Image Map Image Map
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Best Socket 7 CPU? Packard Bell 770 board

  1. #1

    Default Best Socket 7 CPU? Packard Bell 770 board

    I have an old Packard Bell PB770 Board that has a Phoenix BIOS v6.0H dated Jul-1997. It came with an original 133Mhz Pentium and according to Packard bell at that time could support up to a 200Mhz Pentium. I have seen at least one person claim to have upgraded to an MMX Pentium CPU with success.

    I was very young at the time this stuff was current so I am not familiar with what was available for upgrade options. I have read about "power leap" adapters to move to MMX or AMD based processors as well as "overdrive" processors for socket 7 boards but compatibility can be questionable. I can grab a 200Mhz regular Pentium on ebay but with prices very cheap I wanted to ask if there was something better to try. Perhaps a Pentium MMX 233Mhz or an AMD K6-3?

    Any help is appreciated with understanding this old technology, converters, and my options.

    Here is an old site with info I found around my board. http://www.oocities.org/sjg/pb770.html#Jumpers

    Here is a pic
    Last edited by protivakid; May 10th, 2016 at 10:27 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    I've got the following Socket 7 CPUs if any are of interest:

    1) Intel Pentium MMX 233

    2) AMD-K6-2/500AFX

    3) AMD-K6-2+/500ACZ

    4) Cyrix M II 300GP 66MHZ

    5) AMD-K5 PR133 ABR 66MHZ 3.52V

    I have heat sinks and fans for some of them.

    FWIW... none of this stuff is actually considered vintage.
    Last edited by Stone; May 10th, 2016 at 12:11 PM.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,570
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    The best the jumpers permit is 200 MHz. The best Socket 7 chip with a 66 MHz bus is the Cyrix 300 MHz.

    The easiest and most compatible option is a 200 MHz Pentium which should be cheap. Note that the cache supplied by Packard Bell is limited so very fast chips will be hampered. Don't expect too much from it.

    Practice your solder skills; you will need them to replace the battery which if it hasn't failed yet will do so soon.

  4. #4

    Default

    According to the page you linked the PB770 motherboard only supports CPU voltages of 3.3 and 3.5 volts. The MMX CPUs, and later, used split voltages: you need 3.3V for the bus I/O but the core itself uses 2.8V. I don't think your board is going to do that, and it will cause problems if you try to run it all at 3.3V. Pentium P54C vs P55C (MMX).

  5. #5

    Default

    I used to put k6/2 and clock them with a 66mhz FSB so a 500 might be running at 466 to boost aging pentiums back in the day, but those were all upgrades for MMX systems (forgot about the split voltages before I posted heh)

  6. #6

    Default

    I was very interested in the K6-3 CPU's as those have L2 cache which my board lacks. This site details some upgrades to similar Packard Bell boards using Power leap adapters to handle the voltage differences. The only problem is the OP said a 3rd party BIOS update is needed.

    http://www.oocities.org/sjg/power/plk6III.html

    I doubt even if this did exist for my specific board I can track it down in 2016. It took me 2 days to track down the official packard bell bios update. I know little to nothing about 90's computer hardware so any input is appreciated.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,570
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Powerleaps were made in small numbers. It will probably be a lot cheaper to purchase a system from about 2000 to get the same CPU installed. You also won't be saddled with the slow memory and hard disk interface of the Packard Bell. Cache can only paper over so many flaws of the hardware.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    Practice your solder skills; you will need them to replace the battery which if it hasn't failed yet will do so soon.
    Just replaced this last night using my amateur skills

    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    Powerleaps were made in small numbers. It will probably be a lot cheaper to purchase a system from about 2000 to get the same CPU installed. You also won't be saddled with the slow memory and hard disk interface of the Packard Bell. Cache can only paper over so many flaws of the hardware.
    I have some 2001 era motherboards and this machine is yet another little project. I am just looking for the best CPU I can throw in for some basic DOS/Win95 era games. Pentium 200Mhz seems to be the easiest. A MMX won't go in without an adapter, correct? Cyrix / AMd chips need adapters as well, right?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •