire?)
Micro PET Goat Fur Nevum (I think nevum is latin for a birth mark?)

Does anyone else want to play? Neither of these five is very descriptive when it comes to what the forum is about.

CP/M User
May 4th, 2004, 03:17 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> Since I was bored at work, I tried to come up with some
> anagrams on "Vintage Computer Forum" (I left out the
> "The", but if someone wants to include in your anagrams,
> you're welcome).

> It was difficult to get some really meningful anagrams,
> but these five are the ones I've come up with so far:

> Tumor Fungi Move Carpet (sounds quite weird)
> Picture of Magnum T. Rover (whoever that is)
> Foot Pervert - I C U, Magnum! (oh, now we know!)
> Fuego Carnivore Putt MM (a meat-eating golfer on fire?)
> Micro PET Goat Fur Nevum (I think nevum is latin for a
> birth mark?)

> Does anyone else want to play? Neither of these five
> is very descriptive when it comes to what the forum
> is about.

I usually don't have time for this, but here's one I guess.

Age Input
Vertigo ain't he
Computer Vintage

Na, I can't quite get the hang of this! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

carlsson
May 5th, 2004, 08:17 AM
Looks more like a haiku than an anagram (or maybe that was the intent). Good attempt through.

Erik
May 5th, 2004, 08:28 AM
An anagram has to use all of the letters, right?

E

vic user
May 5th, 2004, 11:01 AM
Here is a neat site I found on anagrams Erik.

Some really cool examples.

Man, some people are really good at this.

Chris

CP/M User
May 5th, 2004, 02:12 PM
"Erik" wrote:

> An anagram has to use all of the letters, right?

According to my dictionary it doesn't have to. Which is
why I felt that my terms were valid.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
May 5th, 2004, 02:19 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> Looks more like a haiku than an anagram (or maybe
> that was the intent). Good attempt through.

Looks more like a what than an anagram? Didn't I do that
right. Crikey if they wish to make these puzzles right, I
might as well crawl up & die! :-(

As I said to Erik, there's no mention about an Anagram
using all the letters which use up a word, unless you call
taking a sentence or word & changing the order of letters
into another word or sentence

CP/M User.

carlsson
May 6th, 2004, 11:13 PM
Ok, maybe you don't have to use all the letters, but it gets more like a challenge to find use for them all.

A haiku is a kind of Japanese poetry, which normally is built up by using a fixed set of syllables on each line. There is discussion about how many syllables one should use, and since Japanese doesn't translate well into Western countries, one cannot follow the original ruleset anyway.

Often a haiku poem is built by 3+5+3 syllables or IIRC from school, we used 5+5+7+9+3+3 for a longer form.

CP/M User
May 6th, 2004, 11:35 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> Ok, maybe you don't have to use all the letters, but it gets
> more like a challenge to find use for them all.

Well I'm not too sure, I'm only going by what the Dictionary
said. Perhaps it's just talking about what Anagram means
without going into the rules about the game.

It might be like looking for the term for Chess. A dictionary
would give you a rough idea about it or the object, but it
wouldn't explain the rules of the game (that's why you'd go
to a book about Chess & see what that has to say). For
example a dictionary wouldn't tell you where you can move
your king, queen, bishop, pawn or whatever. Each of those
pieces can only move in a certain position.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 7th, 2004, 04:20 AM
Ok, maybe you don't have to use all the letters, but it gets more like a challenge to find use for them all.

A haiku is a kind of Japanese poetry, which normally is built up by using a fixed set of syllables on each line. There is discussion about how many syllables one should use, and since Japanese doesn't translate well into Western countries, one cannot follow the original ruleset anyway.

Often a haiku poem is built by 3+5+3 syllables or IIRC from school, we used 5+5+7+9+3+3 for a longer form.

I always thought it was 5, 7, 5, for a total of 17 syllables. (Here's some of what google came up with):



Definitions of haiku on the Web:

A Japanese poem composed of three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Haiku often reflect on some aspect of nature.
www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0903237.html


an unrhymed poetic form, Japanese in origin, that contains seventeen syllables arranged in three lines of five, seven, and five syllables, respectively.
www.wwnorton.com/college/english/litweb/glossary_gh.htm


brief poem of seventeen syllables
www.nps.gov/efmo/parks/glossary.htm


(plural: Haiku, from archaic Japanese Haikai): A poetic form derived from Japanese literature. The haiku traditionally consists of three lines. The first line contains five syllables, the second line contains seven, and the last line five. The traditional subject-matter is a description of a location, natural phenomona, or wildlife, which is described in a poetic manner without authorial commentary or moral judgment explicitly stated. More information will be forthcoming.
guweb2.gonzaga.edu/faculty/wheeler/lit_terms_H.html


A haiku is a Japanese poem having three unrhymed lines of five, seven, and five syllables. Traditionally it concerns nature, the seasons, or an aspect of the natural world.
community.middlebury.edu/~asantolu/glossary.htm


a three-line, seventeen syllable form usually about nature.
www.writefromhome.com/writingtradearticles/197.htm


Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that does not rhyme. Haiku poetry always has three lines of verse, with strict rules on the numbers of syllables for each line. The first line has five, the second line has seven, and the last line has five syllables.
164.109.43.23/GEP/documents/oth/teamlyc/glossary.htm


I have never heard of any other form before. (Here's one of mine, untitled):


Electric dildo,
masturbating vibrator.
She loves her machine

--T

dongfeng
May 7th, 2004, 09:47 AM
Yes, Haiku is usually 5-7-5 syllable, but must be 17 in total. Also, you are not allowed to use similies and metaphors.

Most famous for Haiku, is Basho, who died in 1694.

carlsson
May 7th, 2004, 10:18 AM
Oh well. I knew it was prime numbers, but counted a few too less. I wonder where that longer form we used in school came from.

How about this one then, based on what CP/M User wrote before?

Input from great age
RAM not working, vertigo
Computer vintage

Rather sad one, considering it doesn't hold its memory contents anymore.

Terry Yager
May 7th, 2004, 11:03 AM
How about this one then, based on what CP/M User wrote before?

Input from great age
RAM not working, vertigo
Computer vintage



Good one, carlsson! (Sounds like a couple of my vintage machines).

--T

CP/M User
May 7th, 2004, 03:10 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

>> How about this one then, based on what CP/M User
>> wrote before?

>> Input from great age
>> RAM not working, vertigo
>> Computer vintage

> Good one, carlsson! (Sounds like a couple of my
> vintage machines).

Next, you'll be playing games like what can abbreviated
terms stand for? You know, like IIRC or IMHO! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 7th, 2004, 07:08 PM
Next, you'll be playing games like what can abbreviated
terms stand for? You know, like IIRC or IMHO! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Or mebbe we're due for a limerick thread. There was a young lady from Kent...

--T

carlsson
May 10th, 2004, 05:48 AM
Here is one haiku particulary for vic_user and dongfeng:

**** COMMODORE BASIC ****
Three point five kilobyte free
?Out of memory

(don't read out the asterisks or question mark)

vic user
May 10th, 2004, 06:43 AM
My mind must be going, or I need more coffee.

I was just reading Anders' Commodore haiku, and thought at first it was an anagram, and was trying to rearrange the letters :oops:

Chris

carlsson
May 10th, 2004, 10:55 PM
Maybe combining different art forms (if anagrams can be called a form of art) is as improper as they say it is to combine different drugs; the results are unpredictable and possibly lethal.

CP/M User
May 11th, 2004, 12:44 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

>> Next, you'll be playing games like what can abbreviated
>> terms stand for? You know, like IIRC or IMHO! ;-)

> Or mebbe we're due for a limerick thread. There was a
> young lady from Kent...

Can't say I'm familiar with a limerick thread. What does
that involve?

Cheers,
CP/M User.

vic user
May 11th, 2004, 02:25 AM
Can't say I'm familiar with a limerick thread. What does
that involve?

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Probably something like...

"There once was a man from Nantucket"

and then you do the next line ;)

chris

CP/M User
May 11th, 2004, 03:48 AM
"vic user" wrote:

>> Can't say I'm familiar with a limerick thread. What does
>> that involve?

> Probably something like...

> "There once was a man from Nantucket"

> and then you do the next line ;)

OHHHHHHH, A lymerick?

In that case it's, "who decided to move to Kentucky" ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 11th, 2004, 06:24 AM
Kentucket?
Oh well, here goes:

But the natives down there,
Have lost all thier hair,
And are going to Hell in a bucket!

--T

carlsson
May 11th, 2004, 06:59 AM
This is neither an anagram, a haiku nor a limerick:

Satan oscillate my metallic sonatas

vic user
May 11th, 2004, 08:47 AM
This is neither an anagram, a haiku nor a limerick:

Satan oscillate my metallic sonatas

Any hints on what it is, or is it just gibberish?

I was wondering if it was one of your Japanese translation things, but it does not look like one.

Chris

Terry Yager
May 11th, 2004, 09:00 AM
It's one of those things...uuummmn...whaddayacallit? It's spelled the same way front-wards as back-wards.

--T

Erik
May 11th, 2004, 09:14 AM
Palindrome

E

Terry Yager
May 11th, 2004, 09:30 AM
Yeah, that's it...palindrome. TNX Erik. (That would've bugged me all afternoon...)

--T

CP/M User
May 12th, 2004, 03:48 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Kentucket?

Well it seemed to sound better than New York! :-)

> Oh well, here goes:

> But the natives down there,
> Have lost all thier hair,
> And are going to Hell in a bucket!

"Hell in a bucket?", Home sounds more cozy (unless
you like extreme heat! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
May 12th, 2004, 03:58 AM
"carlsson" wrote:

> This is neither an anagram, a haiku nor a limerick:

But that last one was a haiku, right?

> Satan oscillate my metallic sonatas

That's a pretty long palindrome, can they be more than
one word? Just wonderning - I guess not, since it's a
sentense spelt the same way frount or back. If
Palindrome is a word spelt the same way frount or back
& it's crtical that it must be a word, then the words here
would have to be spelt frount or back - so palindromes
is out. I don't know, it's just I learned this as school as
a palindrome was a word, but a sentence, I'm not so
sure what that one is, or if there's one (maybe there
should be a world for it?).

Cheers,
CP/M User.

carlsson
May 12th, 2004, 04:32 AM
Yep, it was a palindrome which I strongly believe can and maybe even should be a "complete" sentence. I once picked that one up from a review of a football game in a computer magazine.

I believe anagrams and palindromes can mix, thus you rearrange the letters of something into a new word or sentence which can be read backwards as well. It will not work with all input sentences and be rather difficult.

CP/M User
May 12th, 2004, 04:51 AM
"carlsson" wrote:

> Yep, it was a palindrome which I strongly believe can and
> maybe even should be a "complete" sentence. I once picked
> that one up from a review of a football game in a computer
> magazine.

> I believe anagrams and palindromes can mix, thus you
> rearrange the letters of something into a new word or
> sentence which can be read backwards as well. It will not
> work with all input sentences and be rather difficult.

Okay, I won't argue with that, if that's the way it is, then that's
the way it is.

I thought it would sound more logical to have two varients
which are a like (in this case a word or sentence spelt the
same both ways), to have a simular word since they have
simular meaning. It just seems like another win to myself
in my theory about the English language been too vague! ;-)

But since I'm not the one controlling it, it's not my problem!
;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
April 25th, 2006, 01:31 AM
carlsson wrote:

> Since I was bored at work, I tried to come up with
> some anagrams on "Vintage Computer Forum" (I left out
> the "The", but if someone wants to include in your
> anagrams, you're welcome).

Tell you another game which really hits the spot - is Suduko.
It has various difficulty levels - cause I've only solved the
Easy, Medium & some Hard ones as well - not difficult or
Fiendish. Medium I seem to get the most out of at the moment
(or Hard - occasionally it's a bit too hard for some reason).
Once you know how to play it though it's quite addictive -
well for myself it is anyway. Trouble is you need a simulator
which makes these games up! :-(

CP/M User.

carlsson
April 25th, 2006, 06:38 AM
I absolutely loathe Suduko.

CP/M User
April 29th, 2006, 03:40 PM
carlsson wrote:

> I absolutely loathe Suduko.

Yeah, why is that?

Just wondered.

CP/M User.

carlsson
April 30th, 2006, 05:39 AM
Place numbers in rows, so each number is only used once in each row, column and 3x3 space. Yet there is no rule about the sum of each row or square has to be equal. To me it looks like a half broken Magic square game, something that has been around for 25+ years and much more. It is also said that after a while you learn a strategy how to solve even the hardest puzzles, and then it grows boring and repetitive. I prefer a traditional crossword - perhaps a crypto - where you seem to use the brain in a more creative way.

CP/M User
April 30th, 2006, 02:36 PM
carlsson wrote:

> To me it looks like a half broken Magic square game,
> something that has been around for 25+ years and much
> more. It is also said that after a while you learn a
> strategy how to solve even the hardest puzzles, and
> then it grows boring and repetitive. I prefer a
> traditional crossword - perhaps a crypto - where you
> seem to use the brain in a more creative way.

Oh okay, I've only been playing it for a couple of months
myself - the easy ones I get done in 10 minutes. Medium
puzzles I get more pleasure from - sometimes I can do them
around 40 minutes to an hour. But I've also worked out some
hard ones. After that their difficult which are too hard (it's
funny though cause I've solved some hard ones & then there's
other hard ones which are too hard). A friend of mine though
does the extermely difficult ones though - and it's
interesting to note that, that's all they like to do. I guess
even those will become to easy over time. I wonder how
difficult it would be if they had just one number on the whole
board - stuck dead centre of it! Guess if you could do that
you a genuine code breaker! ;-)

CP/M User.