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Thread: New Life for Old Notebook

  1. #1

    Default New Life for Old Notebook

    Well, I guess I got tired of playing around in MS-DOS on my old Dell Latitude XPi 133 notebook. I downloaded the OpenBSD 3.9 boot floppy image (for notebooks), transferred it to a floppy disk and installed OpenBSD 3.9 over the network using my old Linksys 802.11b wireless PCMCIA card. It worked like a champ, and I'm currently sitting at the login prompt.

    Note: The OpenBSD on-line installation manual is excellent, if anyone else wants to follow in my footsteps.

    This notebook does not have a CD-ROM drive installed, which makes it much more difficult to install software. Having the network work well is a major plus. Also, this notebook only has 32 MB of RAM, and a 1.3 GB hard drive, so I opted to skip the installation of X. I'm very comfortable at the Unix console, so this will work for me. YMMV.
    Remember, no matter where you go... there you are!

  2. #2

    Default

    I'm a huge OpenBSD fan. Unlike most contemporary Linux distros,
    with OpenBSD it's possible to load a minimal operating system,
    and just add what you need via binary packages:

    Code:
    # pkg_add http://archive-site/3.9/packages/packagename.tgz

    "It's a me-too, 8-bit machine with good graphics and a disk system nobody will support."
    -- Bill Gates, about the Sony SMC-70 with the new 3.5" floppy drives (InfoWorld; June 7, 1982)

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ahm View Post
    I'm a huge OpenBSD fan. Unlike most contemporary Linux distros,
    with OpenBSD it's possible to load a minimal operating system,
    and just add what you need via binary packages:

    Code:
    # pkg_add http://archive-site/3.9/packages/packagename.tgz
    Yeah, I know. I've been using OpenBSD for several years now.

    It really works great on a low-end system.

    Hey ahm, I forgot to add this:

    I exported the "PKG_PATH" variable in my .profile script. I set it to:

    'ftp://ftp.openbsd.org/pub/OpenBSD/3.9/packages/i386/'

    And now all I need to do (while connected to the internet) is type in:

    pkg_add package_name.tgz

    And it will find the package and install it for me.
    Last edited by DoctorPepper; September 29th, 2006 at 02:09 AM. Reason: Added PKG_PATH stuff
    Remember, no matter where you go... there you are!

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