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Thread: Seagate ST01 SCSI Host Adapter, 16K ROM Version 3.3

  1. #11
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    Well, it's not fast. But 8-bit SCSI solutions are kind of limited anyway.

    The ST01 basically uses a TI workalike of the NCR 53C400 chip, which in turn, is nothing more than an NCR 5380 with ISA interface logic and a bit of local SRAM for buffering and scratchpad. I do mean "a bit"--the chip doesn't have enough memory to hold a single 512 byte sector.

    So draw your own conclusions.

  2. #12

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    Hmm, thanks. I don't know enough about SCSI to really draw much conclusion unfortunately!

  3. #13
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    If you are stuck with an 8 bit bus (PC/XT) how fast does the SCSI need to be anyway.
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  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    If you are stuck with an 8 bit bus (PC/XT) how fast does the SCSI need to be anyway.
    Good question. The problem with SCSI, particularly the narrow kind is that it's high latency; that is, it takes a fair amount of dancing to get it going. That's why you see a lot of caching SCSI controllers for the 16-bit bus.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Good question. The problem with SCSI, particularly the narrow kind is that it's high latency; that is, it takes a fair amount of dancing to get it going. That's why you see a lot of caching SCSI controllers for the 16-bit bus.
    16 bit SCSI controllers with cache SIMM slots are kind of rare, do you mean there are models with some cache soldered on board? There were a few varieties for VLB , but they were 32bit.

    I could be wrong but I figured the cache SCSI cards were popular on slow CPU machines because the SCSI drives of the day didn't have much cache and the CPU could not keep up with the raw transfers so the cards just read data to cache and waited for the CPU to need it. It also helped the cards would cache the next block on the drive assuming the OS would ask for it next anyway (also sped up writes to disk as long as you didn't turn off the computer before the cache was written). Once systems used DMA (and RAM got cheap for use with smartdrive) caching controllers were pretty much just for servers.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
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  6. #16
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    One of the first 16-bit SCSI controllers I bought was the CSC FastCache--it had up to 10MB in SIMMs on it. Or consider the early WD7000 FASST controller--the thing was a memory pig but got decent performace. Take a look at the protocol timings for SCSI-1 and SCSI-2. SCSI is best suited to large transfer volumes.

  7. #17

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    Hi ST01/02 users!

    I have an ST02 (with floppy) and V3.2. Can sombody send me the Bios file of the latest version 3.3?

    Thanks guys!

    Cheers
    Dolby

  8. #18

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    I definitely need this card as is for my CP/M computer. I know that sounds crazy, but the CP/M computer uses a ST225N SCSI HD and this card will let me low level format the ST225N and do a bad sector analysis. What do you want for it?

    I might be able to find some vintage 8-bit sound cards in my "extras" box.

    Charles, clong6@jhu.edu
    Last edited by Charles; October 30th, 2012 at 12:11 PM.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles View Post
    I might be able to find some vintage 8-bit sound cards in my "extras" box.
    Turn up anything?

    To address the use of ROM 3.3 with the older ST01/ST02 boards, per the document I linked to in the parent post:

    "Addendum from the Seagate Tech Support BBS: The ST01/02 has a newer
    board layout that can be identified by the ROM BIOS chip with a
    version number 3.3 sticker.

    Unlike previous versions of the ST01/02, this release will support
    drives with more than 1024 cylinders and the ability to disable the
    floppy controller portion on the ST02. This provides compatibility
    with the Swift and Wren families of Seagate disc drives. Please note
    that there is no possibility of ROM upgrades to older versions of the
    ST01/02 SCSI host adapter
    ."

  10. #20

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    I have version 3.3, is in a 27128 eprom and works in older versions of ST01/02 cards. Desoldered
    v3.3 from the original card, make an eprom copy, put the copy in an old ST01/02 card and works well.

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