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Thread: 10 year quest

  1. #1

    Default 10 year quest

    .. but I finally was able to secure a Pentium I 200, non-mmx on ebay, for 3 bucks

    Now I can finally upgrade my P90 (after I gave up 8 years ago :P)

  2. #2

    Default

    oh man, do i ever sound like you!

    my main internet computer is a pentium 166 running win95, and i am about to upgrade to somewhere around the pentium 300 area, as one of the fellow vintage comp. guys is giving me one for free.

    maybe i will find out what all the fuss was about with win98

    chris
    The vic rocks!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Västerås, Sweden
    Posts
    6,277

    Default

    I believe I pretty much maxed out my previous PC, a Socket 7 mobo running a Pentium 200MMX, 64 MB RAM (of which 32MB EDO DIMM) and a 3 GB hard drive. Theoretically I could've stuffed a better graphics card than the 2 MB S3 Virge DX/GX, better sound than the ISA Opti16 and better network than the ISA 3C509B, but all are within its generation specs. Officially the motherboard doesn't support newer CPUs than the one mentioned, and I'm not sure if it would let me play with some jumpers to get beyond that anyway. The computer now partly is stripped from parts, but most of it is left intact if I ever have the need to boot it.

    When it comes to upgradable computers, I understand the original configuration is collectable (never mind how old it is - things get older by time). What about maximum official upgrade or maximum possible upgrade, will those kind of machines be worth less than original config?
    Anders Carlsson

  4. #4

    Default

    I'd imagine that the upgraded machines (or the components used to upgrade) might appreciate in value or be more "collectable" due to rarity. My logic might be flawed here, but it seems to me that by the time you get the maximum upgrade for your system, there's probably something newer that's available. That being the case, I'd think that fewer components would be produced for the upgrades. I'd back that up with examples, but I can't think of any right now.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
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    7,375
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    Default

    The only parts that have some value on 286 and newer machines would be the rare addon cards, and parts needed for gaming (sound and video).

    A stock pentium will be common for many more years to come

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Saginaw, MI, USA 48601
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    Default

    I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

    --T
    Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
    _____________________________________________

    Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

  7. #7

    Default

    I am also on a 10 year Quest...and it's almost finished. I already have all the major components collected, and I just have a few minor ones left to go. I'm sure several of you in here are already familiar with my EISA 486 project. I'm actually on a quest to build the ultimate 486, but the ultimate 486 turned out to be an EISA machine. When I am finished, I am going to build a webpage dedicated to it...then you guys can shit your pants. I'm using all the tricks in the book to make this thing fly. I hope you will be able to appreciate it, because it's burning a bloody hole in my pocket!!!

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous Coward
    I am also on a 10 year Quest...and it's almost finished. I already have all the major components collected, and I just have a few minor ones left to go. I'm sure several of you in here are already familiar with my EISA 486 project. I'm actually on a quest to build the ultimate 486, but the ultimate 486 turned out to be an EISA machine. When I am finished, I am going to build a webpage dedicated to it...then you guys can shit your pants. I'm using all the tricks in the book to make this thing fly. I hope you will be able to appreciate it, because it's burning a bloody hole in my pocket!!!
    Well.. tell us what you need?

  9. #9

    Default

    Actually, I don't think you need to worry about it. Everytime I need a component I post an ad in the wanted section. However, since most of the parts I want are so obscure, nobody ever reponds to them. There are three components I have left to buy which are not critical. They are more of luxury items. I am looking for a Plextor 32X caddy loading drive with a beige bezel, a Seagate Barracuda 36ES2 SCSI drive based on IDE technology, and an NIB Gateway 2000 programmable keyboard manufactured by Maxi-Switch.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Yager
    I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

    --T
    I had a IBM Amber (I think thats what the line was called)
    It was a Pentium 60 with the bug. RAN HOT AS HELL.
    I gave it to a friend and he chucked it in the trash.
    I GAVE HIM ONE NASTY VERBAL BEATING.
    Not because it has any value (Because im pretty sure it does not)
    But beacause i never ever throw out good hardware.
    I find it hard enough trying to throw out bad hardware as you just
    never know when you'll need something off it.

    Besides who cares if the computers worth money unless thats your only
    goal. Myself i like, what i like and what i don't, I don't bother collecting
    unless the price is right.

    Noth'n wrong with a pen90. They are might sturdy computers
    i still use a pen100 for a VPN gateway

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