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Thread: Powertran Cortex

  1. #641

    Default Ritchie C compiler port

    Just a quick progress report. The port (as a cross compiler for now) is progressing nicely. Back then software packages did not come with test suites, so I use the Xinu source for that. The Xinu source consists of many short files (often only 30..70 lines), with one or two functions each. This makes it feasible to inspect the compiler assembler output and match it against its C source.

    I'm working from the 2.11BSD version of the compiler, which was maintained till the early 90's: by and large it is a C89 compliant compiler.

    Just to give an idea of where it is at, please find an example compilation attached. Note however that so far I have mostly looked at working with 'int', stuff related to e.g. long or float does not work at all yet.

    Paul
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #642
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southampton, UK
    Posts
    169

    Default Summary for posterity of some recent e-mails

    Dave supplied a C99 demo project for the Cortex, using asm990, lnk990, and bin990 to create a Cortex cassette image.

    ====

    Hi Stuart,

    For what it's worth, I tried the demo with 'UNIT 2' and 'UNIT -1' for
    RS232 only and it did display text on the terminal (but without cursor-control). I did this as I thought your set up is like this?

    Also, if you remove the -x option from the bin990 utility, then it will generate pure binary machine code instead of a cassette image. Perhaps this would be useful with your other 99xx hardware? You would have to modify the putchar/getchar assembler routines in CortexRTL.asm, but I'm sure you're that's no problem for you.

    Dave.

    ====

    C99 is essentially Small C ported to the 9900: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Small-C, there's links to resources from there.
    I still have the original articles from Dr. Dobbs somewhere, if need be I can scan those (but they are about the 8080 version).

    In related news, I'm still making progress with the Ritchie compiler. I've now succeeded in compiling several files from Xinu (in fact all the material from chapter 4 of the 1984 version of the Xinu book: the process queue). The output code seems about equally dense as pdp11 code (fewer addressing modes make the code longer, but more registers make it shorter, it seems to balance out).

    Paul

    ====

    Stuart queried if there was a switch to make the .obj file from lnk990 absolute rather than relative. Dave replied:

    The asm990 and lnk990 are from Dave Pitts and modified by me for DOS. The demo.obj is created by linking the relocatable asm modules to a single relocatable object. I asked Dave Pitts how to get an absolute file from that instead (ie the same question you have) and he said in a TI990 the operating system loads it at run time and assigns the load address at that time. Since it's a multi tasking OS, the programs have to be relocatable.

    So he gave me a copy of what the OS does and my bin990 is based on that. I tell it the load address via the command line and it builds the executable as if it was about to be run by the TI990 OS.

    ====

    Paul said:

    "a TI990 the operating system loads it at run time and assigns the load address at that time"

    That is what EVMBUG on the breadboard does as well: you pass an absolute load address to the LMC command and it relocates the .obj as part of the loading.

  3. #643
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Florida, USA
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pnr View Post
    Just a quick progress report. The port (as a cross compiler for now) is progressing nicely. Back then software packages did not come with test suites, so I use the Xinu source for that. The Xinu source consists of many short files (often only 30..70 lines), with one or two functions each. This makes it feasible to inspect the compiler assembler output and match it against its C source.

    I'm working from the 2.11BSD version of the compiler, which was maintained till the early 90's: by and large it is a C89 compliant compiler.

    Just to give an idea of where it is at, please find an example compilation attached. Note however that so far I have mostly looked at working with 'int', stuff related to e.g. long or float does not work at all yet.

    Paul
    Looks good, Paul!

    The compiler certainly seems to produce some decent code, especially in terms of using the addressing modes.

    Great work so far!

    Dave.

  4. #644

    Default Ti-c

    Just received a reply from Alan Beard. He attached the source to TI-C to his message. Had a quick look and it seems to compile under gcc with only a little fiddling. It generates much better code than Clint Pulley's C99 and seems to do most of C89 sans longs and floats. Like C99 it is a single executable that outputs assembly. The output seems compatible with asm990.

    I would like to have this stuff up on the whtech site. Does anybody here know how to get in touch with the whtech maintainers?

    Paul

  5. #645

    Default

    I can make sure it gets up onto WHT. I believe Stuart can as well. This is very good news, as Al's been out of contact with the TI community for a long while. I bought his Fortran99/Fortran9640 program many years ago. It was a nice implementation of Fortran.

  6. #646
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Southampton, UK
    Posts
    169

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ksarul View Post
    I believe Stuart can as well.
    Not me.

    Stuart.

  7. #647

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ksarul View Post
    This is very good news, as Al's been out of contact with the TI community for a long while. I bought his Fortran99/Fortran9640 program many years ago. It was a nice implementation of Fortran.
    That may become available for posterity as well. Al wrote:

    Thank you for your letter of Dec 31, 2013. I have been a bit busy so did not have time to respond.

    I have attached the last build I did for the TIC C compiler, it was about 20 years ago. Unfortunately I lost the source code for the companion TASM assembler. Much of the work for the TIC C compiler was based on the public domain 68000 C compiler that was in circulation at the time (even though it was a bit buggy). Paul Charlton at the time sent me some code he was working on from the same source baseline that was helpful, as well as Clint Pulley's testing it for me.

    The 99 FORTRAN source code will take me a little longer to get together. The build is much larger and includes many function libraries, a lot which were contributed by Elmer Clausen.
    I think Al more than deserves to be inducted into the TI hall of fame (http://www.ti99hof.org/).

    Paul

  8. #648

    Default

    I fully agree there! He was a great long-term supporter of the TI, and the fact that he kept copies of most of his code preserved says volumes of good in addition to what was already known! Let me know how you want to transfer the files and I'll arrange to get them up on WHT. We might also want to put some kind of message from him with the data to show that he's given his permission to post it.

  9. #649

    Default Ti-c

    Quote Originally Posted by Ksarul View Post
    Let me know how you want to transfer the files and I'll arrange to get them up on WHT.
    Thanks for the offer! The files are with Don O'Neil of WHTech and he has promised to have them uploaded later this week.

    Paul

  10. #650
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Near Hindhead, Hampshire. UK
    Posts
    162

    Default

    Has somebody given him the "lost" issues 1, 5 & 8 of the user magazine ?

    I've also got all the 5.25" disk images and scans of documentation from MPE that I've done so far.

    Jim

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