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Thread: Math Coprocessor and Heatsink Question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Ontario, Canada... the frosty north.
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    Default Math Coprocessor and Heatsink Question

    After long and patient waiting, I have secured an original Intel 80287-3 math coprocessor for my '86 IBM PC AT, but I am unfamilliar with such chips. Knowing CPU's back then, just as now, they can run quite hot... but would it be wise to glue a heatsink atop of the coprocessor?

    I've heard they run quite hotter than compared to the 80286 processor itself, is this true? If it is, would gluing a heatsink to it be a wise descision, albeit it not entirely historical?

  2. #2

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    I don't remember ever seeing a heatsink on a 287 before although I do remember some heat conducting material being used between the chip and socket on some installations.

    It may run a bit hotter, but I don't think you'll need a heatsink. You can, of course, use one if it makes you feel better!

    Erik

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Ontario, Canada... the frosty north.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik
    I don't remember ever seeing a heatsink on a 287 before although I do remember some heat conducting material being used between the chip and socket on some installations.
    Heat insulating or heat conducting material? Just wanting to make sure as I'd think heat conducting material would want to be avoided in such an application, hehe. If so, what type of material was it, specifically?

    Quote Originally Posted by Erik
    It may run a bit hotter, but I don't think you'll need a heatsink. You can, of course, use one if it makes you feel better!
    I've seen a few pics of the AT's (and other IBM PC's) with the coprocessor installed and no heatsink on it, but I've read instances where they would be better.

    I'll do some research, but if I can't find any evidence saying otherwise, I'm going to see if I can find a heatsink small enough to attach to it anyways. Better safe than sorry...

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Super-Slasher
    Heat insulating or heat conducting material? Just wanting to make sure as I'd think heat conducting material would want to be avoided in such an application, hehe. If so, what type of material was it, specifically?
    D'oh!

    I meant insulating. I'm pretty sure it was designed to keep the heat off of the socket/motherboard.

    It was basically a thin plastic film with some metallic content. If I remember they were kind of orange.

    Erik

  5. #5

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    Mine (in the 5170) is even covered with some cardboard like wrapper.
    No heatsink thus.

    I'll recently got a digital camera- when I have time I'm gonna take some pictures of the 5170, including interior and ISA cards.

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