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View Poll Results: How long will it take to defeat the new protection?

Voters
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  • Before the new drives ship out!

    2 25.00%
  • Within a week.

    0 0%
  • No more then a month

    2 25.00%
  • By six months for sure!

    1 12.50%
  • Never! Macrovision rules!

    0 0%
  • What's a DVD?

    3 37.50%
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Thread: Macrovision's new DVD copy protection

  1. #1

    Default Macrovision's new DVD copy protection

    here's something i came across while reading the news today on shortnews.

    http://www.shortnews.com/start.cfm?i...&rubrikid1=388

    It's about Macrovisions news copy protection there trying to push.
    What's your thoughts? How long will it take to defeat it if they get there way?
    If you don\'t know where you are going.. Any road will get you there.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Macrovision only deals with the symtoms, not the cure. As soon as new copy protection comes out someone finds a "crack". If not digitally, they'll use a digital VCR! Try fixing the problem and not bandaid it.
    Rick Ethridge

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Macrovision's new DVD copy protection

    "joe sixpack" wrote:

    > here's something i came across while reading the news today on
    > shortnews.

    > It's about Macrovisions news copy protection there trying to push.
    > What's your thoughts? How long will it take to defeat it if they get there
    > way?

    Well your six months is well & truly up - what's the verdict (so I can vote
    accordingly)?!?

    Is Macrovisions copy protection still King?!?

    Somebody told me years ago that our DVD players with Worldwide
    Zoning (hence play any DVD from any region - properly programmed)
    would become useless - yet I've had no problems with mine. They told
    me brand new movies would appear in B&W. I still see no evidence of this.

    What happened?

    CP/M User.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I've read that at the DVD Forum Conference in Japan this year, it was suggested that the upcoming storage medium HD DVD will not use region coding. Toshiba's spokesperson mentioned that within the Steering Committee for this new format, region coding is "extremely unpopular", although the movie companies may be of a different opinion.

    http://www.bit-tech.net/news/2005/10..._region_codes/
    Anders Carlsson

  5. #5
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    Default

    "carlsson" wrote:

    > I've read that at the DVD Forum Conference in Japan this year, it was
    > suggested that the upcoming storage medium HD DVD will not use
    > region coding. Toshiba's spokesperson mentioned that within the
    > Steering Committee for this new format, region coding is "extremely
    > unpopular", although the movie companies may be of a different
    > opinion.

    I really wonder if it's the movie companies or if it's the Censorship people
    (maybe both) that want regional coding. I mean a lot of American movies
    we get here are Rated [R] in the US. Yet our censorship (the people who
    review the films - before the viewing public) can grab a [R] rated movie &
    make it a [M] rated movie (for us a M rated moving is Recommended for
    persons over 15 years of age - I guess is comparable to the US's PG-13).
    But we also have MA15+ which I believe is restricted - youngsters must
    accompany an adult - same as our R18+ we hardly have any [R] stuff.

    Friends of ours lent us a copy of his remake of "A Thomas Crown Affair"
    with Piece Brosman(?) - but he got it from the States - hence it was an
    [R] rated movie, now I'm reasonibly sure (it was a while since I saw it)
    bits were cut out - love scenes & all that Jazz when I saw it on Telly!! ;-)
    Not a lot - I think it was mostly graphic, you could still work out the story
    line though.
    Anyway - I can't help but think that lots of these movies go through this
    process for when they are shown in the movies & then put onto DVDs!

  6. #6
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    Default

    Region coding seems to fill two purposes, as far as I'm concerned:

    1) Release a production (movie, game or otherwise) in different regions on different date, to focus marketing to one region at a time and limit availability.
    2) Be able to sell a production for a lower price to a certain (poorer) region. On a market that is overflowing with pirate copies anyway, the movie, record or game company may consider selling their original edition for 1/5th of the otherwise recommended price, but they want to prevent tourists and others to benefit from this.

    When it comes to censorship, a movie may be rated and censored differently even if it technically plays on the same video system. Most countries will have regulations which stores can sell movies, video games and other things that may need censorship, and there typically are a bunch of agents and distributors appointed by the big companies. A store that uses grey (half illegal) parallel import will be punished even if their products are fully playable on the customers' units.

    Funny that you should mention love scenes. I thought US censorship was rather strict but at the same time double-edged when it came to sexual or nude content. An European movie may be even more graphic, although I don't know if Pierce Brosnan would be man enough to handle that.
    Anders Carlsson

  7. #7
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    Default

    "carlsson" wrote:

    > Region coding seems to fill two purposes, as far as I'm concerned:

    > 1) Release a production (movie, game or otherwise) in different regions
    > on different date, to focus marketing to one region at a time and limit
    > availability.

    That usually applies to new movies which are released at the Cinema -
    then come out on DVD. But everyone who usually has the knack to obtain
    DVD from overseas (of the same movie which is just beginning to show
    it's face on the big screen here) have DVD players which can play DVDs
    from other zones - it's their job to get in first by getting it at home. The
    MacroVision thingy was brought in to keep them from distributing it into
    the streets!

    > 2) Be able to sell a production for a lower price to a certain (poorer)
    > region. On a market that is overflowing with pirate copies anyway, the
    > movie, record or game company may consider selling their original
    > edition for 1/5th of the otherwise recommended price, but they want to
    > prevent tourists and others to benefit from this.

    That's one of the sadest things I've heard. Everyone knows the world doesn't quite work like that, sure there's the poverty stricken countries which have no time for this - or there's the poor parts of town (in every country in the world). Retailers really get you in the high-roll parts of town & offer affordable services to anyone in the poor parts of town. People moan & grown about prices of DVDs cause there's a sliding scale for people who are managing (some too well & get rewarded for it) to the Battler who just gets enough money to support themselves for the basic needs - no niceities in life!).

    > When it comes to censorship, a movie may be rated and censored
    > differently even if it technically plays on the same video system. Most
    > countries will have regulations which stores can sell movies, video
    > games and other things that may need censorship, and there typically
    > are a bunch of agents and distributors appointed by the big companies.
    > A store that uses grey (half illegal) parallel import will be punished
    > even if their products are fully playable on the customers' units.

    Every movie which comes into this country get reviewed by a pannel which can determine what material is too graphic, violent or whatever else exceeds it's requirements. And I think that for the way for most movies to get betting a [M] rating, content from that original [R] rated movie from the states or wherever else (Europe) maybe removed - obviously it's nothing significant - but something may change. I don't know how they'd do Violence though, perhaps there's alternative scripts used shot at alternative angles (you know how they sometimes shoot more than one take for a section) maybe that's how they do it? The film industry may recommend what alternatives are available if some of it is too graphic - based on audience, they tend to try & get an [R] rated movie downto an [M] makes it more pleasing to the 13 or 14 year old. But certainally allow a 15 year old to simply go & watch it.

    > Funny that you should mention love scenes. I thought US censorship
    > was rather strict but at the same time double-edged when it came to
    > sexual or nude content. An European movie may be even more
    > graphic, although I don't know if Pierce Brosnan would be man enough
    > to handle that. ;-)

    Well he seemed to be hitting it off in his first 007 role in GoldenEye! That was another strange movie - at the cinema they though it was a movie rated [PG] on telly they thought it was a [M] rating movie with Violence and the US probably have it listed as an [R] rated movie. But I thought Brosman was one of you! He's European - actually we found him in some other raunchy European movie which is steamier than the local Sauna - the lady in that just couldn't get enough! ;-)

    Even the original Thomas Crown Affair (with Steve McQueen) is [R] rated movie - over here it's rated [PG], what's the story there.

    Anyway...

    CP/M User.

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