Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 19 of 19

Thread: Making a new belt for a Compaq LTE floppy drive

  1. #11

    Default

    I'm sorry about the laptop. I hope that its something simple.

    To answer my other questions, is there a possibility of having you build some new stock? I don't have the tools for it and making them by hand is proving to be difficult.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    423
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    I can't find the cassette spool seen in the above photos, but realised I'd saved some of the cut tape and stashed it in the LTE ring binder front pocket. There's a good few metres of it so shouldn't be any problem. I can make up a few belts at 225mm and send them along with a length so you can make your own if they don't fit. Send me a pm and give me some time to make them up. You will need to make the wire hook and find some blue-tack, I could not have got the belt on without those.

    Steve.

  3. #13

    Default

    I'm not able to PM you for some reason. The more you can send the merrier as I now have 7 drives with stretched/broken belts or a blob of rubber.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    423
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    80486sx, I'd say you can't PM me until your post count goes up. Anyway, as requested I've made some belts for you.

    Here's some more details on how I make them, in case anyone wants to have a try as there are other drives out there that could benefit from small belts such as these. It's not too difficult but patience and good light helps, also a new(ish) tube of superglue.
    The most difficult thing is to produce the correct width belt material in the first place, but I think for short length ones as these, a pair of scissors would be adequate to cut them to width along the 200+mm length. Sure, one side might be a little wavy or tapered but that probably wouldn't matter.

    Step 1. Cutting the tape to length. Making sure the starting end is clipped neatly, lay out the tape material along a ruler and cut to the required belt circumference plus 5mm for the overlap. You can use sharp scissors for this, as its really not critical, just clip a little at a time. Tools I use here are the sharp scissors, #11 and also curved Exactos, and a jeweller's 3x loupe to inspect the results:


    Step 2. Scrape the oxide off. First, determining the oxide side is usually easy - look at the tape surface on bothe sides, they will both be shiny but the oxide will be shinier. Using a curved Exacto blade, GENTLY scrape the tape from 5 or 8mm back from the edge to the end. Thirty or so very light scrapes will do it. The curved blade is important as a flat #11 blade does not scrape properly.
    If you scrape too hard the tape stretches or tears so once again LIGHTLY is the go. Also do a very short scrape on the underside of the other end (which has no oxide) so that the surfaces to be bonded are both keyed as much as possible.


    Finished result:


    Some belts cut to length, scraped and ready for joining. A few of these later failed when tension-tested:


    Step 3. Preparation for bonding. On a flat metal surface that you can wrap the belt under, use a strip of fridge magnet (flexible, not very strong stuff used for advertising) to hold the oxide-surface-up end down. I used the handle of a small engineers square as it was short enough to have the belt easily reach around each end. A strip of paper keeps the belt from adhering to the steel, or you can also put a layer of stickytape on the steel surface beforehand to do the same.


    Step 4. Bring the other end of the tape (oxide to the top, polyester base down) around under the steel surface and put on the table to hold it flat as you don't want to make a Mobius strip here.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    423
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    (continued)
    Step 5. Using another strip of the flexible fridge magnet, clamp down the other end. You can then slide it around to get the overlap to 5mm and also set it straight.
    Step 6. Once aligned, carefully lift the top end with tweezers or the knife blade to drop a tiny bit of superglue on the scraped surface, then drop:


    The excess glue can be soaked up with a cotton bud which can also be used to apply pressure whilst setting. Pressure must be put on the join or it will not bond properly:


    Step 7. Once dry, the belt can be lifted off the metal clamping surface and checked. Leave them for a while then aply some light tension to check if the bond was successful. If not - make another one. If there is a slight misalignment then sharp scissors can be used to cut the skewed bits off the join:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    423
    Blog Entries
    9

    Default

    And for completeness sake, here is an alternative to gluing: I've found that the polyester videotape material takes well to welding.
    Step 1. Set the soldering iron set to under half temp:


    Step 2. Set up belt ends as per gluing, but do not use paper or stickytape underneath - just the bare metal. It heatsinks the tape very nicely:


    Step 3. Using the tip of the iron, quickly tap the overlap with the tip of the iron about 10 or 15 times as a speckle of small dots. Do not hold the iron on too long or it distorts the belt:


    Final result. Here are seven 220mm circumference belts. Three of these are glued and the remaining four are welded, ready for testing by 80486sx:
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Toronto ON Canada
    Posts
    7,137

    Default

    Brilliant! I'll have to try this; finally a use for those fridge magnets

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    7,492
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Did those belts work out? I need one for my Compaq.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Did those belts work out? I need one for my Compaq.
    https://www.ebay.com/itm/FLAT-SECTIO...gAAOSwzHRbIbJJ

    If you have an LTE (8086), LTE 286 or LTE 386s/20, this belt will work. If you have a newer model (Lite series and up), it won’t.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •