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Thread: My first free computer :D

  1. #1

    Thumbs up My first free computer :D

    I walk into this computer selling/repairing store and saw this stack of various computers. Most were scrapped out P4 systems, and then I saw the back of this one and saw an AT keyboard port. It was the only computer with all its innards and expansion cards in it.

    I asked the guy whats up with that pile of computers and he said that he was gonna recycle them, so I asked how much he would sell me one for. He said that he couldn't sell them (aww...) but he could give them away (YESSS!!). So I took off with the computer with the AT style motherboard, and it turns out that it is a Pentium 133 with 32mb of ram and a 4gb hard drive. It has a ceramic cpu (cool, that's interesting compared to my other CPUs)

    So I look at the motherboard and its an Asus motherboard, and it has AT and ATX power connectors on it, which is weird and cool at the same time.

    So I put DOS 6.22 on it, so it could be a dos machine, and my other pentium mmx 200 could be a win98 machine, and the sound card (an ISA aztech of some sort) will do sound blaster sounds without drivers. thats really odd, I thought dos was a real turd about drivers.

    well, wanted to show off the awesomeness that is a free computer :P

    DSCN0319.jpg

    Edit: also It has one slightly bulging cap below the CPU, its through hole soldered so it will be easy to replace when I get to it, but for now it works.
    Last edited by Tr3vor; May 14th, 2012 at 05:35 PM.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tr3vor View Post
    I walk into this computer selling/repairing store and saw this stack of various computers. Most were scrapped out P4 systems, and then I saw the back of this one and saw an AT keyboard port. It was the only computer with all its innards and expansion cards in it.
    Congratulations! It's always fun to get a new baby. That generation is starting to get more interesting as time goes by. In my opinion it's also the perfect DOS machine for real performance.

    BTW: what you're referring to as "AT keyboard port" is normally called DIN and those plugs are very much used for all kinds of things. In Europe they are (were?) standard for all consumer audio. The PS2 plugs are actually a "mini DIN" and, outside of the IBM PS2 world, usually referred to as such.
    WANTED: Cardinal 2450MNP modem.

  3. #3

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    yeah, I like my pentiums, they seem to run pretty much everything. the only thing I want is an ibm XT or AT computer for those programs/games that are too old to run on the pentium computers.

    Some people say they ain't vintage or whatever, but they are my vintage :P

  4. #4
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    Free computers are the best ones to get. Congrats.

    As for ps/2 ports. It's been perfectly acceptable to call them that for as long as I've been using computers and the computer industry it seems- http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=PS%...ient=firefox-a
    Last edited by Caluser2000; May 14th, 2012 at 10:01 PM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  5. #5
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    there are some older games "Jazz Jackrabbit" for one, that will see the sound card with out drivers, it does that with my old skool awe32 "Full Length non-plug and play" But yes, dos can be a real douche-bag where drivers are concerned..
    JOZXYQK[/B][/B]

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by k2x4b524[ View Post
    there are some older games "Jazz Jackrabbit" for one, that will see the sound card with out drivers, it does that with my old skool awe32 "Full Length non-plug and play" But yes, dos can be a real douche-bag where drivers are concerned..
    yeah, I'm playing Wolf3d, doom, and pretty much any game without drivers with sound, its pretty cool :P

  7. #7

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    I'm a little puzzled by the difficulty of finding drivers. DOS generally doesn't need them because it talks to the hardware. At least that's how I've experienced DOS in the last 25 years of continuously using it. Network cards need them though, and it can be a challenge to find one that is respectably small since the manufacturers generally don't care about stuff like that.
    WANTED: Cardinal 2450MNP modem.

  8. #8

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    That is a nice SEXY case! And on an unrelated note, the rubix cube needs to be finished.
    It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole Juul View Post
    I'm a little puzzled by the difficulty of finding drivers. DOS generally doesn't need them because it talks to the hardware.
    What about memory management, ram disks, cdroms/dvds, parrallel port devices such as zip/LS drives, usb and ansi support?

    "DOS control of hardware

    DOS is quite simple to describe, since it principally consists of only 4 parts:

    # A boot record, which activates the operating system.

    # The file IO.SYS, which is interfaced to ROM BIOS with installation of device drivers .

    # The file MSDOS.SYS. That is the core of DOS, handling the file system and program execution.

    # The file COMMAND.COM, which provides the command line, the text based user interface.

    When we talk about hardware control, it is done through IO.SYS. That is a program which reads the ROM BIOS code and converts it to DOS's own device drivers.

    The smart thing about DOS is that the operating system can be expanded with external device drivers. IO.SYS reads them via the start-up file CONFIG.SYS. First device drivers are read from ROM BIOS. Then any possible additional drivers are read from disk. In that way DOS can handle hardware units which did not exist when the PC was originally configured.

    A final option to handle hardware from DOS programs is to write special drivers for the individual user program . Many DOS games come with their own graphics drivers (they have to recognize all graphics standards on the market!). Another classic example is the word processing program WordPerfect, which in its prime (version 5.1) came with drivers to more than 500 different printers! "
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Caluser2000 View Post
    As for ps/2 ports. It's been perfectly acceptable to call them that for as long as I've been using computers and the computer industry it seems-
    I don't think I've heard ps/2 ports called anything else either. However, regarding the connector, didn't the OP have a 5 pin DIN?

    Quote Originally Posted by Caluser2000
    What about memory management, ram disks, cdroms/dvds, parrallel port devices such as zip/LS drives, usb and ansi support?
    Good point. I didn't think about memory management since I generally include that in utilities which is pretty much covered by Simtel or PCmag. I have had problems finding a driver for a zip disk (in fact never did relocate a version of guest.exe that worked). Still cdroms are pretty new to DOS and a generic driver will work now. A few years ago they weren't very common - I certainly couldn't afford one.

    USB support? That's for DOS? I didn't think they had those until win95 came along.

    ANSI support? Oh come on. Stick nansi.sys in your config and be done with it. I would hope you wouldn't have to go looking for that sort of thing.

    In any case, I personally haven't had to go looking for drivers, and just wanted to convey that one can be a perfectly happy DOS user without going through the torture that some chose to endure.

    Quote Originally Posted by Caluser2000
    The smart thing about DOS is that the operating system can be expanded with external device drivers. IO.SYS reads them via the start-up file CONFIG.SYS. First device drivers are read from ROM BIOS. Then any possible additional drivers are read from disk. In that way DOS can handle hardware units which did not exist when the PC was originally configured.
    From my understanding, that was indeed what made DOS the winner when they added that facility.
    WANTED: Cardinal 2450MNP modem.

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