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Thread: Toshiba T3200SXC needs new LCD scree, need help finding compatible replacement.

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  1. #1
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    Default Toshiba T3200SXC needs new LCD scree, need help finding compatible replacement.

    Hi everyone!

    I've got a Toshiba T3200SXC portable, the screen comes on rather crisp for a few minutes at boot, but quickly fades to nearly illegible washed out colorless pale grey. I'm wondering if anyone can help me find a suitable replacement screen. Here's what I know about it from the manual and from taking it apart:

    Toshiba P/N VF0060P01
    Sharp P/N LQ10D013

    10.4 inch screen, 640 x 480 pixels, TFT Colour LCD (VGA), 512 color capability
    Maximum of 185193 colors (256 colors at one time)
    VGA compatible Graphics Adapter WD90C21

    The motherboard connects to the LCD with a 28 pin I/F connector, 27 of the pins are in use. Attached is the pin assignment table:

    LCD-Pins.jpg

    If anyone knows how to use this information to find a suitable replacement, I'd be most thankful. There's currently an LQ10D013 on Ebay for $1490.00! I have no idea why so expensive. http://www.ebay.com/itm/new-LCD-Scre...item2344bc5037

    Jonathan

  2. #2
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    This is a common problem with these machines. Seen the same thing on the T6600 & T6400. It's down to failing capacitors on the inverter board.

    Cheers,
    Dave

  3. #3
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    [QUOTE=Moonferret;351182]This is a common problem with these machines. Seen the same thing on the T6600 & T6400. It's down to failing capacitors on the inverter board.

    That's good information, are you suggesting that my current screen could be repaired with a few capacitors?

  4. #4
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    I've been researching this on my own, but not sure if I understand correctly. The pin out on the manual lists the following signals:
    R0, R1, R2, G0, G1, G2, B0, B1, B2

    To me this would suggest a 9 bit RGB signal, 3 bits for each R, G, B
    perhaps over a TTL interface?

    The most basic modern 10.4" screens I can get a datasheet for seem to require 18 bit TTL, 6 bits per color.

    Anyone out there familiar enough with LCD interfaces to confirm if I'm on the right track?

    Sometimes it's just about knowing enough of the right vocabulary to ask Google the right question.

  5. #5
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    Somebody else with the same problem...

    http://www.vintage-radio.net/forum/s...ad.php?t=42242

    1st thing to check would be the capacitors on the inverter board. If it's anything like the T6400, it will be these that are causing the issues with the contrast. Sadly, I can't be any more specific as I done the repair on a T6400 nearly 10 years ago and no longer have the machine to check

    Cheers,
    Dave

  6. #6
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    I was able to install a new screen into the T3200SXC. One nice thing about this model is that there's gobs of room inside the case. It also has a VGA out on the motherboard. My solution was to remove the motherboard, flip it over and solder wire leads onto the through-hole pins of the VGA connector. Then I routed the wires up through the inside of the case. I ordered a new LED backlit 10.4 screen with VGA input and shoehorned it into the original brackets of the failed screen. A bonus to this modification is that the original LCD only supported 640x480, and my new screen now supports 800x600, which the VGA out also supports. The end result is fantastic, everything looks and works like the machine has been unmodified.
    IMG_0591.jpgIMG_0593.jpgIMG_0594.jpg


    The next challenge is to see if I can get the XTIDE BIOS installed and working on this machine.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by new_castle_j View Post
    I've been researching this on my own, but not sure if I understand correctly. The pin out on the manual lists the following signals:
    R0, R1, R2, G0, G1, G2, B0, B1, B2

    To me this would suggest a 9 bit RGB signal, 3 bits for each R, G, B
    perhaps over a TTL interface?

    The most basic modern 10.4" screens I can get a datasheet for seem to require 18 bit TTL, 6 bits per color..

    It's an old thread, but I just managed to install a new 10.4 inch 640x480 TFT screen into that machine. I 3D printed some mounting adapters, because the new screen had smaller case, and I also had to do solder some wires. The new screen was regular 486/Pentium 1 laptop-style 18 bit, 6bit per color, similar screens are also used in industrial machines. But I found out that this isn't a problem, because you can easily convert that to 9bit. Just connect R0 with R1, R2 with R3, R4 with R6 etc... and it requires no logic chips or anything else at all. The only function of these R G B lines is setting the brightness of each pixel. I etched some small adapter PCB at home because the new screen had 0.5mm ribbon connector with 32 pins and I couldn't solder wires to the pins. So I soldered the ribbon to the adapter, soldered the 2mm pitch connector and I had to solder some additional wires manually, from the pads visible on PCB to appropriate pins (service manual is needed to do that).

    So, if anyone else has T3200 with broken screen, it's possible to fix and you can use more modern TFT panels

    lcd1.jpg
    You can see white 3D printed parts

    working2.jpg
    Previous owner has left German DOS on the disk

    adapter22.jpg
    (that's probably not professionally designed PCB... and it should be front layer, not bottom - it shouldn't be mirrored)

  8. #8

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    Update (i can no longer edit my post):

    If you will connect everything the way I did it will work, but it will look okay only in 16-color VGA mode. I noticed that such connection is incorrect, because it raises the contrast by high amount, when 256 colors are displayed - darker colors are darker than they should be, and bright are brighter. Only basic colors some mixes of them are okay.

    The explanation is simple, just look at this:

    When you wire R0 with R0 and R1, R1 with R2 and R3 and R2 with R4 and R5 (laptop connector bold), you will get following values for 8 possible shades of red color (decimal and binary):

    00 000000
    03 000011
    12 001100
    15 001111
    48 110000
    51 110011
    60 111100
    63 111111


    Colors aren't linear now, it is clear when you look at decimal values. The curve would look like this:
    curve11.jpg

    If you want to use 3-bit LCD controller with 6 bit LCD screen, you have to wire it the following way:

    R0 with R3, R1 with R4, R2 with R5. That's only 3 wires for a color channel, other wires remain unconnected.

    Colors are linear now:

    00 000000
    08 001000
    16 010000
    24 011000
    32 100000
    40 101000
    48 110000
    56 111000

    curve10.jpg

    The only downside is that the screen is about 11% darker (because max. value should be 63) - but this isn't noticeable at all.

    I hope that this post will be helpful for anyone trying to fix the screen in old laptops. It is very hard (or expensive) to find a matching screen for such old hardware and it will be often necessary just to use what you can find and adapt it.

    By the way, you can probably put TFT screen in place of DSTN screen and vice-versa - I tried swapping screens of my Siemens-Nixdorf PCD-4ND laptops (it was easy to do because they are being held just by 3 screws and there are no cables, just built-in connectors) - and different types of screens worked in different laptops.
    Last edited by wjpl; February 28th, 2016 at 01:06 PM.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by wjpl View Post
    It's an old thread, but I just managed to install a new 10.4 inch 640x480 TFT screen into that machine. I 3D printed some mounting adapters, because the new screen had smaller case, and I also had to do solder some wires. The new screen was regular 486/Pentium 1 laptop-style 18 bit, 6bit per color, similar screens are also used in industrial machines. But I found out that this isn't a problem, because you can easily convert that to 9bit. Just connect R0 with R1, R2 with R3, R4 with R6 etc... and it requires no logic chips or anything else at all. The only function of these R G B lines is setting the brightness of each pixel. I etched some small adapter PCB at home because the new screen had 0.5mm ribbon connector with 32 pins and I couldn't solder wires to the pins. So I soldered the ribbon to the adapter, soldered the 2mm pitch connector and I had to solder some additional wires manually, from the pads visible on PCB to appropriate pins (service manual is needed to do that).

    So, if anyone else has T3200 with broken screen, it's possible to fix and you can use more modern TFT panels

    lcd1.jpg
    You can see white 3D printed parts

    working2.jpg
    Previous owner has left German DOS on the disk

    adapter22.jpg
    (that's probably not professionally designed PCB... and it should be front layer, not bottom - it shouldn't be mirrored)
    Hi,
    I have the same problem. I have a perfect T3200sxc with a defective lcd panel Sharp LQ10D013
    But i can't find any compatible 10.4 inch tft lcd screen in the netherlands.
    I'm not really into lcd technology so i wonder how do i connect all these data lines to a modern 18 bit LCD ?

    Screenshot_2017-06-19-20-24-01.jpg

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