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Thread: Macworld has a retrospective of Mac history.

  1. #1

    Default Macworld has a retrospective of Mac history.

    I noticed at the grocery store, but decided not to buy the magazine. It had an old picture of a smiling Steve Jobs with two old Macintoshes. It claimed the picture was taken 25 years ago & in their first issue they'd carefully explained the desktop of the Mac.

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    I could have had the entire 1st vol. of macworld in a boxed set, but passed it up. It's from the darkside. But I did take the boxed set of PC world mag's

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    Mac history could be summed up in a few lines;

    1) Introduce a computer that is incompatible with everything else on the face of the Earth.
    2) Convince the artsy-fartsy crowd that it makes them unique. Unique in the fact that they are paying 1.5 - 2 times what they could get a Intel clone for to do the same thing.
    3) Get it into the schools by giving them away (financed by the artsy-fartsy crowd) and "demo machines" given to the people who make the decisions.
    4) Obsolete it in 6 months and make anyone who doesn't upgrade immediately a pariah.
    5) Repeat until...
    6) Make it a WIntel clone
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    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    Mac history could be summed up in a few lines;

    1) Introduce a computer that is incompatible with everything else on the face of the Earth.
    2) Convince the artsy-fartsy crowd that it makes them unique. Unique in the fact that they are paying 1.5 - 2 times what they could get a Intel clone for to do the same thing.
    3) Get it into the schools by giving them away (financed by the artsy-fartsy crowd) and "demo machines" given to the people who make the decisions.
    4) Obsolete it in 6 months and make anyone who doesn't upgrade immediately a pariah.
    5) Repeat until...
    6) Make it a WIntel clone
    Gee, what a constructive and totally objective post.

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    I have quite a few Macworld magazines covering the time period I cared about (missing a few in 93/94 I think) plus the original 1st years release including issue #1. Issue #1 has a geek looking Bill Gates gushing about how the mac is so superior to other platforms, guess he changed his mind later on in life and got a better haircut.

    Nothing makes you want to spend money on ebay then reading about some cool hardware or software in the old magazines.

    Honestly Jobs original mac was a useless piece of junk, not enough RAM to be usefull (128K when the LISA was shipping with 1MB), and little software (because it was new and didn't run LISA apps or Apple II ones either). I think original adopters got burned on buying them, or had to pay quite a bit to get them upgraded to 512K where they started being usefull.

    My favorite period of Macs is after Jobs got fired and before he got back. I like the expandable towerd machines starting with the Mac II and SE/30 and ending with the Beige G3 MT and Wallstreet laptop. If jobs had stayed I don't there would have been a mac you can take the cover off and expand so they would have died out and we would be using Apple XX's by now that were expandable.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
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  6. #6

    Default Steve balmer should go back to selling used cars!

    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    I have quite a few Macworld magazines covering the time period I cared about (missing a few in 93/94 I think) plus the original 1st years release including issue #1. Issue #1 has a geek looking Bill Gates gushing about how the mac is so superior to other platforms, guess he changed his mind later on in life and got a better haircut.
    Bill Gates knew that the GUI/MOUSE was the way of the future for computers, he just had to find a way to copy it, make it work good enough and cheap, the Walmart mentality in the 80's of computers. Move ahead 20+ years and their incompetance is finally catching up with them, Vista!
    Last edited by gerrydoire; January 9th, 2009 at 10:06 AM.
    GEEKS WITH A GRUDGE!

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    Methinks you are forgetting what things were like back then.

    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    Mac history could be summed up in a few lines;

    1) Introduce a computer that is incompatible with everything else on the face of the Earth.
    The cool thing about that era was that a better mousetrap stood a chance of gaining market share. Do you really believe the inertia-laden x86 architecture is that elegant?

    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    2) Convince the artsy-fartsy crowd that it makes them unique. Unique in the fact that they are paying 1.5 - 2 times what they could get a Intel clone for to do the same thing.
    Show me an Intel clone from 1986 that was the equivelent of the Mac *and* had professional-level software available *and* had the marketing and history of Apple. And had the same performance. Once you added enough onto a PC to let it do what the Mac did, the price point was the same or worse.

    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    3) Get it into the schools by giving them away (financed by the artsy-fartsy crowd) and "demo machines" given to the people who make the decisions.
    That marketing move actually is more tightly tied to the Apple ][ line and was a brilliant move to get rid of inventory, take donation write offs *and* influence future users.

    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    4) Obsolete it in 6 months and make anyone who doesn't upgrade immediately a pariah.
    5) Repeat until...
    6) Make it a WIntel clone
    Yes, because that *never* happens in the PC world. Hey, remember the Itanium? That was the PC world's attempt to do what Apple does (break out of x86).

    I'm actually not an Apple fanboy; I own a good representation of the history but have never been a user, not since the ][e, anyway. In my opinion, Apples have a very solid place in personal computing history, and that includes their effect on the marketing of devices that until then only appealed to accountants and hardware geeks.

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    Picked up a copy the other day. The writer did a pretty fair job of covering not only the good products but also some of the bombs. Pretty interesting read overall IMHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kastegir View Post
    Gee, what a constructive and totally objective post.
    Yeah, the truth is often like that.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ScrappyLaptop View Post
    Methinks you are forgetting what things were like back then.



    The cool thing about that era was that a better mousetrap stood a chance of gaining market share. Do you really believe the inertia-laden x86 architecture is that elegant?



    Show me an Intel clone from 1986 that was the equivelent of the Mac *and* had professional-level software available *and* had the marketing and history of Apple. And had the same performance. Once you added enough onto a PC to let it do what the Mac did, the price point was the same or worse.



    That marketing move actually is more tightly tied to the Apple ][ line and was a brilliant move to get rid of inventory, take donation write offs *and* influence future users.



    Yes, because that *never* happens in the PC world. Hey, remember the Itanium? That was the PC world's attempt to do what Apple does (break out of x86).

    I'm actually not an Apple fanboy; I own a good representation of the history but have never been a user, not since the ][e, anyway. In my opinion, Apples have a very solid place in personal computing history, and that includes their effect on the marketing of devices that until then only appealed to accountants and hardware geeks.
    Oh, I'm not saying that they did anything wrong, I'm just saying that's how I see their history. It was repeated time and time again.

    Back when the world of computers was "every company's proprietary system", apple was no better or worse than anyone else.

    However, the x86/ISA platform took off and never looked back and manufacturers either adapted or died.

    There is just no way a competing system could stand up against the Wintel Juggernaut. Apple managed to hang on a lot longer than the others, but, that was entirely due to a massive financial infusion from the company that everyone loves to hate.

    The company was never large enough or powerful enough to greatly influence the course of computing the way Windows and Intel have been able to and they were relegated to the "We want to be different" crowd.

    Everyone has an opinion and as someone that has been around the computer scene and worked with and on most platforms, that's mine.
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