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Thread: Compaq Portable website

  1. #1
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    Default Compaq Portable website

    check out my site for these machines:

    www.firstibmclone.fsnet.co.uk

    Get set up disk downloads, hints on repair and message board.

  2. #2

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    Please don't take this the wrong way, but the Compaq was not the first IBM PC clone.

    It was certainly one of the earliest, the most compatible and obviously the most successful, but the first was the Columbia Data Products MPC.

    Either way, you've got a really nice site set up there!

    Erik

  3. #3
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    "Erik" wrote in message:

    > Please don't take this the wrong way, but the Compaq was
    > not the first IBM PC clone.

    > It was certainly one of the earliest, the most compatible
    > and obviously the most successful, but the first was the
    > Columbia Data Products MPC.

    I don't know if it's true or not, but I thought someone said
    that the Columbia based machines weren't true IBM
    compatables because they use a seperate version of
    CP/M-86 than to the IBM version of CP/M-86.

    > Either way, you've got a really nice site set up there! :)

    Well anyway, we could have a long Discussion about this,
    but it wouldn't change anything! ;-)

    Cheers.

  4. #4

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    I agree that the original Columbia machines weren't nearly as compatible as the Compaq, but they were designed to be PC clones and compete in the same space, for what that's worth.

    Erik

  5. #5
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    "Erik" wrote in message:

    > I agree that the original Columbia machines weren't
    > nearly as compatible as the Compaq, but they were
    > designed to be PC clones and compete in the same
    > space, for what that's worth.

    So you're saying that they weren't compatable, but
    competition.

    For some odd reason I seem to seperate the early
    IBMs & compatables from the other machines like
    the Victor 9000 (or Sirus .... name escapes me),
    DEC Rainbow, early Zenith machines.

    Cheers.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by CP/M User
    So you're saying that they weren't compatable, but
    competition.
    Well, no. . .

    I'm saying that they intended to be compatible but just didn't do as good a job as the engineers at Compaq.

    Victor, for instance, didn't bother with trying, they just used a similar architecture almost by happenstance.

    The fact that you can read an IBM PC disk on a Columbia but not an early Victor 9000 is some proof that the two companies had different goals.

    I wish I had my PC Magazines at hand rather then in storage, but if I recall, The Columbia was probably about 90-95% PC compatible while the compaq was 99.9%. The Victor would be under 50%. . .

    Erik

    Erik

  7. #7
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    "Erik" wrote in message:

    >> So you're saying that they weren't compatable, but
    >> competition.

    > Well, no. . .

    > I'm saying that they intended to be compatible but just
    > didn't do as good a job as the engineers at Compaq.

    > Victor, for instance, didn't bother with trying, they just
    > used a similar architecture almost by happenstance.

    > The fact that you can read an IBM PC disk on a
    > Columbia but not an early Victor 9000 is some proof
    > that the two companies had different goals.

    > I wish I had my PC Magazines at hand rather then in
    > storage, but if I recall, The Columbia was probably
    > about 90-95% PC compatible while the compaq was
    > 99.9%. The Victor would be under 50%. . .

    The hardware interrupts (the IBM compatable provide)
    might be an issue on the Columbia, I think back when
    the MS Flight Simulator came out, it was one way of
    testing to see if your machine was IBM compatable.

    I'm not sure, but the Victor might have came out
    before the IBM Personal Computer as well. So it's
    just a machine in it's own right I suppose you could
    say! :-) But it ran MS-DOS, so perhaps they came
    out the same time, I'm not sure.

    Cheers.

  8. #8
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    The Columbia beat the Compaq to market by several months. I've not found a program for the IBM PC that wouldn't run on the Columbia. It even ran FlightSim. The hardware may have been another story, tho. Not all cards designed for the IBM would run on the Columbia.

    --T
    Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
    _____________________________________________

    Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

  9. #9
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    "Terry Yager" wrote in message:

    > The Columbia beat the Compaq to market
    > by several months. I've not found a
    > program for the IBM PC that wouldn't run
    > on the Columbia. It even ran FlightSim.
    > The hardware may have been another
    > story, tho. Not all cards designed for the
    > IBM would run on the Columbia.

    Well that's interesting. Some of the programs
    I've written in Turbo Pascal under CP/M-86
    might prove to be problem cause they tend
    to go to the hardware. If the Columbia uses a
    CGA for it's display, then the program I've
    posted into the 'Programming' Section should
    run on it. Even if you don't have Turbo Pascal
    3, it's perfectly legal to download from the
    Borland Museum (you'll need to register there
    though). I wouldn't recommend it, if it uses
    mono.

    Cheers.

  10. #10
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    Hell, come to think of it, not all the boards designed for the ibm would run on an ibm.

    --T
    Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
    _____________________________________________

    Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

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