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Thread: ASUS A7N8X-E Deluxe

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasma View Post
    Also, both my boards developed bad caps...you may want to check yours if you haven't replaced them yet.
    ASUS motherboards from the late 90s all the way up to 2009 use garbage capacitors. I've repaired dozens of ASUS boards with blown caps, most of which had Asia-X brand (Teapo (Cheapo), OST, Fuhjyyu, fake Nichicon, fake Rubycon, UCC KZG series, etc.) What makes them annoying to repair is that they like to put the solder mask on backwards or the component key on backwards, often times interchangeably on the same board. This makes you have to first go through and mark the polarity of each cap with a marker before you start replacing caps.

  2. #12

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    ASUS motherboards from the late 90s all the way up to 2009 use garbage capacitors ... fake Nichicon, fake Rubycon
    A brand like Asus using fake capacitors? This seems extremely unlikely. You were almost certainly dealing with counterfeit Asus motherboards if you encounted any non-authentic components onboard. This has been an occasional problem for Asus due to their reputation of being a manufacturer of high quality products.

  4. #14
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    Thanks to Plasma my SATA/RAID driver problem was easily solved. The box is up and running with XP on a logical partition. I have an 8X AGP on the way, as well as a new Sempron 'Barton' chip and three 1 GB sticks of PC-3200 RAM. I attempted to install a Kingston 120 SSD as the primary drive and that failed. The system BIOS and DOS would see the SSD as the primary boot device okay, however, XP would only see it as the secondary drive. While attempting to install XP with the SSD as the primary drive, the XP install procedure would halt with a "HD not found" message. The SATA/RAID drivers loaded without an issue, but the XP install routine refuses to see the SSD during the install phase. I spent way too much time trying to solve that issue. As an afterthought. it may be a blessing in disguise, in that the A7N8X-E is a non-ACHI motherboard and there is a possibility of TRIM issues down the line. I plan to further isolate the problem by attempting to use a SATA HD and see if it's just a Kingston SSD issue. In my experience, there have always been a few 'gotchas' when trying to retrofit new technology to older systems.

  5. #15

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    Interesting. A7N8X Deluxe could do IDE or AHCI mode but I always used IDE mode with SATA because it just made things easier with utilities like boot managers and partition editors. Never tried an SSD with it though.

    Quote Originally Posted by cthulhu View Post
    A brand like Asus using fake capacitors? This seems extremely unlikely. You were almost certainly dealing with counterfeit Asus motherboards if you encounted any non-authentic components onboard. This has been an occasional problem for Asus due to their reputation of being a manufacturer of high quality products.
    Lol, I can tell you first hand they did. I ordered my ASUS boards directly from Newegg and they both had crap caps that eventually bulged, leaked, and caused rebooting. ASUS has always had the reputation of quality, but just like Antec PSUs, reputation does not always equal reality. At the end of the day they are still consumer products using low-cost components. Since the caps work fine initially and take several years to develop symptoms, it's quite likely that ASUS had no idea there was anything wrong with them and thought they were just getting a good deal on caps.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    I attempted to install a Kingston 120 SSD as the primary drive and that failed. The system BIOS and DOS would see the SSD as the primary boot device okay, however, XP would only see it as the secondary drive. While attempting to install XP with the SSD as the primary drive, the XP install procedure would halt with a "HD not found" message. The SATA/RAID drivers loaded without an issue, but the XP install routine refuses to see the SSD during the install phase. I spent way too much time trying to solve that issue. As an afterthought. it may be a blessing in disguise, in that the A7N8X-E is a non-ACHI motherboard and there is a possibility of TRIM issues down the line. I plan to further isolate the problem by attempting to use a SATA HD and see if it's just a Kingston SSD issue. In my experience, there have always been a few 'gotchas' when trying to retrofit new technology to older systems.
    While SATA is supposed to be backwards and forwards compatible, older SATA I controllers usually have problems with newer SATA II/ III drives. I have several motherboards from that vintage with SATA I controllers and they won't work properly with a newer drive unless I jumper the drive to SATA 150 mode. Most mechanical drives have this compatibility jumper next to the SATA connector, but I'm pretty sure that was removed on SSDs. Some SSDs have the option to downgrade their firmware to work in SATA 150 mode, but that's always a dicey process.

    Quote Originally Posted by cthulhu View Post
    A brand like Asus using fake capacitors? This seems extremely unlikely. You were almost certainly dealing with counterfeit Asus motherboards if you encounted any non-authentic components onboard. This has been an occasional problem for Asus due to their reputation of being a manufacturer of high quality products.
    Counterfeit ASUS motherboards? That's a good one. ASUS has never been a reputable company in my book, not only because of using junk capacitors for decades, but because they also cut corners in their designs that results in an unstable or non-working product. Then you have their awful customer no-support, which people have been complaining about for well over a decade. Even die hard ASUS fans over at Hardforum have started abandoning ASUS for these reasons.

    Quote Originally Posted by Plasma View Post
    Lol, I can tell you first hand they did. I ordered my ASUS boards directly from Newegg and they both had crap caps that eventually bulged, leaked, and caused rebooting. ASUS has always had the reputation of quality, but just like Antec PSUs, reputation does not always equal reality. At the end of the day they are still consumer products using low-cost components. Since the caps work fine initially and take several years to develop symptoms, it's quite likely that ASUS had no idea there was anything wrong with them and thought they were just getting a good deal on caps.
    ASUS has long used United Chemi-con capacitors from their KZG series on many of their motherboards. The KZG series has been well known for over a decade to be unreliable and fail but ASUS never bothered to address the problem and kept pumping out products using them. I took another look at some of their recent boards on Newegg and they still use garbage Taiwanese or generic Asia-X brand caps. Some of the caps don't even have names on them, let alone farad/voltage ratings.

    I did find the names of a few caps like Tk, which is a Japanese company that sells rebranded OST Taiwanese capacitors.
    Last edited by GiGaBiTe; December 9th, 2015 at 03:53 PM.

  7. #17

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    Just to add some ASUS-ain't-so-great evidence:

    My experience with ASUS includes dealing with a P5N-E SLI mainboard, and discovering:


    • The BIOS is half-assed and only supports a single 1.44" HD floppy; anything else or even two floppies, forget about it. No installing a 360K DSDD into that box and no using that box as a tweener.


    • With the wrong kind of USB hub attached, the PC won't boot.
      This is the fault of the mainboard and the USB hub, who are both doing something they're not supposed to do. Per spec, powered USB devices/hubs are not supposed to reverse-supply +5VDC to the mainboard (their own power is only supposed to be used downstream and for their own purposes, not upstream), but equally, if the mainboard does encounter something like that coming from some USB device, it's supposed to tolerate that. The ASUS P5N-E SLI doesn't tolerate that. The presence of (very common) low-quality powered USB hubs/devices (who do supply +5VDC upstream) actually prevents the mainboard from booting; the PC won't switch on in that case. This can be fixed by nannying the mainboard by inserting Schottky diodes into the +5VDC wire for all USB ports that low-quality powered USB devices might conceivably be attached to. You can make an "ASUS condom" USB dongle or you can modify the low-quality USB device outright and put a diode into it.


    But yeah, ASUS ain't so great. I've had my local small PC store guy sneer/snicker at the mention of ASUS, and now I understand why.

  8. #18
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    ASUS A7N8X-Deluxe update: The native mobo SATA ports did not play nice with the SSD or the SATA HD. So, I installed a PCI SATA/RAID adapter and was able to get the system to boot DOS on the SSD and the WD SATA HD. However, the adapter would have no part of the XP install routine, even after it properly installed the SI drivers via F6, and still insisting that it couldn't find a HD. The bottom line is that I'll continue to use the Samsung 160 MB HD (not the fastest in the land) and shelve the SSD thoughts for a while. There may be some wild drivers out there somewhere, but that search is going to have to wait a while. Maybe an IDE SD card would do, but I hate forking out for something just to prove a point to myself. But, on the other hand, it's never stopped me before. (being old you can kind of justify these things in your own mind)
    Last edited by Agent Orange; December 10th, 2015 at 11:33 AM.

  9. #19

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    Have you tried an IDE to SATA adapter? I use this adapter with a P4 board and Samsung 840 and 850 Pro SSDs. No F6 drivers needed.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plasma View Post
    Have you tried an IDE to SATA adapter? I use this adapter with a P4 board and Samsung 840 and 850 Pro SSDs. No F6 drivers needed.
    Haven't tried that approach. I have both, the 840 and 850 SSD's, but they're currently in use on my big gaming box. Maybe I'll give it a shot as it's probably cheaper than a SD card. Thanks for the tip.

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