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Thread: Frankin PS/1

  1. #1
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    Default Frankin PS/1

    Instead of completely hijacking another members thread I thought I'd start another on the progress or not of an IBM PS/1 Model 2155-V76 (SL-B)- has a 486SX33 processor and mobo proudly stating it was made in the UK. The mobo is an IBM FRU 73G0774 happily takes 64megs of non-parity/parity 72 pin FP ram.

    This thing has a broken flip down cover hinge-no biggy-and all the useful bits n bobs stripped out apart from the CPU. Not that that is a very flash or desirable item anyway. So no ram, hdd or fdd. What I'm I to do?- toss a 16 meg simm stick in it, along with my trusty Ye Olde World IDE 40 meg testing hdd and a fdd I just happen to have loafing on the table of course. First mod was to drill a hole in the VGA output so it'd accept the cable from my P96 crt. I tried a Trident card in one of the isa slots but nothing on the screen. No dought there's a jumper on the mobo to disable the on board video and I could've found a ref on the interweb. It was quicker to drill than do an internet search anyway. Now it's ready for any more modern SVGA screen cable.

    Turned it on beeb-beeb cmos battery low error(easily replaced), date error then prompted to enter the bios settings, which I did then press ESC to except the settings and reboot. Up came Direct Access in all its glory-Goodie!!.

    The machine was missing riser holder/central strut for want of a better description and fdd cage as you can see below. My initial thought was BLAH!-it's just another 486, albeit with I-B-M on the front, biff the bloody thing and be done with it. Then a stroke of genius hit me on the head like a pumkin being hit with a sledge hammer (doesn't happen often according to wifey)-why not see if I can made use of the Packard Bell bits laying ready for the crusher!

    Spent few hours altering the central riser holder/centre strut and fdd/hdd cage out of the left over PB bits. Just one more mod to the strut tomorrow including some holes for secure it along with the cage to the frame and it'll be done. As with spur of the moment projects there was a few "shivers why did I do that!" moments but all in all it's coming along quite nicely. Hadn't done anything like this for years, so quite enjoyed getting out the angle grinder, dremel, file and rubber mallet. Something about a shower of sparks which is quite appealing. To hold stop the riser from wobbling about I inserted and screwed an old ISA modem into the top ISA slot.

    Anyone know the thread form for the component securing screws in these PCs at all? There's a good selection of taps and dies at work and it would look nicer than self tapping screws. Not that you'd notice them with the cover on.

    Of course it's not completely genuine I-B-M now so it's not going to fetch a zillion dollars and pay off the mortgage. It will make a good machine for easily testing 72 pin FP simms.
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    Last edited by Caluser2000; July 6th, 2013 at 10:40 PM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  2. #2
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    Flogged a coin battery out of a late model mobo gathering dust in the garage and attacked the thing with an air duster. I've added pics of my handy work to the OP. The PB support was originally straight and I had to take out about half the width from of the support from the front rearwards about 6 inchs to give clearance for the fdd. An hdd can be mounted underneath or on under the lower 51/4" drive bay if needed. There is also plenty of room to mount a drive on the front face or (2.5" drive) in front of the mobo.
    Last edited by Caluser2000; July 7th, 2013 at 11:00 AM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

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    Knowing everyone at VCF was waiting for the next exciting installment on Frankin PS/1 here goes:

    With the aid of a battery drill, rat tail file, a few screws and a bit of news print the cage is mounted along with an fdd. Pics below. Yes folks that's an authenic MS Home watch you see sitting on the rh modem I used as bracing. It must be worth zillions. Now to sort out hdd and cd/cdr drive. My intention is to install DR-Dos/Novell Dos on the thing just as a point difference from the usual MS fare. Of course that could change. As I mentioned earlier this beasty takes a mammoth 64megs of ram so other premium OSs aren't out of the question.

    Having gotten real intimate with the thing it hasn't had a good life with the back end being a wee bit out of shape. It's a bit better now though.

    Anyway I'm happy with the results.

    Also set up the Acer Across for when the Grandson turns up. He loves playing Dos games which gives Grandma a bit of quiet time.

    Toodle pip, onwards and upwards and all that, ah what.
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    Last edited by Caluser2000; July 20th, 2013 at 10:26 PM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

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    Just been having a play with this thing. Slapped a 2.1 gig Quantum Fire Ball ST hdd I'd prepared about 12 months ago on the CDS 524 expecting it to throw a paddy because the bios only reports it as a 12mg drive. No apparent way of setting hd/cyls/etc either at first glance. Bloody surprised Windows 95 booted up. No DDO magic required at all. Ran hardware detection and picked up everything installed, which isn't that much really.

    Damn I'm disappointed.
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    Last edited by Caluser2000; August 23rd, 2013 at 10:59 PM. Reason: Added hdd model details
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

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    Last night I decided to test out the 3.5" 1.44meg MS Dos 6.22/Wfw 3.11 disks I got a few weeks ago so ran a full install routine on them so all disks could be accessed, including networking with tcpip32b and a Genius Lan nic ( after setting that to jumperless then running the config. utility to set the address etc). Went well. I connected up a piece thin net cable along with the required Ts and terminators, between it and the Compaq CDS 524, ran ftpsrv and the wfws ftp client. Connected up fine. Couldn't have been simpler.

    The Hyperace 586 upgrade turned up today. Now I have to decide what system I toss this into. The manual makes interesting reading with some handy tips for this era machine in general.
    Last edited by Caluser2000; August 25th, 2013 at 09:58 PM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  6. #6
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    I'm with ya!

    If the choice is between tossing as junk and rehabilitating with a little metal coercion, I'll do the latter.

    My wife complained about the slowness of her IBM Netvista 6790 desktop. This is a socket 478 1.8GHz/400FSB equipped job with about a gig of PC133 SDRAM--not DDR. The board is IBM-peculiar, so there's very little technical information on it. I could have upgraded to a Northwood 3GHz/400 but she'd still be stuck with the SDRAM and 400 FSB. She really likes the small form-factor desktop case--underneath her display, the height is perfect.

    I decided on a more drastic course than a simple CPU swap.

    She insisted on a floppy drive and I didn't want to struggle with fitting a USB drive in the case, so I picked up a Biostar socket AM3 mATX board with CPU for $25. It still has legacy floppy. parallel and COM port and can use DDR2 1066 SDRAM. It's a bit smaller than the original motherboard (not as deep), but also has 6xSATA 8xUSB2 as well as IDE support and onboard video.

    The IBM case, as all things IBM, is a bit strange. The I/O shield is nonstandard (1 7//8 tall) and is actually attached to the motherboard. Underneath the CPU was a blivet formed from the inner case cover probably meant to be a heatsink for the bottom of the PCB. Unfortunately, that wasn't going to work with the Biostar board, so I got out my oscillating saw with a flush-cut metal blade and cut that bugger right off. A touch up with some emery paper and a spritz of clear lacquer completed the job.

    The IDE hard drive (I dug out an old Seagate 7200 RPM Barracuda 80GB job to replace her Deathstar 40GB drive) and DVD writer have an odd cabling setup. Remember that this motherboard has only one IDE header--the hard drive is oriented below and 90 degrees with respect to the DVD drive. A conventional 80-conductor IDE cable wouldn't work--there's too much distance required between the primary and secondary connectors. So turned the cable end-for end, putting the normally-CPU side on the DVD and the master connector on the IDE drive--that left enough of the cable to plug into the motherboard.

    The original system had a SATA adapter board in it to handle backups to her external drive, but I took a VGA bracket and mounted an eSATA connector cable on it and plugged it into the motherboard. An old parallel header-to-DB25 connector handled the printer, with a custom-made bracket (took the longest of anything).

    2GB of DDR2-800 SDRAM finished up the assembly.

    I still have to crimp a new connector to the lead to the front-panel USB receptacles (the original used 2 mm spacing), but my wife is thrilled with how fast her system is now--I kept hearing "wow" when she was trying it out.

    It certainly would have been simpler to buy something off the shelf, but it would have been unfamiliar to her and she would have lost an old friend in that IBM case that said that it was certified for Windows 2000.

    So you do what you have to, to keep folks happy.

  7. #7
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    Indeed, I understand the liking for small form factor. Quite partial to them myself. Had a real nice 286 Compaq system many years back that was passed around various family members.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  8. #8
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    Thinking out loud- Hmmm, I do have a smaller ISA riser card, and have enough RicsPC casings to fit it and the IBM mobo in to. Install OS/2 and really have people confused when they fire the thing up. Folk have been known to throw RiscPC components into ATX cases but I've never heard of the reverse being done.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

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