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Thread: The Ebay Follies

  1. #21
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    Oh and then there was the $11,000 Buy it now Lisa mouse a few months back. Gee 11,000 for a mouse.
    *FrankG*

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chromedome45 View Post
    Oh and then there was the $11,000 Buy it now Lisa mouse a few months back. Gee 11,000 for a mouse.
    For that much, you could get someone to build you a new one from scratch! (Including a fake Steve Jobs autograph.)

  3. #23
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    Heh! One that surprised me was an Altair 8800 clone. Not the Grant Stockly one, but the other one with the entirely empty case. You could buy it for $620ish. He resold it for $999! He does the same thing with the Newton Apple I boards.. buys em, gets a Woz signature and then tries to flip for several hundred. And succeeds!

    Is he buying this stuff using his vintagecomputermuseum user? Or another? I've never been able to tag him to a purchase.

    Quote Originally Posted by MicrocomputerSolutions View Post
    There are Buyers that are willing to pay a elevated a to get what they want, Uneducated Buyers who don't know what the going rate is, and Flippers bent on sucking up lower priced items and dumping them back on the market.

    Vintagecomputermuseum seems to spend a lot of time, going everywhere on eBay and bidding on everything that is what I consider to be priced below market. He/she/they then turn around and relist the item for sale, breaking it into smaller pieces if the item was a whole (say a complete computer with software and documentation become just the computer, separate software packages, and separate packets of documentation). Each item selling for much more that it did as part of a "lot". Valuable items are being destroyed as a result. For instance, a rare S-100 board in the box with the software to run it and the owner's manual gets separated into a board (that's sold as-is, some software that's sold as-is, and the manual, also sold as-is. If a Buyer does not find all of the auctions, he/she ends up with a paper weight. I've witnessed this Seller buying used S-100 boards for $20 off eBay that were advertised as not working or dead, and turning around and relisrting them for $200. No value added, like testing or a warranty, just a story about how he/she has owned it for years and it worked fine, only it old now, so it's being sold as-is and not tested.

    This Seller can pop up (and he/she does) anywhere in the vintage computer eBay world. If you spot something with what you consider a way below market price, watch and see that Seller will pop up and make a low ball bid. If no one bids against him/them the item will be back soon at five or ten times the price. If you want it, wait until later in the auction period to bid on it, and if no one bids, you will probably win the auction. Vintagecomputermuseum rarely comes back to rebid an item if the price comes off/out of the basement.

    Now, this being said, I do search eBay for floppy disk drives to buy in bulk for resale. In the past I have not resold floppy disk drive on eBay. I'm not sure that the market was ready to pay an leveled price for my reconditioned drives, regardless of the additional value I build into the drives I sell. Lately I've seen drive prices coming up as good used floppy drives become more scarce. The price gap between my price my working and warrantied floppy drives, and eBay Sellers with As-Is drives almost has disappeared.

    I only buy, trade, and sell specific brands of floppy drives, after cleaning, aligning and testing each drive. I don not buy or sell what I consider to be junk drives, poorly designed, poorly built, or built out of inferior materials. I will work on such drives for a fee if a Customer brings a non-working one to me and asks for assistance in having it repaired. I inform the customer of why that particular drive is inferior, and that he will get charged a fee whether the drive is repairable or not to cover my time and the use of my equipment.

    I provide a six-month warranty to private users (warranty for commercial use is shorter now, because a commercial user may be literally using the drive/s 24 hours a day and I have seen drives worn out that way). who buy my drives. That's what I consider to be adding value.

  4. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    Heh! One that surprised me was an Altair 8800 clone. Not the Grant Stockly one, but the other one with the entirely empty case. You could buy it for $620ish. He resold it for $999! He does the same thing with the Newton Apple I boards.. buys em, gets a Woz signature and then tries to flip for several hundred. And succeeds!

    Is he buying this stuff using his vintagecomputermuseum user? Or another? I've never been able to tag him to a purchase.
    He used to. I banned vintagecomputermuseum from bidding on my auctions years ago to try keep him from running up the price on Compupro Boards. Occasionally I end up with boards that are not worth fixing from lots that I got from various sources, and I sell them cheap, with the warning that they were old versions of boards that were not working, I was not able to get them to work, AND further, that I didn't want them to show back up at my business with the Owner trying to get a $150 Flat Rate Repair (my usual flat rate for fixing many/most Compupro boards (that are unmodified).

    Vintagecomputermuseum repeatedly try to buy the old As-Is boards (have been priced between $10-$40 in the past) with me removing his bids.

    I also had some brand new Compupro Disk-2/Selector Channel Sets (8" hard drive controller set) that were advertised cheap on eBay. I bought several trays (25 boards in a tray) directly from Compupro when they were phasing them out. I think I was blowing them out at $25 or $50 a set (two boards). I had to removed his/her/they're bids several times and ended up banning them after the situation did not improve/end.

    I noticed that he has some for sale now (probably ones that someone else bought from me years ago), and he bought from them.

    Vintagecomputermuseum used to used his/her own screen name, but I highly suspect that he is using one or two alias now. I think I recognize his/her/they're Bidding/Buying Pattern. No one can see the unmasked screen names of Buyers unless they are the Buyer or the Seller, so I can only speculate about the Identity of the Buyer/s that I suspect is/are them, so I'm hesitant to out the Buyer/s without proof of their identities.
    Last edited by MicrocomputerSolutions; March 16th, 2016 at 07:55 PM.

  5. #25
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    I didn't think the whole buying and flipping on ebay thing would work given the historical information available there.. but, I guess to some extent it does. His big ticket items don't seem to budge much. I kind of wonder if they are earning a living doing what they're doing.

  6. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    I didn't think the whole buying and flipping on ebay thing would work given the historical information available there.. but, I guess to some extent it does. His big ticket items don't seem to budge much. I kind of wonder if they are earning a living doing what they're doing.


    Anybody can use a Completed Auctions Search, and a Sold Listing Search to see how many items of a specific type or model are being advertised, how many are being sold, and what they are selling for.

    Using that information, you can figure what the high, average, and low selling prices are. Then place bids on items at the low end, or use Buy It Now to grab items that are advertised below the going average rate.

    Once you have sucked up the low priced units, you set your flip price at the high end of the scale and make up a story, telling whatever lies you want to help sell the item/s. If someone really wants that item, now he has to pay your price, or if he does like it, he can always make you an offer. Accepting an offer at lower than your asking price does not hurt your position (if you have more) because eBay masks all final prices that Best Offer or an Accepted/Agreed on Price.

    You test everything so you can pick-off the truly cherry items to sell them at Super Retail. You don't admit that you know anything about the stuff, or that you already tested the stuff, and it's dead junk. You don't fix anything. And you hide behind the Where Is, As-Is, it's old, and what do you expect?

    And that's how they do it.

  7. #27
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    Such sharp vivid photos:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-1983...tkU#ht_114wt_0
    Perhaps it looks that blurry in real life?

  8. #28

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    Man, that dude should go to photography lessons, not to learn but to teach others his ways, that is literally the best photos I have ever seen. 11/10

  9. #29
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    That's about on par with a lot of government surplus auctions, I'd swear some of them go ahead and find a blind person to do the listings. terrible pictures and useless descriptions, even if their sole job is to inventory and list the items for sale.

  10. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Compgeke View Post
    That's about on par with a lot of government surplus auctions, I'd swear some of them go ahead and find a blind person to do the listings. terrible pictures and useless descriptions, even if their sole job is to inventory and list the items for sale.
    I look at auctions with photos that blurry with suspicion. What is the Seller hiding with photos that are so blurry that you can't make out the details? You don't want to bid on a piece of junk that arrives in unusable condition with the Seller claiming in his/her defense that photos of the exact items were posted and it was up to the Buyer to decide whether the condition was good enough.

    Then, the Buyer gets stuck with the return shipping, if he/she wants their money back. What does the Seller risk, when all he has a piece of worthless junk to begin with?

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