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Thread: Newly manufactured 5.25" floppy disks

  1. #91
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    Wasn't Daisy the odd man out in early CAD workstations, in that they used the 286 architecture, as opposed to the 68K one that the competition was using? I never did understand that move.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Hartman View Post
    I have a file that you can print on a printer that you can use to make floppy disk sleeves with...

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/nktdd8wrbi...cover.pdf?dl=0
    Last time I downloaded one of these and printed, it printed out the wrong size (was off about a half inch). I probably needed to do some tweaking but never followed up on it. I'll give this one a try, Thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Get a pack of tyvek paper and you're all set.
    Haha, not for $15 for 20 sheets or $20 for 50 sheets... that might be more than i paid for my disks.
    Last edited by ngtwolf; September 17th, 2018 at 01:09 PM.
    -- Brian

    Retro PC's: Apple IIe/II+, Atari 800, Atari 520STFM, Commodore 64, Commodore Amiga 3000, Commodore SX-64, IBM PS/1 2121-B82, Tandy 1000 SX, TI-99/4A, TRS-80 Model 4 GA, Kaypro 2/84 (Not working )

  3. #93

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    Daisy was odd. Yes, it was 286 based. Daisy and Valid made their own hardware. Mentor was using Apollo. The Valid SCALD station was a real clunker. It was a 19" rack about 4 feet tall with a digitizing station next to it. They used a magnetic puck and cleverly hollowed out the underside of the table to put the tablet underneath. I think the cards were S100. The Daisy Logician was basically self contained, with the works under the monitor and a smaller digitizing table attached. The Apollo DN420 was a washtub. Their early keyboards had a touchpad attached that would "bubble" up with wear. Run the disk test on an Apollo, and it would literally go into "washing machine" mode rocking back and forth. Gotta love 14" disk drives. The company I was at paid Daisy $15K for one disk drive at one point. Argh! Apollo used 8" floppies, Daisy used the 5.25 floppies, and the Valid had a 1/2" tape drive in the rack.

  4. #94
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    I think I had a couple of Daisy monitors at one time. Mitsubishi 19" color, great heavy hulking things with a keylock tray below the screen. I drove it with a modified VGA card and my own sync adapter--I think they were SOG. Nice thing, but it caused my desk to develop a bow. in the middle. I suspect the thing weighed 70 lbs--and I had two of them. I got them from Haltek in Mountain View as surplus.

  5. #95

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Kossow View Post
    arrgh! I've been trying to find Daisy software for decades

    what do you still have?
    I found them! It looks I may have the entire V6.1 release of Daisy Systems tools for the 286 Logician from 1988. They're all still in unopened shrink wrap. I have Dnix Install, Design Entry Base, Digital Design Base, Digital Analysis Base, plus several add-ons for those. There are also some labeled EGA which may be support for EGA graphics. All told, there are almost 40 floppies. I do not know if they are readable on any other system. They have been in an attic for almost 30 years...

    Edit: it looks like the Daisy floppies I already reformatted were older, 1986, 1987. That V6.1 release may never have been installed, or it was a duplicate set.

    At work, I had tons of the 8" DSDD floppies Apollo used, but I never kept any, as they were not compatible with my OSI computer which used low density 8" floppies.
    Last edited by mediasponge; September 17th, 2018 at 11:17 PM.

  6. #96
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    IBM 360 Assembler was fun...

  7. #97
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    So was 1401 Autocoder.

    At any rate, I was doing some trash clearance and stumbled upon yet another pile of old customer 5.25" floppies. Flotsam and jetsam around here, it seems.

    These were interesting. Maxell MD-2s look fine; 3Ms also. Nashua showed lots of shedding; the two Athanas looked like they'd been pricked with a pin (i.e., see-through spots).

    In the same batch was a pile of 3.5 DSHD floppies, some of which were the Dysan brand. I hadn't realized that Dysan was still in business when the HD 3.5"s came out.

    FWIW, customer disks hit the degausser before the trash barrel. I used to shred them in a crosscut shredder, but degaussing is probably just as effective. Besides, who still has a 5.25" drive, much less one that reads Wang WP format?
    -----------------------------
    It has occurred to me that I've been at this too long (ca. 50 years). Not only do most post 1980s PCs seem the same to me, but I can no longer remember work that I've done as recently as 4 or 5 years ago. Probably time to hang up my #2 pencil...

    This was really driven home to me when I was reading about the AVX x86 facility and realized that I'd seen the same thing --in 1969.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); September 24th, 2018 at 11:06 PM.

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