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Thread: OEM 11/73 Issues

  1. #11

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    Phew!

    Thank you.

    Until gslick gets back... I would pull everything but the CPU, 4-SLU Sigma, the QUAD Memory and the card in slot 9. Then work on getting TT0: (console SLU) to show a MicroODT prompt.

    Once that works, then add back cards to a "Working configuration".

    You'll have three simultaneous things to sort out...

    • which port on the 4SLU card is set as TT0: 177560
    • resolving the RS232 cable to you're connecting DTE to DTE (usually needs a null modem cable)
    • Baud rate and word format


    It will be all downhill from there.

    Short?

  2. #12
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    You have some useful boards there if they are good working boards.

    M3106 - DZQ11 - Q-Bus 4-line async MUX. Cannot be used as a console. Really only useful if you're running RSTS/E or 2.11BSD, or VMS and you want multiple terminal connections.
    M7504 - DEQNA - Q-Bus Ethernet.
    M7546 - TQK50 - Q-Bus TK50 tape controller.
    M7555 - RQDX3 - Q-Bus MFM floppy / hard drive controller.
    M7606 - KA630 - Q-Bus MicroVAX II CPU. MUST GO IN A Q22/CD SLOT (BA23 / BA123)
    M7609 - MS630 - Q-Bus 8MB for KA630 CPU. MUST GO IN A Q22/CD SLOT (BA23 / BA123)
    M7941 - DRV11 - Q-Bus 16-bit parallel line unit. No idea what you use this for.
    M8029 - RXV21 - Q-Bus RX02 floppy controller.
    M8047 - MXV11 - Q-Bus Multifunction RAM, 2 SLU, ROM sockets. -AA (4Kw) or -AC (16Kw) version?
    M9058 - Distribution board for M7555.

    The first thing you need to do is to sort out the minimal CPU, memory, console configuration.

    If it was me, after that I might try adding in the M7555 RQDX3 and the M9058 cabled up to an RX33 equivalent 5.25-inch floppy (e.g. TEAC FD-55GFR) and get XXDP diagnostics booting and running off of the floppy.

    For the absolute bare minimum you could try just the CPU and one of the M8047 MXV11-A cards, although there are enough fiddly jumpers on those that might not be the best bet unless you can't get one of the other async cards sorted out as the console.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by RSX11M+ View Post
    I would pull everything but the CPU, 4-SLU Sigma, the QUAD Memory and the card in slot 9. Then work on getting TT0: (console SLU) to show a MicroODT prompt.
    I got it! I put the Sigma card back in. I figured the MDB SLU card was the console TTY, but it is in fact the Sigma. I've got it connected to my USB/RS-232 converter. The baud rate is now set to a more usable 19.2k baud from 300 baud.

    ODT works just fine, but I still can't get it to do anything with the Emulex card. It just loops over and over, lighting up the three lights on the board in the same pattern. I'd at least expect it to spell something out to the console if it were trying to boot. Maybe I need to look at connecting the rest of the peripherals.

    I'll investigate next which board has the dead short to ground on the 12V rail and look at replacing the likely faulty tantalum cap.

  4. #14
    Join Date
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    Hi All;
    AntiqueKid3, "" I'll investigate next which board has the dead short to ground on the 12V rail and look at replacing the likely faulty tantalum cap. ""
    It will probably take You longer to find the Cap than finding the Faulty Board..
    Just take a Meter between the Ground Finger and the +12 finger on each Board, and it should Show up pretty quickly..
    But, Lifting one end of each Cap and re-putting it back in, will take longer..
    THANK YOU Marty

  5. #15
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    You could try manually issuing the bootstrap command to the QD32 using ODT and see if it can load a boot block from the drive.

    In section 6.6 BOOTSTRAP COMMAND of the QD32 manual it lists a sequence of steps to load a boot block from the drive and then execute that block.

    Steps 1-5 load the block, then steps 6-10 execute that block. You could use ODT to example memory starting at address 0, then manually follow steps 1-5, then example memory starting at address 0 again to see if it has been changed and if it looks anything like it might be a boot block from the drive. If that doesn't seem to work as expected it won't really give you much more information, but I don't know what else to try with that controller and drive for now.

    It those steps IP would be 17772150 and SA would be 17772152 for your controller configured as the first MSCP controller. (See Table 6-1 QD32 IP and SA Registers in the manual).

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by gslick View Post
    You could try manually issuing the bootstrap command to the QD32 using ODT and see if it can load a boot block from the drive.

    In section 6.6 BOOTSTRAP COMMAND of the QD32 manual it lists a sequence of steps to load a boot block from the drive and then execute that block.

    Steps 1-5 load the block, then steps 6-10 execute that block. You could use ODT to example memory starting at address 0, then manually follow steps 1-5, then example memory starting at address 0 again to see if it has been changed and if it looks anything like it might be a boot block from the drive. If that doesn't seem to work as expected it won't really give you much more information, but I don't know what else to try with that controller and drive for now.

    It those steps IP would be 17772150 and SA would be 17772152 for your controller configured as the first MSCP controller. (See Table 6-1 QD32 IP and SA Registers in the manual).
    The manual says to update the PSW with 340, but then it says 304. Any idea which is the correct value? Otherwise, everything is going swimmingly well so far. Thanks for the help, too.

  7. #17

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    Seems to be 340, not 304. It does the same thing, unfortunately, issuing the bootstrap sequence as it does when it's jumpered for auto-boot. It does successfully transfer data to address 0 and beyond.
    Code:
    00000000/000240      
    00000002/000406
    00000004/000000
    00000006/016522
    00000010/005007
    00000012/005007
    00000014/005007
    00000016/005007
    00000020/112737
    00000022/000340
    00000024/177776
    00000026/012704
    00000030/001000
    00000032/005002
    00000034/012703
    00000036/000400
    00000040/012224
    00000042/005303
    00000044/001375
    00000046/012706
    00000050/002000
    00000052/012707
    00000054/001056
    00000056/013767
    00000060/000004
    00000062/000014
    00000064/013767
    00000066/000006
    00000070/000010
    00000072/012705
    00000074/172150
    00000076/000413
    00000100/000000
    00000102/000000
    00000104/100000
    00000106/000744
    00000110/000000
    00000112/000001
    00000114/000744
    00000116/000011
    00000120/000744
    00000122/001041
    00000124/000000
    00000126/012702
    00000130/004000
    00000132/010225
    00000134/010703
    00000136/062703
    00000140/177746
    00000142/010304
    00000144/005715
    00000146/100463
    00000150/031502
    00000152/001774
    00000154/012315
    00000156/006302
    00000160/100371
    00000162/012301
    00000164/001456
    00000166/010102
    00000170/005041
    00000172/005701
    00000174/001375
    00000176/010201
    00000200/012761
    00000202/000060
    00000204/177624
    00000206/012761
    00000210/000001
    00000212/177626
    00000214/012761
    00000216/000001
    00000220/177630
    00000222/110061
    00000224/177634
    00000226/112361
    00000230/177640
    00000232/112361
    00000234/177645
    00000236/005713
    00000240/001006
    00000242/016761
    00000244/177634
    00000246/177664
    00000250/016761
    00000252/177624
    00000254/177666
    00000256/012722
    00000260/000660
    00000262/011422
    00000264/012722
    00000266/000574
    00000270/011412
    00000272/005765
    00000274/177776
    00000276/005715
    00000300/001006
    00000302/005762
    00000304/177774
    00000306/100773
    00000310/105761
    00000312/177726
    00000314/001722
    00000316/005045
    00000320/000702
    00000322/005045
    00000324/010004
    00000326/005007
    00000330/005007
    00000332/005007
    00000334/005007
    00000336/005007
    00000340/005007
    00000342/005007
    00000344/005007
    00000346/005007
    00000350/005007
    00000352/005007
    00000354/005007
    00000356/005007
    00000360/005007
    00000362/005007
    00000364/005007
    00000366/005007
    00000370/005007
    00000372/005007
    00000374/005007
    00000376/005007
    00000400/005007
    00000402/005007
    00000404/005007
    00000406/005007
    00000410/005007
    00000412/005007
    00000414/005007
    00000416/005007
    00000420/005007
    00000422/005007
    00000424/005007
    00000426/005007
    00000430/005007
    00000432/005007
    00000434/005007
    00000436/005007
    00000440/005007
    00000442/005007
    00000444/005007
    00000446/005007
    00000450/005007
    00000452/005007
    00000454/005007
    00000456/005007
    00000460/005007
    00000462/005007
    00000464/005007
    00000466/005007
    00000470/005007
    00000472/005007
    00000474/005007
    00000476/005007
    00000500/005007
    00000502/005007
    00000504/005007
    00000506/005007
    00000510/005007
    00000512/005007
    00000514/005007
    00000516/005007
    00000520/005007
    00000522/005007
    00000524/005007
    00000526/005007
    00000530/005007
    00000532/005007
    00000534/005007
    00000536/005007
    00000540/005007
    00000542/005007
    00000544/005007
    00000546/005007
    00000550/005007
    00000552/005007
    00000554/005007
    00000556/005007
    00000560/005007
    00000562/005007
    00000564/005007
    00000566/005007
    00000570/005007
    00000572/005007
    00000574/005007
    00000576/005007
    00000600/005007
    00000602/005007
    00000604/005007
    00000606/005007
    00000610/005007
    00000612/005007
    00000614/005007
    00000616/005007
    00000620/005007
    00000622/005007
    00000624/005007
    00000626/005007
    00000630/005007
    00000632/005007
    00000634/005007
    00000636/005007
    00000640/005007
    00000642/005007
    00000644/005007
    00000646/005007
    00000650/005007
    00000652/005007
    00000654/005007
    00000656/005007
    00000660/005007
    00000662/005007
    00000664/005007
    00000666/005007
    00000670/005007
    00000672/005007
    00000674/005007
    00000676/005007
    00000700/005007
    00000702/005007
    00000704/005007
    00000706/005007
    00000710/005007
    00000712/005007
    00000714/005007
    00000716/005007
    00000720/005007
    00000722/005007
    00000724/005007
    00000726/005007
    00000730/005007
    00000732/005007
    00000734/005007
    00000736/005007
    00000740/005007
    00000742/005007
    00000744/005007
    00000746/005007
    00000750/005007
    00000752/005007
    00000754/005007
    00000756/005007
    00000760/005007
    00000762/005007
    00000764/005007
    00000766/005007
    00000770/005007
    00000772/005007
    00000774/005007
    00000776/005007
    It's a good start, anyways. Looks like I should start disassembling the boot sector!
    Last edited by antiquekid3; February 19th, 2014 at 07:17 PM. Reason: Mixed up 304/340

  8. #18
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    Did you actually see the memory starting a location zero get written to by something that looks like it might be a boot block before you got as far as initializing the PSW?

    A PSW of 340 octal would be the usual value there. Priority Level set to 7 and all condition codes clear.

    The PSW bits are described in section 1.3.1 Processor Status Word (Address: 177 777 776) in the KDJ11-A_UsersManual.pdf if you're not already familiar with that.

  9. #19

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    Yes, I zeroed out a good portion of the first page starting at 0, then watched as they all magically updated. The dump pasted above is prior to executing it.

  10. #20
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    Oh, OK so you're getting some progress if the QD32 is actually able to read a boot block from the drive into system memory. That is a good start. Unless someone else has better ideas now I might start by disassembling it and then maybe stepping through it and see what happens when it is executing. Maybe it manages to load additional blocks from the drive and then jumps to that, but then whatever OS it is trying to load is having problems.

    I've never used PDP11GUI with real hardware. Maybe you could get setup to use that and see if you can dump and upload more of the disk to a PC for further analysis of what is currently on the disk.

    http://retrocmp.com/tools/pdp11gui/d...ages-readwrite

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