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Thread: TRS-80 model II boot disk

  1. #1

    Default TRS-80 model II boot disk

    Hello Everyone,

    Today I've picked up some old computer material.

    a TRS-80 model II with manual and spare keyboard,
    TRS-80 printer (still in the car), Tree 8" drives, a box
    of 8" disks and some cabeling. I'd pay 120 euro's because
    the TRS was not working. Also the FDD drives are state unknown.
    One drive is missing it's PCB. But I still think it is was not too expensive.

    TRS80 model II.jpg

    But the machine won't boot. It sometimes gives the message:
    "Boot error DC" and sometimes "Boot error TK".
    So I'm afraid the bootdisk is damaged.

    Can anyone help me get such a disk?

    Thanks in Advance!

    Regards, Roland

  2. #2
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    Default

    Have you done the usual, like clean the drive heads, clean and lubricate the rails... ?
    patscc

  3. #3

    Default

    Hello patscc,

    Yes I did and also replaced some caps.
    But I can not check if it's the drive
    or the bootdisk at this moment.

    Regards, Roland

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Huisman View Post
    Hello patscc,

    Yes I did and also replaced some caps.
    But I can not check if it's the drive
    or the bootdisk at this moment.


    Regards, Roland
    Roland:

    Back in the day when I actually used the Model II at my work place (early 80's), we were constantly having to create boot disks. The reason was if the user left the diskette in the PC, or extension bay drives, it would get zapped when you powered the system down. You had to make sure to remove the disk prior to shutting down. Also, you need to check the felt tension pad(s) on you drive(s). They are about the size of a pencil eraser and can kill a diskette real fast if let to wear down. You can Google for the software - there's plenty of user forums out there. Good luck.

  5. #5

    Default

    "If the user left the diskette in the PC, or extension bay
    drives, it would get zapped when you powered the system down"
    Wow, this sounds like a serious design fault...
    Were they magnetic destroyed and could they be reformatted?
    Or were the disks mechanically damaged?

    Regards, Roland

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Huisman View Post
    Wow, this sounds like a serious design fault...
    Were they magnetic destroyed and could they be reformatted?
    Or were the disks mechanically damaged?

    Regards, Roland
    If I remember correcly, only the boot track was zapped, and there was no physical/permanent damage done. BTW, we paid about $8 each for those 8" disks back then. Everything had to be sourced from Radio Shack.

  7. #7
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    I believe I made a couple of posts on adding a header to the controller board and using it to run a 3.5" drive and booting from said drive. I have a Model 16, but that's pretty much a Model II with 68K boards added. You do need the late-model controller to pull this trick off.

  8. #8
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    BOOT ERROR DC suggests that the drive controller timing(s) need adjustment... but it would be better to try a format of an empty disk first... one would need the manual (and an oscilloscope) to properly set the controller.

    Looks like a GREAT find and I would be SO jelly if I had enough room for one myself!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roland Huisman View Post
    Wow, this sounds like a serious design fault...
    Were they magnetic destroyed and could they be reformatted?
    Or were the disks mechanically damaged?

    Regards, Roland
    No, actually it was a 'common design fault'. Users KNEW that the machines were 'pure evil' and would mess with you at every turn!
    Seriously tho... it was EXPECTED of the user to follow the instructions, connection procedures, and 'rules'.... 'Idiot-proofing' came later, when we got too busy to 'think'.

  10. #10
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    Isn't the Model II the one with the strange loop-back drive termination? (The Model 16 doesn't use it). Might be your problem there. Seems as if we went through this with Lorne a few moons ago.

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