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Thread: Period correct vs beefed-up hardware

  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey View Post
    Stock can be fun. It depends on your goals.

    It's nice to have a stock XT with the original 10Mb hard drive & Xebec controller, but don't ask me how I'm supposed to back that sucker up, since even parallel-port Zip drives are only useful with 286 & later systems...
    Have you tried PalmZIP? It worked well for me on an XT clone. The full software was still available as of two years ago when I bought it.
    Wanted: TU56, RK05, VT52/100, Altair 8800 CPU card, KD11-A, KE8E (M8340 M8341), memory for 11/40.
    Available for trade: AlphaStation DS10, DS15, Numerous PC ISA, PCI, and VLB boards and motherboards from the 5150 to P4 era, DEC Storageworks HDDs, misc DIP ICs, QBUS cards, 8080/85/86/88/Z80 CPUs, VT420, Misc radio valves (vacuum tubes), C64, Amiga 1200, Sinclair/TRS-80 spares, Mac Classic + Classic II.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Cave Junction, Oregon
    Posts
    91

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    I like to max out mine as they would have been maxed out back in the good old days. This means, for example, CPU upgrades limited to those available in the 80's (6309, 65802); RAM upgrades using OEM hardware (512k to 1.25Mb); and the best storage available at the time (340k-400k 5.25", 720k-800k 3.5", 20Mb-80Mb Hdd.) I see little use for 20Mhz 65816's, 8Mb-32Mb RAM and Terrabyte SSD's when very little software will use it anyway.
    I love the _idea_ of the new "one inch floppy drives" (SD card readers) for classics, but I hate using disk images. These are probably the only neo-retro hardware I'll use, but only if I can access the whole card as one drive.
    Then, of course, there's the old "official third party" stuff, like Disto, CMD, ICD, or Applied Engineering. These companies had little trouble with compatibility like some cheaper third party hardware occasionally did, went far beyond the OEM's own hardware, (Tandy's RAM upgrade for the CoCo was 512k, Disto went up to 2mb; Apple's RAM boards were 1Mb, but Applied Engineering went up to 8Mb) and was more of less endorsed by or connected to the OEM. This amazing hardware wasn't hard to get or all that expensive in the good old days, but today, I'd have to sell the town I live in to afford the CMD of ICD stuff. (I wouldn't mind getting rid of this horrible place, but I don't own it.) I think I'll have to stick with what I could get at the local Sears or Radio Shack back then.

  3. #33

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    I think sometimes out-of-era hardware may be a necessary "evil". Imagine trying to run an old XT with an era accurate hard disk, but that disk has failed. What do you do? Buy a modern drive for a low price and use XT-IDE, or spend a lot of money for an era accurate drive that could be on the brink of failure?

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Cave Junction, Oregon
    Posts
    91

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    I know there are 8-bit ISA IDE controllers. All you need is an IDE to MSATSA adapter and a DOS patch for terrabyte drives.

    Cloud-9 (a CoCo dealer) sold an IDE to compact flash adapter. That would probably be the ideal solution.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Fairfield, Ohio
    Posts
    455

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    Never heard of it. Looks interesting!

    P.S. I do have an old copy of Fastback around here somewhere. Dunno if it still works. Might be interesting to see if I can back up my old XT with off of the 360K floppy...

    P.P.S. Someone mentioned XT-IDE cards. Last I saw a decent one ran ~ $70, which is $69 more than I can afford right now, alas. On the other hand none of the systems with hard drives are showing any problems. Yet.

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