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Thread: What's the max than an IBM XT case can take - IBM XTeroids upgrade?

  1. #11

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    The Idea is not to modify the case in any way, leaving its internal structure as AS-IS and find the most powerful board to fit in. The ATX ones might be a good choice. The Keyboard connector in this boards (link below) is AT style and by some of the pictures that I have seen it seems that would line up with the keyboard hole in the case. I am adding a link to one that I have been checking out (Though I have no idea if this is the best I could find)
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/GENERIC-ACHI...oAAOSwsB9WAQrJ
    Seems that the 16BIT ISA slots would allign well with the case.... not sure about the PCI ones. I heard in the past that the ASUS P5A-B was a real close fit (if not a perfect fit) for the case but I do not seem to find these out in the market,...
    My other constrain is that I am limited by the 130WATTS PSU, I can make it up to 200WATTS with another suitable CPU that fits into the XT case, but that is about it. Though other option could be to hook it up to an external PSU.. (Hmmm....why not)

    This could be a fun project, I am not giving any use to this case now, hence willing to try new things, thought in the future I might want to restore it to its original contents and that is why I am not looking to modify (damage) the case at all.

  2. #12
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    I think an external PSU might be the easiest way, because fitting an XT or even an AT-PSU to a modern ATX board will be very difficult. ATX power supplies are soft-switched by the motherboard, rather than having a power button that switches the mains on/off.
    Then there's hibernate/sleep modes etc.

  3. #13

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    I did see an 'ATX motherboard in XT case' project online some years ago, which gutted the original PSU, replaced its innards with the works of an ATX PSU, and hooked the ATX power button up to the Big Red Switch. So to get the same effect as pressing an ATX power button, the user would have to turn the Big Red Switch on and off.

    I won't get on to what was done to the rest of the case to get an ATX motherboard and optical drive in there...

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaCiRo View Post
    The ATX ones might be a good choice. The Keyboard connector in this boards (link below) is AT style and by some of the pictures that I have seen it seems that would line up with the keyboard hole in the case. I am adding a link to one that I have been checking out (Though I have no idea if this is the best I could find)
    So, I've run into a few boards like that before. Form-factor-wise they were technically Baby AT boards, but they included an ATX power supply connector (and soft-power-ability) and came with a pretty ridiculous looking ATX I/O plate that accommodated the AT keyboard connector. (And also let you screw the pigtails for the onboard SuperI/O ports into it instead of consuming slots with them. This let them go into either kind of case and work with either sort of power supply so they were sort of handy. Something like this is exactly the sort of thing you might want to try fitting into your XT case; as I said, the wild card is if it'll go in without something like the RAM slots or CPU socket physically interfering with the drive bracket.

    My other constrain is that I am limited by the 130WATTS PSU, I can make it up to 200WATTS with another suitable CPU that fits into the XT case, but that is about it. Though other option could be to hook it up to an external PSU.. (Hmmm....why not)
    In my experience it's sort of a crapshoot whether a given Baby AT board will work with an XT power supply. I swear I vaguely recall that there's some subtle difference between XT and AT power supplies (something to do with the power good signal or something, I honestly don't remember?) and I remember encountering a couple AT boards that just weren't happy with with XT supplies for some reason. BUT, that said, I think the majority of them worked, and 130 watts should be good enough to drive a Super Socket 7-era board and a hard disk, as long as you don't go super crazy with the video card.

    For the most powerful hybrid I made (An AMD K6) I gutted a dead 63 watt PC power supply and replaced the innards from one of those dirt-common MiniTower AT power supplies. Not suggesting you do that but it was a relatively easy way to get a 250 watt AT-compatible XT supply.

    This could be a fun project, I am not giving any use to this case now, hence willing to try new things, thought in the future I might want to restore it to its original contents and that is why I am not looking to modify (damage) the case at all.
    If you have a ready source of old Pentium-era junk to paw through I'd totally say go for it. Again, the biggest problem you're going to run into is the placement and low altitude of the middle drive bay. It sits so close to the motherboard that if there's anything like a SIMM socket in that area of the board it's a deal-breaker. (I'd almost suggest what you should do is make a cardboard template the same size as the original motherboard, slip it into place, and outline the drive bay "shadow" onto it. That might give you an idea at least when you're looking at a given board if it's likely to interfere or not.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
    I swear I vaguely recall that there's some subtle difference between XT and AT power supplies (something to do with the power good signal or something, I honestly don't remember?) and I remember encountering a couple AT boards that just weren't happy with with XT supplies for some reason.
    See the earlier thread at [here].

  6. #16

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    Thanks! The cardboard motherboard model is a great idea actually!. I will take measures from the spec docs of several of this and see if I can can reproduce a reliable cardboard model. This actually will help me too in confirming if the Motherboard holes and I/O ports line up with the case nicely.
    The Power is still an issue if I keep it as an internal PSU.... I think about an external solution might be the best.

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