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Thread: Everex ev-18108 motherboard

  1. #1
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    Default Everex ev-18108 motherboard

    Has anyone ever seen one of these? It's a 386DX mobo, which (as per the docs I found online) can come with either a 20, 25 or 33 MHz CPU. I don't know if the CPU is soldered or socketed though.

    The reason I'm asking is because I found one of these online pretty cheap, but have no picture of it. It also comes with the proprietary memory card, so even a better deal.

  2. #2
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    Have you looked at TH99 to see if it has a schematic/pinout?

    http://th99.dyndns.org/m/E-H/31579.htm

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    Yes I did (that's what I meant by "online docs" - well, that and http://bk0010.narod.ru/hardware_specs/m/) - but it isn't clear if the cpu is socketed or not, and also nothing specific in the part name to indicate the cpu speed.

    My best guess is the cpu is probably socketed, and the mobo probably comes without any cpu - which makes it slightly less of a deal.

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    Based on the fact that the board was available in different speeds as well as the fact that it is a 386DX I would be shocked to find that the CPU was soldered on.

    From the manufacturing standpoint, it is much simpler to make a one-size-fits-all motherboard than it is to make multiple versions of what is essentially the same item.

  5. #5
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    Default chip size

    If it's any help, on the drawing, the chip size looks about right for a socketed DX, judging by the FPU socket next to it. The qfpp DX is a tad smaller than the FPU socket.
    patscc

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    Precisely my judgement. OTOH that means I'm not limited to Intel chips, and I can go hunting for a Cx486DRx2 or something.

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    The Step 386 is socketed. Not as desirable as the early Everex (mostly SSI TTL) 386 mobos, but be careful --some of the early custom gate arrays have interesting "quirks". I don't know of the Everex is one of these, however.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpatten View Post
    Based on the fact that the board was available in different speeds as well as the fact that it is a 386DX I would be shocked to find that the CPU was soldered on.

    From the manufacturing standpoint, it is much simpler to make a one-size-fits-all motherboard than it is to make multiple versions of what is essentially the same item.
    Not necessarily. Many everex 386 boards have the CPU and base RAM on a CPU/memory card - with the CPU soldered on. And there is at least another everex 386 board that came with CPUs in 2 speed variants and they were soldered on: http://bk0010.narod.ru/hardware_specs/m/E-H/30520.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by jh1523 View Post
    Not necessarily. Many everex 386 boards have the CPU and base RAM on a CPU/memory card - with the CPU soldered on. And there is at least another everex 386 board that came with CPUs in 2 speed variants and they were soldered on: http://bk0010.narod.ru/hardware_specs/m/E-H/30520.htm
    386SX chips, like 486SX chips were invariably soldered in--their raison d'etre being cheapness. 386DX boards, however, rarely had the CPU soldered in. The 18108 is a 386DX board.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by dpatten View Post
    From the manufacturing standpoint, it is much simpler to make a one-size-fits-all motherboard than it is to make multiple versions of what is essentially the same item.
    From the marketing standpoint, it might be perceived to be more profitable to force the user to replace the entire mainboard in order to upgrade.

    --T
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