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Micom 2000
June 18th, 2004, 01:07 PM
I recently acquired a Commodore 75BM13 monitor. It has a female 6-pin
DIN "signal in", similar to the C64 serial port. I haven't been able to find any info on it other than 3 oblique references in a Google search of the CBM newsgroup. The 1902 model has this pinout I've found, and it's cable
has the regular C64 8-pin video connector on the computer side.

I imagine the M13 stands for monochrome 13". It was manufactured in 1986.

To confound matters, in going thru my stash of spare cables, I found one
with male 6-pin DIN on each end, labeled monitor on one end and computer on the other. None of my considerable collection is configured
that way. Does anyone know of such a computer ?

Lawrence

carlsson
June 18th, 2004, 02:46 PM
Maybe a Commodore diskdrive with built in video generator? :lol: No, seriously I can't give you an answer, although I have a vague memory about reading something similar before. I can't remember where though - Amstrad/Schneider maybe? (CP/M User will definitely correct me here)

Terry Yager
June 18th, 2004, 04:17 PM
Hmmnn, haven't heard much from CP/M U lately. What'd he do, get a job or something?

--T

Micom 2000
June 19th, 2004, 10:01 AM
Maybe a Commodore diskdrive with built in video generator? :lol: No, seriously I can't give you an answer, although I have a vague memory about reading something similar before. I can't remember where though - Amstrad/Schneider maybe? (CP/M User will definitely correct me here)

Possibly another Commodore secret weapon for the 1541. I'll try Cameron Kaiser. My Amstrad PC1640 has a large 10-pin. In one of the
Commodore monitor lists they mention a 76 BM13 with no info and a question mark after it. And it wouldn't make sense for it to be a low-cost alternative for the 1902. Maybe I've found an ultimate Commodore rarity that some dedicated Commodore collector would give me megabucks for. Or at least a CX64. :D

I'm more curious about the cable tho. You rarely see cables with printed
designations on low-cost home computers.

Lawrence

carlsson
June 19th, 2004, 10:51 AM
CX64? I've heard about SX64 (luggable with single drive), DX64 (ditto with dual drives, extremely rare) and of course C64DX a.k.a. C65 (also a very rare machine, in particular working units IIUC).

Hey, I'm not as stupid as I look! Check this URL:

http://andercheran.aiind.upv.es/~amstrad/docs/mods/scart.html

Thus, your cable may be a video cable for the Amstrad CPC (not PCW or other models). I don't know if Commodore would make a monitor exclusively to connect an Amstrad, but since most of the C= monitors were rebadged Phillips etc, maybe yours is too.

Micom 2000
June 19th, 2004, 06:41 PM
CX64? I've heard about SX64 (luggable with single drive), DX64 (ditto with dual drives, extremely rare) and of course C64DX a.k.a. C65 (also a very rare machine, in particular working units IIUC).

Hey, I'm not as stupid as I look! Check this URL:

http://andercheran.aiind.upv.es/~amstrad/docs/mods/scart.html

Thus, your cable may be a video cable for the Amstrad CPC (not PCW or other models). I don't know if Commodore would make a monitor exclusively to connect an Amstrad, but since most of the C= monitors were rebadged Phillips etc, maybe yours is too.

Yes, of course the SX64. I'm notoriously bad with remembered model #s.
I have also referred to an Epson HX10 as a QX10 the later QX20 reference. Don't ask me about my Atari 8-bit models unless i have one
in front of me. For some reason I remember numerical model #s better.

Unfortunately the SX64 has become hot due to a popular conversion page somewhat similar to the one on making a Mac into an aquarium.

I'll check out the Amstrads but they were more prevalent over the pond
rather than in N.A. , altho Amstrad monitors were the most prevalent monitor in canadian thrifts when I started collecting. Cheap monochromes.

lawrence

carlsson
June 21st, 2004, 03:49 AM
I dunno if SX-64's have become more hot after someone gutted one and installed an ITX motherboard, but as long as the unit is dead anyway, I find it an interesting use. If I had one with a dead motherboard, I think I would install a VIC-20 one and get a SX-20...

Yes, Amstrad was a typical British machine which barely made its way to Sweden, much less to the USA.

Maybe there are other machines that used the same kind of layout, but I didn't find any quickly with Google. It is probably difficult to measure your cable to determine which kind of signal goes in which pin, but if you're really curious, you could carefully open the monitor and try to trace the signals... :twisted:

carlsson
October 19th, 2004, 01:46 PM
Lawrence, did you ever find out which machine your monitor and cable are meant for?

It seems analogue TTL RGBI can take the shape of either 6-pin (odd?) or 8-pin (standard) DIN rather than the 9-pin DSUB we normally think of. There were some variations of the famous 1084 series which uses a 6-pin DIN:

http://www.hardwarebook.net/connector/av/c1084a.html

which doesn't explain your monitor but gives a hint where to look for an adapter to take the 6-pin DIN into a 23-pin (Amiga) or 9-pin (C128) DSUB. I would however have expected your cable to include the adapter part? Someone seven years ago mentioned "monochrome TTL" in combination with your monitor in a repair newsgroup, which should tell we're on the right path. Maybe it would be worth contacting him who had a broken monitor like yours just to ask what it is for. :lol:

Otherwise, the only computers I know of which use the 6-pin DIN for video are Amstrad CPC and possibly Acorn BBC/Electron series. It would be very odd if Commodore had made or even worse, branded a monitor only for use with a competiting computer brand... I have even looked at oddities like Commodore 900 and of course the rest of the Commodore PC range.

The Atari ST uses a 13-pin DIN, but I'm not sure if it is backwards key compatible with the 6-pin. The 5-pin (analogue CGA, VIC-20, SVI-318, Dragon 32, TI-99/4A and many more) and 8-pin (C64, Plus/4, ZX Spectrum 128 etc) DINs are not compatible.

carlsson
October 19th, 2004, 02:25 PM
Wow, look here:

http://members.rott.chello.nl/mlampers/Personal%20Computers.htm

It is not 75BM13 but 76BM13 used with a Commodore Colt (XT) and PC-10. Have you ever owned one of those?

Terry Yager
October 19th, 2004, 04:08 PM
I've had a couple of the Colts, years ago, but they've both gone on to C= Heaven now.

--T

rgb
May 3rd, 2007, 09:16 PM
I recently acquired a Commodore 75BM13 monitor. It has a female 6-pin
DIN "signal in", similar to the C64 serial port. I haven't been able to find any info on it other than 3 oblique references in a Google search of the CBM newsgroup. The 1902 model has this pinout I've found, and it's cable
has the regular C64 8-pin video connector on the computer side.

I imagine the M13 stands for monochrome 13". It was manufactured in 1986.

To confound matters, in going thru my stash of spare cables, I found one
with male 6-pin DIN on each end, labeled monitor on one end and computer on the other. None of my considerable collection is configured
that way. Does anyone know of such a computer ?

Lawrence

I have one of these monitors that I am about to give away. It came with a converter cable to go from 6 pin din to DE9Male TTL Hercules monochrome adaptor on an IBM PC or clone. The wiring I have is:



DE9Male - DIN6Male
1-----shield-----6
2-----white------3
3-----n/c
4-----n/c
5-----n/c
6-----brown------4
7------red-------5
8-----green------1
9-----black------2


din6male, facing from outside to inside connector:


1 V 5
6
2 4
3


I hope this helps.

RGB -- http://tricolour.net

carlsson
May 4th, 2007, 12:01 AM
Now when I think about it, I remember an old Wang PC that had DIN-style connectors for video. I'm not sure if they were 6-pin, but the computer had a connector for external video input and the monitor was able to display 640x200 EGA class graphics, much like the Wang did itself in native mode.

rmay635703
May 6th, 2007, 08:49 AM
didn't the Magnavox M31501 (M31XXX there was more than one model) pc take strange analog cables to fit the many strange analog magnavox monitors they released?

Just a thought.

I also know that machines that were called computers like my futura 100 that were actually video appliances (or what we would call one today) also occasionally had nonstandard round video plugs.

artur.heise
May 31st, 2007, 03:37 AM
I recently acquired a Commodore 75BM13 monitor. It has a female 6-pin


Looks like the 1084/1084S shares the same kind of socket :)

http://pinouts.ru/Video/C1084a_pinout.shtml