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Thread: MS-DOS on Intel Mac

  1. #1

    Default MS-DOS on Intel Mac

    Hey guys,

    I want to impress my friends. They are all running Linux and stuff on their PCs, and one even has Linux on a Mac. I want to natively run MS-DOS on my Mac. I downloaded a boot CD for DOS 6.22, but the CD drivers didn't seem to work correctly, and when I opened up QBASIC and pressed option (alt), it froze up the computer entirely. Surely if my MacBook can run Windows XP and Vista (and maybe 7 at this point?), it can run MS-DOS! What can I do to make it work? I would preferably like to partition <1GB on my hard drive for it to boot to at some point.

    Thanks!

    Kyle

  2. #2

    Default

    It's...unlikely that you'll get this to work. Windows and Linux can run fine on an x86 Macintosh because both are designed to be only loosely tied to a particular hardware architecture (Windows is more closely tied than Linux, but still loose enough to be workable.) DOS, on the other hand, is just about the opposite. Technically, it might be possible to have a DOS implementation run on a non-PC x86 architecture, such that well-behaved DOS applications (ones that don't rely on direct hardware and BIOS access) would run correctly. The problem is, there is basically no such animal as a well-behaved DOS application. You might get it to work via a virtual-machine approach like Windows's VDM, but I would guess that there's basically no chance of running it natively.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  3. #3
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    What about giving FreeDos a shot?
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  4. #4

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    Again, probably not. The problem isn't so much in the implementation of the OS; the DOS services are pretty simple and easy to adapt to whatever happens to be in the system. The problem is that applications make a huge number of assumptions about what hardware will be where and what memory corresponds to devices like the VGA adapter, and they make no attempt whatsoever to work with any non-standard arrangements.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  5. #5
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    The only "non-PC" about intel Mac is hte use of EFI vs. bios. Other than that, they are standard x86 PC designs (the first rounds were Intel reference designs, even).
    However, since EFI isn't bios, there might be some missing parts, that MS-DOS / FreeDOS depends on.
    Here is one blog who claims that it is possible:
    http://randomcomputerbits.blogspot.c...-on-intel.html
    Torfinn

  6. #6
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    Didn't one of the early Windows-on-Intel-Mac solutions provide a BIOS <-> EFI go-between?

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tingo View Post
    The only "non-PC" about intel Mac is hte use of EFI vs. bios. Other than that, they are standard x86 PC designs (the first rounds were Intel reference designs, even).
    However, since EFI isn't bios, there might be some missing parts, that MS-DOS / FreeDOS depends on.
    If that's the only difference, it should be possible to create a drop-in BIOS replacement that would fill the gap. Color me surprised!
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
    Synthesizers: Roland JX-10/SH-09/MT-32/D-50, Yamaha DX7-II/V50/TX7/TG33/FB-01, Korg MS-20 Mini/ARP Odyssey/DW-8000/X5DR, Ensoniq SQ-80, E-mu Proteus/2, Moog Satellite, Oberheim SEM
    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  8. #8

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    Professor Wikipedia suggests that "All current Macintosh systems are also able to boot BIOS Operating Systems such as Windows XP and Vista," seemingly because of BIOS support being present in the firmware.

    Whether or not it will cooperate with DOS isn't clear.
    Enthusiast of keyboards with springs which buckle noisily.

  9. #9

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    Without looking it up I thought they added some stupid hypervisor to their x86 systems to pretend like you needed to run OSX and nothing else? Am I just wrong or was that removed or modded? I've seen it a few times also which threw me for a loop but don't have the money nor am a Mac fan so haven't experienced it myself.
    Looking to acquire: IBM 5100, Altair 8800

  10. #10

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    So I tried booting from an original Win98 2nd Ed. disk and it didn't load the CD drivers. It still allowed me to view the files on the disk. However, my Vista disk loaded just fine. Quite strange! It's like something drastic changed along the way from Win98 to XP/Vista/7.

    Kyle

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