PDA

View Full Version : BASIC book and 5.25 drive



NathanAllan
May 12th, 2004, 11:06 PM
I just picked up the highly rumored and much coveted The BASIC Handbook by David A. Lien!! It might seem novice to some of you guys but I have always wanted to learn BASIC and how to use a different computer (my toshiba laptop) to write the programs conveniently and wherever I want, and to learn it!! So I am gonna be studying this old book that I got for a quarter and hopefully transferring abunch of programs from pc-C128 soon!

Also, I was wrestling with a 5.25 drive, trying to get it to run in mymai machine but it just wouldn't work. Regardless of wht I did, soemthing weird happened (the weirdest thing being an "F" drive showing up). Someone told me that some drives are just not suited for dos-based machines (liek mine) and the OS (win9x) just won't like them. So I got a still supported drive, a TEAC fd-55gfr and am gonna see what happens. If that doesn't work then I'm gonna rig up a 486 to run all the hardware that I would like to run but don't have room/slots/irq's/resources for. Have it on the network just to host hardware, maybe a external modem for the network?? Who knows. I have enough hardware to deal with it all (since I can't GIVE it away, sheesh!) so might as well put it to use. Any ideas from anyone?? :)

This might belong in the rants section, but since it's on topic I put it here.

Nathan

CP/M User
May 13th, 2004, 05:01 AM
"NathanAllan" wrote:

> I just picked up the highly rumored and much coveted "The
> BASIC Handbook" by David A. Lien!! It might seem novice
> to some of you guys but I have always wanted to learn
> BASIC and how to use a different computer (my toshiba
> laptop) to write the programs conveniently and wherever
> I want, and to learn it!! So I am gonna be studying this old
> book that I got for a quarter and hopefully transferring
> abunch of programs from pc-C128 soon!

What I think about BASIC is illrelevant. Anyone from a C,
Assembly or Forth background could just as well say the
same thing about my language.

> Also, I was wrestling with a 5.25 drive, trying to get it to
> run in mymai machine but it just wouldn't work.
> Regardless of wht I did, soemthing weird happened (the
> weirdest thing being an "F" drive showing up). Someone
> told me that some drives are just not suited for dos-based
> machines (liek mine) and the OS (win9x) just won't like
> them. So I got a still supported drive, a TEAC fd-55gfr and
> am gonna see what happens. If that doesn't work then I'm
> gonna rig up a 486 to run all the hardware that I would
> like to run but don't have room/slots/irq's/resources for.
> Have it on the network just to host hardware, maybe a
> external modem for the network?? Who knows. I have
> enough hardware to deal with it all (since I can't GIVE it
> away, sheesh!) so might as well put it to use. Any ideas
> from anyone?? :)

Sorry, all I can say is whenever the hardware is funny (not
standard), then problems can arrise. I've got one machine
which doesn't like disk drives being removed with the BIOS
being changed for it (I think), as a result, changing it failed
the Hard Disk from booting, hence no way of accessing my
BIOS setup program on it, which just mean't I had to
change it back & since I could be bothered I didn't do
anything after that (but the machines back booting from the
Hard Disk, which is good) & I found alternatives to solve a
particular problem.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 13th, 2004, 05:02 AM
Which dialect of BASIC are you learning? I think I have some IBM-PC/GW-BASIC books around here somewhere (in storage?). I know I have a very basic BASIC book here, by Rodney Zaks, that tries to be as generic as possible. (Zaks, as a computer writer, is at least as well-known as Lien. His Z80 book is affectionately known among Z80 programmers as "The Bible"). Anyways, if you want the GW-BASIC book(s), you're welcome to them for the cost of postage (provided I can dig them up). They do me no good as I have never been able to grok BASIC much anyways). The Zaks book you can have for $3.00 + postage, as it's somewhat collectable, even in the (rough) shape mine is in.

My method of transfering software among different media is to use a separate machine, a '386 luggable which doesn't take up much space when not in use, and can be quickly set up and taken down again when no longer needed. Works for me.

--T

NathanAllan
May 13th, 2004, 09:37 PM
What I have on my laptop is GW-BASIC and QBASIC. I would like to get a few others but that's what I have right now. I also am gonna try my hand at commodore basic, on my C128. Wht I'd like to do is make this little game, Dungeon Crawl, work on the C128. It's a Rogue-like game. Other things too, but that'll be my experiment.

Nathan

CP/M User
May 13th, 2004, 10:38 PM
"NathanAllan" wrote:

> What I have on my laptop is GW-BASIC and QBASIC.
> I would like to get a few others but that's what I have
> right now.

You might be interested in this site then (if you want other
DOS based BASICs) :-

http://cpm.interfun.net/cpm.html

Check the PCDOS section & there's a couple of basics
there CBASIC86 is one of them.

There's also one in Simtel, but I dare I say it, GW-BASIC
& QBASIC (& perhaps PowerBASIC) are the best of the
bunch. Oh wait, there's one here:-

http://www.azillionmonkeys.com/qed/dos.html

BAS286 I think that's called (it's a compiler & freeware
for memory!)

This looks good too (if you're interested! ;-)

http://www.compilers.net/Dir/Free/Compilers/Basic.htm

Cheers,
CP/M User.

carlsson
May 14th, 2004, 06:20 AM
I've had the Swedish translation (!) of David A. Lien's BASIC Handbook in the bookshelf for 15-20 years or so. Is it valuable? :)

Btw, how many people think that the middle initial was "taken" in his name? David Alien, if you see what I mean.

Terry Yager
May 14th, 2004, 08:58 AM
I've had the Swedish translation (!) of David A. Lien's BASIC Handbook in the bookshelf for 15-20 years or so. Is it valuable? :)

Btw, how many people think that the middle initial was "taken" in his name? David Alien, if you see what I mean.

Is he a LGM or a BEM?

--T

NathanAllan
May 15th, 2004, 04:15 PM
I looked this book up and found it is NOT very valuable except to someone who is going to use it. Here's a good site to have:

http://www.fetchbook.info/

Like google for books. Least price was $3.50 and most was $17.20. So it's considered a dollar book. I like my copy though, heh heh.

Nathan

Terry Yager
May 15th, 2004, 05:25 PM
Kewl link! Found a copy of Mitchell Waite's CP/M Bible for three buck$. TNX Nathan.

CP/M User,

They have another for you at the same price.

--T

CP/M User
May 15th, 2004, 06:48 PM
"NathanAllan" wrote:

> I looked this book up and found it is NOT very
> valuable except to someone who is going to use
> it. Here's a good site to have:

> http://www.fetchbook.info/

Geez, great site, how did you come across this one?

Cheers,
CP/M User.

NathanAllan
May 15th, 2004, 07:33 PM
Glad you found it useful! My wife and friend of mine are actually kind of in the book trade and they get frequent requests for stuff including books that are sometimes hard to find. I only use it sometimes, and use the url to buy a book and resell it later locally. People around here do NOT know how to use the internet. I am gonna post this in the links section since it seems to be useful for people here.

Nathan

carlsson
May 17th, 2004, 10:59 AM
Oi. The 1981 edition of the Basic handbook can be had for $0.01 at Amazon, so I guess it is not valuable at all... but of course my copy is a translated one which may put things in a different price level? :roll:

vic user
May 17th, 2004, 01:28 PM
I don't know if you know of this place Nathan, but 'qbasic.com' is a great site.

lots and lots of stuff there.

chris

CP/M User
May 17th, 2004, 01:31 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> Oi. The 1981 edition of the Basic handbook can be
> had for $0.01 at Amazon, so I guess it is not
> valuable at all... but of course my copy is a
> translated one which may put things in a different
> price level?

WHA?!? 1 cent. If they put it on Ebay, then their
guaranteed to double that price! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

carlsson
May 17th, 2004, 10:33 PM
Yes, maybe eBay:ed books get higher bids if there is noone there to tell the bidders where they can shop second hand. Also, I don't know how individuals or companies selling through Amazon works, if that is some auction style or direct buys. In either case, the shipping would cost more than what you pay for the book.

Rick Ethridge
May 18th, 2004, 07:59 AM
I just picked up the highly rumored and much coveted The BASIC Handbook by David A. Lien!! It might seem novice to some of you guys but I have always wanted to learn BASIC and how to use a different computer (my toshiba laptop) to write the programs conveniently and wherever I want, and to learn it!! So I am gonna be studying this old book that I got for a quarter and hopefully transferring abunch of programs from pc-C128 soon!

Also, I was wrestling with a 5.25 drive, trying to get it to run in mymai machine but it just wouldn't work. Regardless of wht I did, soemthing weird happened (the weirdest thing being an "F" drive showing up). Someone told me that some drives are just not suited for dos-based machines (liek mine) and the OS (win9x) just won't like them. So I got a still supported drive, a TEAC fd-55gfr and am gonna see what happens. If that doesn't work then I'm gonna rig up a 486 to run all the hardware that I would like to run but don't have room/slots/irq's/resources for. Have it on the network just to host hardware, maybe a external modem for the network?? Who knows. I have enough hardware to deal with it all (since I can't GIVE it away, sheesh!) so might as well put it to use. Any ideas from anyone?? :)

This might belong in the rants section, but since it's on topic I put it here.

Nathan

I put a 5.25 drive from a Gateway 486 tower in my testbed 266 K6 computer. Win2000 picks it up just fine! My plans are to use it for my TRS-80 emulator. I can make perfect copies of disks that will run in the "real thing". I did that with LS-DOS 6.3.1 successfully. It should work well with my C=128 and 1571/1581 drives to transfer files with BIG BLUE READER for use on my PLUS/4 computer. RLE

Rick Ethridge
May 18th, 2004, 08:05 AM
[quote="NathanAllan"]I just picked up the highly rumored and much coveted The BASIC Handbook by David A. Lien!! It might seem novice to some of you guys but I have always wanted to learn BASIC and how to use a different computer (my toshiba laptop) to write the programs conveniently and wherever I want, and to learn it!! So I am gonna be studying this old book that I got for a quarter and hopefully transferring abunch of programs from pc-C128 soon!


I have that book and many others that pertain to programming on the TRS-80 computer family. You'll find that converting from RS dialect BASIC to Commodore BASICs can be a daunting task! The peeks, pokes, special features and screen size can be difficult. I've done it but it's very time consuming! RLE

Terry Yager
May 24th, 2004, 12:59 PM
Recieved my book I ordered (Amazon) via the link above. It arrived in good, usable condition, but if anyone is looking for books in collectable condition, you might do better to shop eBay, or some other place where a discription of the book's condition is available. I'm not complaining, mind you, the book I recieved is well worth the $3 I paid for it. I'm not picky about this p'ticular book because I wanted a working copy for everyday use, not necessarily a mint-condition collectable, and this certainly fits the bill, even though it contains some writing, a couple of creases, etc.
It's still a great site, but let the buyer be warned: You get what you pay for. If you're looking for a high-end copy, expect to pay the high-end price. I have noticed a great discrepancy in the prices of some of the books I've looked up there. Some titles range in price from a couple of buck$ up into the 60's and 70's, and I have to assume that condition is a factor in those.

--T

NathanAllan
May 24th, 2004, 02:42 PM
I guess I should have said, 'great place to get old books' instead of just books. Working copies, but like said above not mint condition collector copies. Though in my case, I thought I was buying a beater and got a near-mint copy of 1001 Things to Do With Your Commodore 128 for $9 when every place I checked they had copies for around $25 and up. Near mint and first edition. Not that that means anythign to me, I wanted a beater, actually.

I wish I have had time to devote to converting at least a couple of programs but so far not. Every minute I am not busy doing something I am dead-tired. I wanna know baouthtose peeks and pokes, heh heh.

Nathan

Terry Yager
May 24th, 2004, 03:37 PM
The copy I recieved is certainly in better shape than the one at our local public library, which I have been waiting several years hoping to find in thier semi-anual used book sale. In the last 4 years, it has been checked out exactly 4 times, by yours truly each time. Now I don't have to wait for them to retire it, I have one of my own. Not an un-satisfied customer...

--T

carlsson
May 24th, 2004, 10:50 PM
My local library once had a copy of "Inside 1541" (or some of other books describing the famous Commodore disk drive), which I borrowed. One day it was gone - erased from the search system! I suppose they sold it for $1 or even threw it away which was a great shame, considering all the technical goodies the book contains. It was in a rather dull condition though, so I can see if the library thought it was time to get rid of 15 year old computer books about a retired system.

CP/M User
May 25th, 2004, 02:38 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Recieved my book I ordered (Amazon) via the link
> above. It arrived in good, usable condition, but if
> anyone is looking for books in collectable condition,
> you might do better to shop eBay, or some other
> place where a discription of the book's condition is
> available. I'm not complaining, mind you, the book
> I recieved is well worth the $3 I paid for it. I'm not
> picky about this p'ticular book because I wanted a
> "working" copy for everyday use, not necessarily a
> mint-condition collectable, and this certainly fits the
> bill, even though it contains some writing, a couple
> of creases, etc.

> It's still a great site, but let the buyer be warned:
> You get what you pay for. If you're looking for a
> high-end copy, expect to pay the high-end price.
> I have noticed a great discrepancy in the prices of
> some of the books I've looked up there. Some titles
> range in price from a couple of buck$ up into the 60's
> and 70's, and I have to assume that condition is a
> factor in those.

That's nothing. You should try buying it via an Amazon
Auction, which has this a 3rd party seller offerning the
book. Never again will I trust those beggers, who take
your money & give you nothing (cause they don't have
it). They don't even send a refund to the address they
obtain.

Sure eBay you have this voting system, but IMO, you
get what you paid for & 3 dollars sounds fair for what
you got!

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 25th, 2004, 03:20 AM
Oh yeah, I'm not complaining. I'm very satisfied with my purchase.

--T

CP/M User
May 26th, 2004, 02:32 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Oh yeah, I'm not complaining. I'm very satisfied
> with my purchase.

Good, cause people who think they pay for something
cheap expecting it to be shiney & new, have got
another thing comming to them! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 26th, 2004, 04:06 AM
I dunno, you might get lucky and stumble across the occaisional gem tho. Last week I picked up a copy of 101 Projects For The Z80, in mint to near-mint condition, for $0.41, at the local Sally. They usually charge a whole buck for hardcover books, but thier other store had already cleaned me out of cash. When I whipped out a credit card to pay for the book, (my only purchase) the cashier informed me that they have a $7.00 minimum on cc sales (something about the way they are charged by the credit company). I then stuck my hand into my pocket and pulled out all the change. I said "I have fourty-one cents. Negotiate?" She just smiled and held out her hand. (It was a cashier I knew well anyways. I used to fix her car, back in the day). I said "Thanks, Gracie," and left with a new book for my collection.

--T

CP/M User
May 27th, 2004, 01:58 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I dunno, you might get lucky and stumble across the
> occaisional gem tho. Last week I picked up a copy
> of -"101 Projects For The Z80"-, in mint to near-mint
> condition, for $0.41, at the local Sally. They usually
> charge a whole buck for hardcover books, but thier
> other store had already cleaned me out of cash.
> When I whipped out a credit card to pay for the book,
> (my only purchase) the cashier informed me that
> they have a $7.00 minimum on cc sales (something
> about the way they are charged by the credit
> company). I then stuck my hand into my pocket and
> pulled out all the change. I said "I have fourty-one
> cents. Negotiate?" She just smiled and held out her
> hand. (It was a cashier I knew well anyways. I
> used to fix her car, back in the day). I said
> "Thanks, Gracie," and left with a new book for my
> collection.

What sort of shop is it, one where people donate good
to them & they sell it via their store (e.g. Salvation
Army stores here do that), generally you'd fine
something there in good condition for cheap. I month
or so ago I found an Amstrad CPC book in very good
condition for only $4! It's the book though which
makes it cheap. On the Internet though, they price
books based on some condtion of it. In some cases
it's $100s if the book is rare & in excellent condition.
Bookstores I've generally been to, sell books cheap
cause they want to get rid of it, but on the Internet,
they generally know that, anyone from anywhere
around the world, could find something rare & pay
anything for it based on condition.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 27th, 2004, 02:49 PM
Oh, sorry. I thought the (slang) term was universal. Over here, we often call the Salvation Army "Sally," or sometimes "SallyAnn." When a convict is getting close to being paroled, he might tell folks that he intends to live "with Sally" upon his release. (One of the pre-requisites of parole is that one must have someplace to go afterwards. The Sallys in most major cities operate "men's shelters," where the down-and-out may stay for free, sometimes in exchange for light work, perhaps in the store itself).

--T

CP/M User
May 28th, 2004, 02:49 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Oh, sorry. I thought the (slang) term was universal.
> Over here, we often call the Salvation Army "Sally,"
> or sometimes "SallyAnn."

I'll grab your "Sally" & raise ya a Sheila.

> When a convict is getting close to being paroled, he
> might tell folks that he intends to live "with Sally"
> upon his release. (One of the pre-requisites of
> parole is that one must have someplace to go
> afterwards. The Sallys in most major cities operate
> "men's shelters," where the down-and-out may
> stay for free, sometimes in exchange for light work,
> perhaps in the store itself).

Our Salvo's (or Salvation Army), probably don't go to
those extermes, sure they help out the poor & they
also have job agencies (where they can help you get
a job). They have shops setup, these are made from
good people donated. It's all still in a worthy cause.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 28th, 2004, 02:59 AM
I'll see your Sheila, and raise you a "Barbie!"

--T

CP/M User
May 28th, 2004, 03:10 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I'll see your Sheila, and raise you a "Barbie!"

'Cor Blimey, ya've brash out a Barbs, geez!! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User (999).

Terry Yager
May 28th, 2004, 08:15 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I'll see your Sheila, and raise you a "Barbie!"

'Cor Blimey, ya've brash out a Barbs, geez!! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User (999).

Ok, I give up. Whaddid he say? Anyone care to translate that into English?

--T

CP/M User
May 28th, 2004, 02:15 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

>>> I'll see your Sheila, and raise you a "Barbie!"

>> 'Cor Blimey, ya've brash out a Barbs, geez!! ;-)

> Ok, I give up. Whaddid he say? Anyone
> care to translate that into English?

Actually it just doesn't quite make sense! ;-)

But to interpret this further I mean't this:

"Oh Dear, you've foward out a Barbie, Golly!! ;-)"

I have no idea where those slang words came
from, they're just slang, not really proper Aussie
expressions (I dare say! ;-)

Cheers,
CP/M User (That will be 1000 posts! YEAH!).

Terry Yager
May 28th, 2004, 02:44 PM
Well, barbie is one Aussie term which has migrated to this country, thanks to the Crocodile Dundee movies. Everyone here says it now.

--T

Terry Yager
May 28th, 2004, 02:47 PM
CP/M User (That will be 1000 posts! YEAH!).

Congratulations, ya finally made it, eh? (You're way ahead of me).

--T

CP/M User
May 28th, 2004, 09:13 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

>> CP/M User (That will be 1000 posts! YEAH!).

> Congratulations, ya finally made it, eh?

Yeah! ;-)

> (You're way ahead of me).

Not for long though, you'll beat me to 2000!

Maybe even 1500?

Cheers,
CP/M User (999 to go! ;-).

CP/M User
May 28th, 2004, 09:16 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Well, barbie is one Aussie term which has migrated
> to this country, thanks to the Crocodile Dundee
> movies. Everyone here says it now.

Oh, wasn't thinking of that. I was thinking of the Doll!

No more BBQ?!

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 29th, 2004, 07:14 AM
Oh, wasn't thinking of that. I was thinking of the Doll!

Sometimes we use the term (derogatorily) to refer to a female who is a total air-head, like the doll.


No more BBQ?!

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Well, mebbe in Texas, but that doesn't really count. Texas is a whole 'nother country in itself.

--T

NathanAllan
May 29th, 2004, 02:13 PM
I agree about Texas. I'm in El Paso. My sister in TN asked me about the difference in the accents, and it's slight, but it's there. Example: "Chair" in TN is pronounced "cheer" while in TX it's "char." Whenever I am talking to my new coworkers and a "y'all" slips out they kinda look at me funny, or a "yu'uns," heh heh.

Nathan

Terry Yager
May 29th, 2004, 04:52 PM
I agree about Texas. I'm in El Paso. My sister in TN asked me about the difference in the accents, and it's slight, but it's there. Example: "Chair" in TN is pronounced "cheer" while in TX it's "char." Whenever I am talking to my new coworkers and a "y'all" slips out they kinda look at me funny, or a "yu'uns," heh heh.

Nathan

I've always liked the way y'all say "beer" in TX. It's pronunced bee-ah, with two syllables and no "R" sound at all.

--T

CP/M User
May 29th, 2004, 11:33 PM
"NathanAllan" wrote:

> I agree about Texas. I'm in El Paso. My sister in
> TN asked me about the difference in the accents,
> and it's slight, but it's there. Example: "Chair" in
> TN is pronounced "cheer" while in TX it's "char."
> Whenever I am talking to my new coworkers
> and a "y'all" slips out they kinda look at me
> funny, or a "yu'uns," heh heh.

You'd better refresh me as to where in North
America is TN.

Us Aussies can say things differently, but over here
it all comes down to the School in which you went
to. New Zealander's have an accent of their own,
but having a large Irish background, that's been
the way they have been brought up.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

NathanAllan
May 29th, 2004, 11:38 PM
oops. That's Tennessee, TN. I'll be tossing another link out soon, got a whole bunch of books to list, all techie books. Don't have the link right now. it's an abebooks.com site.

Would anyone be interested in the user manual for the Commodore PC? I ran across it in the pile of books I am organising in the bookstore. Anyway, I'll be listing them soon. It's a big job. Lotta books there.

Nathan