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Thread: eprom programmers

  1. #1

    Default eprom programmers

    I've been putting off getting an eeprom programmer for quite a while now. Long story short, I just borked a working motherboard with the wrong bios. I now have 2 motherboards, a scsi card, and a video card that now need their eeproms examined.

    So I figure, I might as well get one. I was looking to get one of these: http://www.ebay.com/itm/221038304677 If their page can be believed, it supports all the chips that I want to mess with. Or should I invest in a better unit? I also realize I would need a UV eraser. as half the chips i'm using are the window style. 27c256's to be exact, so I was also going to get one of these: http://www.ebay.com/itm/120922088392

    I was also looking at this unit: http://www.ebay.com/itm/280933865106 I must admit, being able to play with ddr spi information does have its appeal.
    It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

  2. #2
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    Hi, I have one of the import EPROM programmers you show in the first link and it has worked OK for me. However I needed to also program the MCM68766 EPROM for my PC-Retro project (IBM PC Clone) so I bought a used BP-Microsystems EP-1140, and I run it from a Windows 95 box. The BP unit is a very solid commercial unit and I really like it alot. (Note that the import programmer on EBAY shows a USB plug, but that is only for supplying power.)

    I also bought one of the import UV eraser units in the second link and it worked OK for a couple of hours and stopped. I ended up taking the unit apart, doing diagnostics, looking for replacement bulbs and finally decided life was too short. So I bought a used Spectroline PE-14 and I have already used it for about 50 hours, no problems.

    A photo of my setup is attached.bpmicro.jpg

  3. #3
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    The Willems work pretty well;sadly, I think all the eBay ones from China are ripping off the creators of it.
    http://www.mcumall.com/comersus/stor...namicIndex.asp
    patscc

  4. #4
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    I also back the Willam's and the clones. They're fairly good. They can do NMOS chips as well.
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  5. #5
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    I don't think the Willems will do PALs and GALs (programmable logic), however.

  6. #6
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    The GQ-4X does.
    Look at the end of the list in the link.
    http://www.mcumall.com/comersus/stor...supportICs.asp
    patscc

  7. #7
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    I had in mind the 20- and 24-pin devices, such as GAL16V8--they're not JTAG-programmable. You find them all over the place in 80's devices.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I had in mind the 20- and 24-pin devices, such as GAL16V8--they're not JTAG-programmable. You find them all over the place in 80's devices.
    Yes I agree, and for new breadboards, PALs and GALs in 20 or 24 pin 'skinny DIP' packages take up little space without surface mount hassle. A must for any device programmer is to handle the PALCE22V10 and the GAL16V8 as they are electrically erasable for error prone guys like me. Also the GAL16V8 or PAL16V8 are very useful as a universal replacement of practically any bipolar PAL of from the 80's.
    -Dave

  9. #9

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    For testing purposes you can use 29c256 instead of 27c256. Same pinout but they are flash chips so no need to mess with UV erasing.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave_m View Post
    Yes I agree, and for new breadboards, PALs and GALs in 20 or 24 pin 'skinny DIP' packages take up little space without surface mount hassle. A must for any device programmer is to handle the PALCE22V10 and the GAL16V8 as they are electrically erasable for error prone guys like me. Also the GAL16V8 or PAL16V8 are very useful as a universal replacement of practically any bipolar PAL of from the 80's.
    -Dave
    Is this much of an issue? I have only one device with what look like a pal/gal. I'm not planning on messing with it anytime in the near future. If the first programmer wont program these, can you recommend one that will? I believe pat mentioned the GQ-4X. While they look more professional, they also ring in at a full c-note in price.
    It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

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