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Thread: Anyone remember the early 1990's PC Manufacturer "PC Brand"

  1. #1

    Default Anyone remember the early 1990's PC Manufacturer "PC Brand"

    They were sold @ Sam's Club.

    It was the first PC I bought as a tyke. The 'neat-o' factor was that they proclaimed to be easily upgradable. To upgrade the CPU, all you had to do was take out the front bezel and then unlatch the removable "CPU card" which was encased in a metal box.

    I'm trying my best to do google searches.. but with a generic name like "PC Brand" I'm comming up with a lot of false hits.
    Last edited by Mike 01Hawk; April 5th, 2006 at 07:16 AM.

  2. #2
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    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl..._2/ai_12162543

    It's not much but I found the above link.

    Nathan
    The ancients knew *more* than us...
    http://www.legendarytimes.com/forum/index.php They're baaaack!

    Come and see http://www.gamegavel.com for all your gaming needs! We have Zero-ohm resistors!

  3. #3

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    AH HA!! It was called "Positive Corporation"

    My dear Watson, we have more to go on!

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl..._2/ai_11680292

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...v9/ai_10614393

  4. #4
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    Wow, talk about pushing the FUD (fear, uncertainty and doubt) buttons.

    I especially liked this quote;

    "The fear of obsolescence has traditionally forced the PC customer to overbuy," said Bryan Kerr, Positive Corporation's executive vice president.

    "With our replaceable CPU cartridge, we are providing the end user with an insurance policy that says you can save now, by buying only what you need today. You can upgrade your PC Positive, whenever you're ready, by investing a few hundred dollars instead of a few thousand," he added.

    That sounds like Intel's marketeing scheme for it's "overdrive" processors a couple of years later.

    Typical vaporware approach, think up a gimmick whereby you can charge a hefty premium for an "easily upgradeable" machine. Then never deliver or deliver very late on the "upgrade"

    I also notice this guy harps on the CPU upgrade and never mentions the antiquated, (even then!) 16 bit ISA bus or the 30 or 70 pin typically 80-100 ns SIMMs that would be I/O bound with a faster processor.

    The company that I work for bought a dual 200 mhz (1MB cache) pentium pro server for a program that I worked on. This was when PPros were being firesold and PII was coming out, 1997 maybe? However, they paid a premium for it, because it would be "upgradeable to the 333 Mhz Overdrive". Intel finally got around to releasing the overdrive in like early '99. They bought some and "upgraded" the machine. It ran slower. It was basically a PII desktop CPU core stuffed into socket 8. The extra 133 Mhz wasn't enough to overcome the lack of cache. IIRC They didn't get a faster machine until the PIII450 and the Xeons.

  5. #5

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    I bought an ALR 386 way back when because it offered CPU upgrades to stave off obsolescence. When it came time to upgrade the machine to a 486 I found that the replacement processor card (proprietary, of course) would have cost me about as much as a new 486 machine!

    Needless to say, I didn't go down that road again.

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    I picked up an ALR server a few years back, that was only a year old, but obsolete because the company went under. The machine was a low-end Pentium. It came with only one processor board, but s'pozed to be scalable to two or four cpus, but of course, none are available. I picked up the machine dirt-cheap from the recycler, and gave it to a friend who's still using it today, AFAIK.

    --T
    Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
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    Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

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    ok, does anyone remember CPU (Computer Products United). Made the world's only (AFAIK) 80186 based "100%" compatible. What about AMT (Advance Micro Technology?), producers of the ATjr. Big Blue made them change the name (became the AMTjr - got one), and pull the ads with the kid in the Charlie Chaplin getup. While mine was working, it did say "ATjr" on the bios boot screen or whatever it was. Plainest most vanilla peecee you ever seen, but still PRETTY COOL!
    And of course none of us could forget PCs Limited. Oi became Dell.

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    i remember those Cyrix486 chips. they were't too bad a cpu. I remember beefing up and old Zenith Data Systems 386dx with one and it ran Win 95 pretty good.

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    Yeah, I'm in the market for a DLC chip, if anybody has one...

    --T
    Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
    _____________________________________________

    Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Starshadow
    i remember those Cyrix486 chips. they were't too bad a cpu. I remember beefing up and old Zenith Data Systems 386dx with one and it ran Win 95 pretty good.
    Like this one?

    http://www.ubertechworld.com/museum/...isc_images.htm



    -VK

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