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Thread: Model 12 and multiple drive units

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Morisset, NSW Australia
    Posts
    174

    Default Model 12 and multiple drive units

    Surprised no one's mentioned This guy yet. 5 different Model II disk units, and a Model 12. No bids on any of them.

    Anyone close enough to Virginia to go get them? (Bit far for me . . .)

    PJH

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    3,614

    Default

    Saw it as well. But I am not that close to Virginia. However a little bit close than you are PJH. Besides I really don't like those cruddy White plastic cases. To easy to break
    *FrankG*
    Just a few old dust collectors that work! Sort of! Or when they decide to!
    TRS-80 Model 4 , Model III, Pentium 233 "Tweener"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    429
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    He sold two imperfect Model II's back in April. They were referenced here at the time, but I can't readily find it.

    Mike

  4. #4

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    Too bad the Seller is too far away for me. Otherwise, I would buy the units for the floppy drives alone.

  5. #5

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    A couple of those Model II Disk Expansion units are the rare late TPI versions. These were released very late in the Model II run and replaced the CDC drives used previously with a TPI 8" floppy drive. You can tell the difference because the TPI drives use the Shugart-like buttons, but the LED is offset rather than centered on the button. I have not found any documentation on these TPI 8" drives but I believe them to be basically Shugart clones. I don't know if this was a cost saving move on Tandy's part or if the Shugart SA800 was simply no longer available by this time circa 1982. I have a 8" TPI drive in a late Model II and it looks very similar to the SA800 with some slight differences.

  6. #6

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    Shugart SA800s were in high production in the early 1980s. Radio Shack probably licensed the drives for self-manufacture to try to lower the cost, and to improve drive availability.

    I don't think Radio Shack had much of a choice about changing drive suppliers. By 1982, the writing was on the wall for CDC as far as 8" floppy manufacturing and sales goes. They weren't spending the money on R&D, Production, or Marketing, and Production Economics were going to run right over them in soon. A few years later, Alan Shugart decided to abandon 8" and 5.25" floppy drive manufacture, and sold Shugart Associates to Xerox, as he saw hard drives as taking over in the future. Like CDC, Xerox soon stopped spending money on R&D, and production, choosing to let 8" floppy designs and production die (along with Shugart Associates), when they went on at other companies up to close to 1990.

    The Pity was that Shugart has the SA-810 and SA-860, which never got a chance to take-off even though they were the best of the 1/2 height 8" floppy drives. The Mitsubishi M2896-63 flourished with the lack of competition from the clearly inferior Qume DT-242, and Tandon TM-848 designs.

    Shugart was also manufacturing SA-800s in Japan, and Mexico by that time. Not all of the 8" floppy drives were being made in the USA by then, due to demand outstripping production.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    360

    Default

    I saw them too.

    If you live in Europe (Holland) there are some problems with these disk units.
    At first they are for the USA market, that means 110 Volt 60 Herz.
    The spindle motor runs on 110 volt too and cannot set to 220 volt.
    If you use the drives on 50 Hz. the spindle speed is 20% to low, which can only be changed with new pulleys. (They are not available)
    And if you have seen the shipping costs to Europe, you surely are not interested anymore.
    The shipping cost are a large problem sending parcels from the USA or Australia to Europe, the costs have exploded since Ebay has
    introduced the ' Global Shipping Program'

  8. #8

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    I agree with you, Hans.

    Also, that machine would get smashed to pieces if it were shipped to Europe - no doubt about it.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hans01 View Post
    I saw them too.

    If you live in Europe (Holland) there are some problems with these disk units.
    At first they are for the USA market, that means 110 Volt 60 Herz.
    The spindle motor runs on 110 volt too and cannot set to 220 volt.
    If you use the drives on 50 Hz. the spindle speed is 20% to low, which can only be changed with new pulleys. (They are not available)
    And if you have seen the shipping costs to Europe, you surely are not interested anymore.
    The shipping cost are a large problem sending parcels from the USA or Australia to Europe, the costs have exploded since Ebay has
    introduced the ' Global Shipping Program'

    You can solve the problem by buying 220Vac spindle motors with 50hz pulleys, and the extra drive long belts that are used with them as a set. The fabric drive belts have not been made in years, so don't buy motors and pulleys without them.

    I get 220V motors and pulleys sometimes when I buy lots of 8" drives for repair and reconditioning or parts. In the past, I used to give dozens of 220Vac motor sets to a Friend's father who used them to motorize the display cabinets that he built for his rock collection. And for some reason, occasionally people here in the US send in drives for repair that have 50hz motors and pulleys on them (they didn't even know that their drives had the wrong parts on them, only that their drives were not working correctly). The 50hz parts caused disk rotation to be wrong, and throw the index pulse timing off, so they get replaced on every drive I service that is for use here in the US. Since I sell mostly Shugarts, what I usually have is the motors, belts, and pulleys that are used in sets on Shugart 800 and 850 full height floppy drives.

    At one time, there was a discussion and some people who tried to get together to have new 110Vac/60hz belts made, but from what I read, it never happened and the cost of the belts would have been over $50 each. I will sell a set of good used parts (they usually look like new) consisting of the 220Vac motor with the wiring and connectors, 50hz pulley, and a belt for $50, plus shipping.

    I took a quick look at shipping rates and to Holland, shipping would cost about $35 by First Class Mail (no telling how long it would take), or $50 by Global Priority Mail, for a single set of parts, OR $68 for Global Priority Mail Flat Rate Box (you could fit 6-8 sets of parts in one of these boxes, estimated to take 6-10 days).

    I probably have 6-8 sets right now.

    Sellers here in the US never see the complete price that Buyers in other Countries pay for shipping when eBay Global Shipping in involved. Sellers are only responsible and worry about getting the items to eBay's Shipping Collection Locations. The Buyer is the one that gets stuck paying for eBay's Shipper Services (which eBay appears to be free to charge whatever they want for). That's the cost of buying from the US for eBay Members in other Countries. Sellers here in the US can lower the cost of shipping to other Countries for Buyers by arranging for shipping outside of eBay's Global Shipping, but then risk the loss of the item, the cost of shipping, and the payment for the item, if something goes wrong.
    Last edited by MicrocomputerSolutions; September 8th, 2016 at 03:39 AM.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by JonB View Post
    I agree with you, Hans.

    Also, that machine would get smashed to pieces if it were shipped to Europe - no doubt about it.
    True and that M12 is already in bad shape from the looks of it. It lived a hard life like most of our big Tandys.

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