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Thread: Need help with deciding what to build

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvanK View Post
    Sigh...
    To me, any computer that is too old to run a currently supported and popular operating system is vintage. That puts the upper threshold at 486 and 5x86 machines, because those CPUs can't run Windows XP.

  2. #12

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    And in April Microsoft is going to stop supporting XT.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by EvanK View Post
    Sigh...
    What's the problem? Not old enough?

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    To me, any computer that is too old to run a currently supported and popular operating system is vintage. That puts the upper threshold at 486 and 5x86 machines, because those CPUs can't run Windows XP.
    Amen.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mijk View Post
    What's the problem? Not old enough?
    To some folk that is case but who cares, if its what you want to do go for it. Personally I'd skip the 386 and go with a cheap 486 system maybe to start with. It was that processor along with Windows 3.x that really bought 32 bit computers to the majority of the so called "unwashed masses." Later boosted by the MS "Start Me Up!" side show Most of the later ones were quite capable of having 64megs of ram so a good selection of OSs to choose from. If you're lucky to find one, you can have a mobo with vlb/isa/pci

    Of course you can avoid x86 altogether.
    Last edited by Caluser2000; August 23rd, 2013 at 06:32 PM.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  6. #16

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    60's, 70's, mid 80's is considered "classic vintage computers" era and what this board was originally launched to discuss.

    Over time Amiga, Mac, IBM PS/2, VAX, 386, 486, Windows 3.1 systems, OS/2, and now Pentium have been added. Extra forum categories have been added. Brings new life to the board, right?

    As I have said many times the term vintage pertains to an era. It's just as legitimate to say "vintage 70's S-100" as it is to say "vintage Windows 3.1 gaming system for Doom" .....

    So I say if you think a partuicular era or class of computers is not "vintage" enough for you, stay out of that particular forum. The younger members gravitate to the newer vintage forums keeping this board fresh and relevant IMHO.


    My oldest working computer ... Heathkit ec-1


    One of the newest, on-topic for this forum anyway..OS/2 v 1 file mgr.

    I love them all!

    P.S. my day job is as a vmware / cloud computing technical sales consultant mgr. Newest of the new today, vintage "cloud computing era" tomorrow. I usually post here using an iPad or Vista machine I built from the Maximum PC magazine's 2008 "Dream Machine" specs.
    Last edited by billdeg; August 25th, 2013 at 05:46 AM.
    @ BillDeg:
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by billdeg View Post
    60's, 70's, mid 80's is considered "classic vintage computers" era and what this board was originally launched to discuss.

    Over time Amiga, Mac, IBM PS/2, VAX, 386, 486, Windows 3.1 systems, OS/2, and now Pentium have been added. Extra forum categories have been added. Brings new life to the board, right?
    It does. Also I'd imagine helps encourage those with the newer stuff have a peek at the other forums and maybe they'll get into something older, generating new discussions for those types.

    All in all vcf is a good place to hang out. You never know what might be learnt along the way.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

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