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Thread: Given AS/400 to sell, please assist

  1. #1

    Default Given AS/400 to sell, please assist

    I'm trying to identify what I've been given, but I don't know much about old servers. I have a box full of manuals, one of which says "Setting Up Your 940x Model 170 version 4", and I've narrowed down the type of server to an IBM eServer i5, I suppose? I've yet to get all the part numbers from the inside, but there appears to be 3 x 36GB SCSI harddrives and two power supplies. It also weighs enough to merit wheels integrated into the chassis (85 pounds, roughly). I can't find a place to plug in a standard VGA monitor and the motherboard's expansion slots are not standard PC slots, so none of my graphics cards will fit... I also have a very large, very heavy UPS system that goes with it, which is also about 45 pounds or so. It was pulled from a working environment with no issues, and still works. I don't know what to do with it, so I've decided to sell it.

    Can someone please assist me with what I have on my hands and approximately how much I should sell it for? I can provide pictures if that will help... Thank you wholeheartedly, in advance.

  2. #2
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    You never will find a place to plug in a monitor either. All AS/400 systems were strictly console-only.
    = Excellent space heater

  3. #3
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    Its not reall an "old server" its an IBM mid-range machine which probably ran OS/400 or the power-pc equivalent.

    If you don't have a console workstation then how do you know it works? If its a 940x it looks like these need a special console c all an HMC which is IBM proprietry and without it its pretty useless. You probably also would want the software installation media.

    I think unless you have some software and a console then the resale value will be low, or even nill. I suspect that this is one of those situations where something is worth more as pure scrap (It may be old enough to contain sgnificant amounts of gold) than as a going peice of kit.
    Dave
    G4UGM

    Looking for Analog Computers, Drum Plotters, and Graphics Terminals

  4. #4
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    Actually looking at the IBM I5 system handbook here:-

    http://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redpieces/pdfs/sg247486.pdf

    It looks like you can use a network PC provided you have the IBM Software.
    Dave
    G4UGM

    Looking for Analog Computers, Drum Plotters, and Graphics Terminals

  5. #5

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    I have code in that machine. I was on the team that did the low level operating system work for it when it was being developed.

    Don't bother trying to connect it to a VGA display. It needs a "5250" style terminal. It might have an option to use a PC as a terminal running over Ethernet, but that is difficult to setup. (If it even has Ethernet.)

    If you really want to unload it to a good home, look for an IBM "Business Partner" that specializes in the AS/400 (iSeries). There is a newsgroup ( Google groups link: https://groups.google.com/forum/?fro...ibm.as400.misc ) that you can use to ask for help too.

    Fun notes ..

    It is a variant of 64 bit PowerPC. The SCSI hard drives use 520 byte sector sizes instead of the usual 512 byte sector size. (The OS uses the extra 8 bytes.) I think our internal code-name for the processor was "Cobra" or "Cobra4." That particular model was a low end entry model for the AS/400.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by mbbrutman View Post
    I have code in that machine. I was on the team that did the low level operating system work for it when it was being developed
    That's really awesome! This forum seems like a pretty diverse group of people, I think I could learn a lot from you all.

    I just went to the storage and looked at the front of the case today, it says it's a "Type 9405-520" S/N 10-EADAC ... Is this the same thing as what I said above? Going to drag it in here and disassemble it for the P/N's and itemize them so I can present it to a buyer. Thanks again for the info, in advance.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by g4ugm View Post
    If you don't have a console workstation then how do you know it works?
    The server was being used until the day we migrated our data from it onto the new server and turned the old server off. So there's a hardware management console that I'm missing? All the workstations that were attached to it were IBM desktop's with XP Pro, the company that installed the server set it up and maintained it remotely.

  8. #8

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    We seem to have a mismatch here ... if you really have a 9405-520 that is a much much newer machine. Here are the specs:

    http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/po...20_landing.htm

    That has a relatively recent Power5 processor in it - less than 10 years old. That machine might have some real resale value - it's slow compared to the current Power7 based machines out there, but it's more than most of us need.


    Mike

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by mbbrutman View Post
    We seem to have a mismatch here ... if you really have a 9405-520 that is a much much newer machine. Here are the specs:

    http://pic.dhe.ibm.com/infocenter/po...20_landing.htm

    That has a relatively recent Power5 processor in it - less than 10 years old. That machine might have some real resale value - it's slow compared to the current Power7 based machines out there, but it's more than most of us need.


    Mike
    That's exactly what it looks like. It's quite heavy. The company that gave it to me had the invoice with three workstations on it and it came out to around $30K, but I can't recall how long ago it was. I think 2002 or 2003. I'm going to go itemize the parts on there and figure out how much RAM is in it. There's 2x36GB SCSI drives (i pulled the other two trays and they were empty)... I'll give an update, with pictures, here after a little while. Thanks so much, sir!

  10. #10

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    OK. From what I've gathered, this is an IBM eServer i5 - 9405 SF2 (Type 9405-520)

    It has:
    - 2 x 36GB 15,000RPM SCSI drives, with expansion for two more, or another add-in card for a total of 8.
    - 1GB (4 x 256MB) DDR266 ECC RAM sticks and 4 additional unused slots
    - 1 x 850W Power Supply, with a dedicated spot for a second
    - 1 x SLR60 30/60 Tape Drive and DVD Drive

    I'm not sure the processor(s). Below are the first set of images.
































    Additional images here: http://s41.photobucket.com/albums/e2...0-%209405-520/

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