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Thread: Today my wife...

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Fl
    Posts
    473

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    Tezza, I agree with you. I got into collecting because I enjoyed seeing the old stuff run again. I really do not care if I ever get my money back (not that I have spent a whole lot). I think a lot of people are like me retired or ready to retire and enjoy revisting some of the old days.

    My wife thinks I am crazy also "for dragging all that junk back to the house"

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy View Post
    My wife thinks I am crazy also "for dragging all that junk back to the house"
    At least yours are ALLOWED in the house. Every time I suggest I could set up some of my pristine models as "coversation pieces" in the lounge, the temperature lowers a few degrees ...and I'm not talking about the weather here!

    I tend to mention it every time I want to tease Annette. A bit like throwing a stone into a pond to see the ripples..lol

    I don't mind though. I'm happy to play with them in my computer shack. In our next house move the plan is to have a dedicated display room.

    Tez
    ------------------------------------------------
    My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
    My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
    Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)


  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by retrobits View Post
    Tez has a very interesting point - buying even one of the expensive units is probably cheaper than a premium vacation. Some people's hobbies, like owning a boat, RC aircraft, RV, jeep, etc. can be quite expensive. By comparison, vintage computing is reasonably cheap, even with the rising prices.
    Yes. If you think of a hobby like golf. That can be really expensive. You have clubs, maybe lessons, course membership and fees, travel to the course, drinks in the clubhouse for you and your friends. You can't resell any of this. So what's the payoff? It's the mental and physical challenge of the sport...the satisfaction of playing a good round...and the social payoff through camaradarie, friendships and interactions with other people. An indefinable value but obviously worth it to those who participate.

    So, vintage computing. Inexpensive to get into compared to the above. Collecting can be part of it, where the aim is to tinker around with some old machines..possibly ressurect them. The payoff: Enjoyment and mental stimulation...the satisfaction of fixing, displaying or finding something. And the social payoff through camaradarie, friendship and interactions with like minded people. Cheap at the price!

    On a related point, Earl, in the latest Retro Computing Round Table you pondered on why prices are rising. Charlie pointed to a possible reason. The babyboomers are getting close to retirement age. They want to revisit those things that may have engaged them in younger days. If you have some savings, a few hundred bucks is not a lot compared to other ways you might spend your time. This may be a factor in rising demand for those classic models.

    Tez
    Last edited by tezza; May 2nd, 2012 at 02:22 PM.
    ------------------------------------------------
    My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
    My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
    Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)


  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by tezza View Post
    So, vintage computing. Inexpensive to get into compared to the above. Collecting can be part of it, where the aim is to tinker around with some old machines..possibly ressurect them. The payoff: Enjoyment and mental stimulation...the satisfaction of fixing, displaying or finding something. And the social payoff through camaradarie, friendship and interactions with like minded people. Cheap at the price!
    I couldn't agree more. I am an ASP.NET developer by trade. While I love what I do I still feel like all of the abstraction doesn't allow me to know what is really going on inside the computer. These computers of yester-year allow us to really get intimate and it is entirely possible for a person to know everything there is to know about one model or another.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Fl
    Posts
    473

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    Tezza:

    You are right, I am a boomer. I still had a couple of IBM's 5150's and 5160's in the junk room at work, but I have purchased some parts and software that I wanted. I am sure I overpaid for some of the items I bought.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy View Post
    Tezza:

    You are right, I am a boomer. I still had a couple of IBM's 5150's and 5160's in the junk room at work, but I have purchased some parts and software that I wanted. I am sure I overpaid for some of the items I bought.
    Yea, me too Charlie. I kinda squeeze in at the END of the baby-boomer period so I've still got a few years at the coal-face to go. I'm looking forward to the time I can devote more time to this hobby though.

    Tez
    ------------------------------------------------
    My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
    My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
    Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)


  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    NorthWest England (East Pondia)
    Posts
    1,844
    Blog Entries
    10

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    When my wife comments, I always say that Harry, my cousins husband will lend me one of his farm tractors to restore....

    I quite fancy one like this:-

    http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/1927563

    that I drovr on the local farms as a youth
    Dave
    G4UGM

    Looking for Analog Computers, Drum Plotters, and Graphics Terminals

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Des Moines, IA USA
    Posts
    324

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    My wife is unbelievably patient with my hobby. She even pretends to listen when I prattle on about the 4016 I just repaired!

    I would have to say there's an important financial component to my hobby. Every once in a while I sell something, which helps me to buy something else I'm wanting. For example, I've got 2 PET 8032s to fix. Once repaired, I will probably sell one on ebay, and the PETvet and PETdisk I'm buying will have paid for itself and then some.

    Oh, and Earl, welcome to the ranks of what my wife calls my "imaginary friends". I'm hooked on several podcasts on the TWiT network, and I'm known for going around the house saying "Steve Gibson says...." and "Leo Laporte says..." Now I've just found Retrobits! Great fun!
    Last edited by KevinO; May 5th, 2012 at 08:06 PM.
    "Manning the earliest spacecraft, flying an aeroplane, with only one propeller to keep you in the sky. Can you imagine that?" -Jean-Luc Picard

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sheffield, England
    Posts
    188

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    Saw this thread and felt i'd add my bit

    I agree with a lot of whats already been said. Especially regarding what collecting is worth to each and every one of us. For me, it's not about the money. I dont have the room for a huge collection, but the machines I do have. Where bought because I had either used them while growing up or because i just wanted to mess with one. My hobby is getting a 286 and finding a modern use for it, try get it online that sort of thing, write an article on my blog documenting all i did playing around to get something to work. I guess its an acquired taste old computers.

    I find the hobby fun, living in England, the BBC micro was big over here, especially in schools. It's the first micro I've owned, where a hand books encourages you to take the lid of and fiddle, hack and modify bits your computer. Totally unheard of in modern machines, the technical side has been removed from the equations. Which has taken the fun out of it.

    I feel lucky that my partner is a patient woman, who not only finds my ramblings about vintage tech amusing, but will also come and see what i'm playing with. She loves old games and is the only female Mig user in our local Amiga club, also probably the only member to bring an A600 along to meet ups too
    I've been told eventually when we have our own place, I'm having my own room for all the bits and they are not allowed anywhere else..Especially in pieces on the kitchen side at 3am, with me hunched over soldering something back together...Hey the kitchen has great lighting!
    Collection thus far:
    A500, A500+, A600, A3000, A1200, A1200T, CD32, ZX Spectrum, 128k +A & +B, C64, Apple Macintosh Plus, Classic, Sharp Pc-7200, IBM-PC360, Powermac 8500.

  10. #20

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    I don't collect for money at all, actually, Vintage Computing was about the exact opposite for me. I did not get into it as a hobby, but rather - I was 18, could not find a job, wanted internet, a 486 can get on the internet, and 486's are $10 a pair at Salvation Army (circa 2001), so buy 2, take the best bits from both, build one good fast one, put the most modern Windows on it possible, and run it into the ground. That's where it all started for me....that and because for about 12 years, I vowed I would get a bigger, better, faster 486 than my sister's 386 that caused so much family drama with repairs (that I was always the scapegoat for). I'd say I conqered both goals.

    Now I just use them for retro-gaming, and I"ve rather well stopped collecting and just have 4 old machines I'm a caretaker and upgrader of - a Tandy 1000, a 286, a 486, and a Mac SE FDHD, all but the Mac are souped up about as far as their little 60-200 watt power supplies can handle. I got out of the game as soon as I started seeing such boxes on fleabay for $150.00 a pop. It just defeated the purpose to me....from being a almost "Free" hobby to costing me large sums to get some obscure hard-to-find piece of hardware to make a 15+ year old PC work the way I want it to.

    My woman gave me a Man Cave for all my stuff, I feel lucky. About the only thing I get any grief for is the time it takes to fix/tweak something so we can do something with said hardware. Thankfully a few hours last night with her sleeping gave me the time to get everything fixed better than ever. Hopefully some Turkey Day gaming is in order once I get everything on the Tandy.

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