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Thread: Where are the unusual systems?

  1. #1
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    Default Where are the unusual systems?

    I've seen lots of major-brand systems mentioned here but very few off-brands. Where are the Tiki-100s, the IBS Ultraframes, the NEC Bungos, the Preis-es, the People's Worlds?

    Someone have something obscure?

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I've seen lots of major-brand systems mentioned here but very few off-brands. Where are the Tiki-100s, the IBS Ultraframes, the NEC Bungos, the Preis-es, the People's Worlds?

    Someone have something obscure?
    I have a Norsk Data ND-110/CX. An fairly odd mini made in Norway. Today it's pretty much me, a few swedes and the North Korean air force who uses them

    The company where I work has a few oddballs as well, such as the swedish unixmachine called "Diab" and I _think_ there is a Bull (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Groupe_Bull) in the attic.

    I've never heard about the ones you listed, the commodores and apples get all the attention
    Looking for: anything from SGI or DEC/digital
    Pictures of my collection: www.pdp8.se

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by pontus View Post
    I've never heard about the ones you listed, the commodores and apples get all the attention
    My Tiki-100 samples came from a customer in Sweden who, I believe said it was a Swedish-made system.

    Here's a NEC Bungo Mini5. The Bungo was actually a line of machines, from a fairly clunky desktop system to color laptops. Mostly intended for word processing (Japanese and Roman character sets), the early ones ran CP/M. Very cool stuff.

    The IBS Ultraframe was a mid 1980's S-100 system using multiple 80186 boards for up to 32 users. Iit ran CP/M-86.

    The Preis was a luggable CP/M Z-80 system and one of the first ones that I'm aware of to use the new Sony 3.5" format (single-sided, 40 cylinders, 600 RPM).

    The People's World (not to be confused with the Olympia "People") would be a real find today. A 1970's system coming out of Berkeley, it had a wooden case with engraved brass nameplate.

    Whatever happened to these old systems?

    People know about the KIM-1, but how about a NEC TK-80 (1976):


  4. #4
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    I believe Tiki was Norwegian, but I could be wrong. Regarding less common CP/M computers, how do the Danish RC series count? There was a forum member a couple of years ago who owned a RC Piccolo or if it was RC Partner, but he's not active any more.
    Anders Carlsson

  5. #5

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    Hm.. not sure what my unusual systems would be, I guess I have lots of the common collectibles. I have a Panasonic Electronic Typing Station (cp/m desktop system) that's interesting. I also have the portable Columbia Data Products PC http://www.old-computers.com/museum/...asp?st=1&c=889.

    Don't think I have anything too uncommon, I started collecting systems that were known as firsts to minimize my spending although it still doesn't work that well.

  6. #6

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    If trainers counts I have swedish kit called "Mickey" its an 8085-based kit made by "NTI-skolan" for learning about electronics and computing. hmm.. I should probably dump those roms before they go bad.

    Never seen or heard about this kit before I found it in my fathers attic.
    Looking for: anything from SGI or DEC/digital
    Pictures of my collection: www.pdp8.se

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by carlsson View Post
    I believe Tiki was Norwegian, but I could be wrong.
    Yes, they where. Named after one of the expeditions [Kon-Tiki ekspedisjonen] of the (in)famous norwegian explorer "Thor Heyerdahl".

    In fact, my school might have a pile of them (along with a pile of Tandberg computers). At least, they had a pile of them until pretty recently. I've asked a teacher (several times) if he can check if they're still there, but he never get the time.

    Want one of them
    Last edited by per; March 12th, 2009 at 02:12 PM.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    The Preis was a luggable CP/M Z-80 system and one of the first ones that I'm aware of to use the new Sony 3.5" format (single-sided, 40 cylinders, 600 RPM).
    Very interesting. Any idea what year that came out? Got any photos?

    Thanks,
    Andy

    "It's a me-too, 8-bit machine with good graphics and a disk system nobody will support."
    -- Bill Gates, about the Sony SMC-70 with the new 3.5" floppy drives (InfoWorld; June 7, 1982)

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahm View Post
    Very interesting. Any idea what year that came out? Got any photos?
    About 1982. No photos, but I still have a boot diskette and BIOS listing. I remember it mostly because I was asked to code up hard disk support for it. When the project was over, I returned the system to the customer. ISTR that the hard drive was an Evotek (fairly large for the time, but flakey as all get out), but never did get to see it actually put in the box--the unit I used was spread out on my bench, as was the controller.

  10. #10
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    All I ever get around here is the proverbial (virtual) blank stare whenever I mention the PMC MicroMate, which is one of my favorite computers. I didn't think they were that obscure, anyone else remember them? No pix yet, but I'll try and post some tomorrow (I'm in no condition to dig it out tonight).

    --T

    EDIT: Never mind, google produced this:

    http://www.computercloset.org/PMCMicroMate.htm

    Close enough, except mine has a white-faced TEAC drive installed instead, just cause it looked better with the terminal I used to couple it with. I'll prob'ly switch it back to black now, since I'll be using it with an all-black terminal, soon's I get it running again.

    --T
    Last edited by Terry Yager; March 12th, 2009 at 10:15 PM.
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