Image Map Image Map
Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 96

Thread: A capture card to flawlessly record VHS

  1. #21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 6885P5H View Post
    This time base correction seems suspicious to me by the way... So time base correction would be able to able to clean the signal recorded on a very very wrinkled area of a tape? Also I'm afraid that it might malfunction and mess up a good signal...
    Think of TBC as more like a buffer. I'm deliberately oversimplifying here, but the basic notion is this: to account for the mechanical instability of the tape and mechanism, the TBC takes video in and clocks it out at a steady known rate. If the tape is faster than the rate, the TBC holds the frames; if it's slower, it clocks out frames in its memory. TBC will only be present on higher end devices where pros would actually care about it (and these would be the first people to notice a bad implementation). You're not going to get a good reliable transfer without it -- you might get lucky on some tapes, but others will be really crummy. Don't be afraid of it.

    A TBC will not be able to correct a totally whacked section of tape, but it will at least keep the stream continuous, and there are some units that can actually patch the video with previous frames (drop out compensation) which is better than nothing.

    As njroadfan said, capturing VHS well costs money. Don't cheap out if this means something to you.
    I use my C128 because I am an ornery, stubborn, retro grouch. -- Bob Masse
    Machine room updated for 2019!: http://www.floodgap.com/etc/machines.html

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Cheltenham, UK
    Posts
    1

    Default

    I use a Haupage box to do this - they can be got on bale for £30 or so... e.g. http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Hauppauge-...sAAOSwPCVX9PhA (no its not me selling that one!).

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Western North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    1,330

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    ...The only catch is that you need a FireWire port, which has pretty much disappeared from modern computers (although if you have a Mac with a Thunderbolt port you can use an adapter to connect FireWire to it). If you have a desktop with PCI slots or a laptop with a PCMCIA or ExpressCard slot you can easily add a FireWire card, but if all you have are USB ports, you're SOL (no, cheap FireWire to USB adapters will not work).
    This is a great thread; I even researched on the analog passthrough mini dv camcorders, selected a ZR700, and purchased for a good deal. My Dell Precision M6700 laptop has firewire (3rd-gen Core i7-3740QM); most Dell Precision and Latitude models do and did. A Latitude D820, D830, or a Precision M65 or M4300 would be usable for this, as would my previous M6500. The Precision M6700 can be had for $500-700 or so and is a solid laptop. The M6500 and M6600 (and even the M6400) would be usable, and are less expensive. Dell still sells the M6800, with the 4th-gen i5/i7, meaning the M6700 is just a little out of date. Mine is about three years old, and is snappy running from the Crucial MX200 SSD and with 16GB of RAM.
    --
    Thus spake Tandy Xenix System III version 3.2: "Bughlt: Sckmud Shut her down Scotty, she's sucking mud again!"

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    6,444
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    Don't use a capture card. Use a DV camcorder with analog passthrough
    This is very easy, but the only time I would not do this is if your VHS source has a lot of computer-generated titles with color, or high-contrast color edges. This is because DV uses a 4:1:1 colorspace which will cause noticable chroma stair-stepping, for example:



    A lot of the footage I capture and process has footage of vintage computer output (or is itself vintage computer output), so I have to be mindful of this and I always capture 4:2:2 or higher using a capture card. But for most analog VHS, DV is fine.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775, Olivetti M24, or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Québec, Canada
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Sooo pretty much everyone that answered this thread have their own ways of doing this... vwestlife's method is the one I would like to try out the most but that really depends on how hard these DV camcorders are to acquire. The footage he showed in his youtube video really impressed me. Could someone tell me what are some of the models of camcorder I should look for if I wanna try vwestlife's method?
    • Computers I'm looking for: Olivetti M380-40 • Olivetti M486 • Olivetti M6 620 suprema • HP Vectra VL 6/400

  6. #26

    Default

    Here are most of the consumer-grade Sony Handycam models with analog passthrough (what Sony calls "signal convert function" or "A/V → DV Out" mode):

    MiniDV:
    DCR-TRV18
    DCR-TRV25
    DCR-TRV27
    DCR-TRV50
    DCR-TRV950
    DCR-TRV22
    DCR-TRV33
    DCR-TRV38
    DCR-TRV39
    DCR-TRV70
    DCR-TRV80
    DCR-HC30
    DCR-HC40
    DCR-HC65
    DCR-HC85
    DCR-HC1000
    DCR-HC90
    DCR-HC96 (requires matching Handycam Station)
    DCR-PC101
    DCR-PC105
    DCR-PC330
    DCR-PC109
    DCR-PC350
    DCR-PC1000
    DCR-PC55 (requires matching Handycam Station)

    Digital8:
    DCR-TRV240
    DCR-TRV340
    DCR-TRV740
    DCR-TRV840
    DCR-TRV350
    DCR-TRV460
    DCR-TRV480

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Dublin, CA USA
    Posts
    2,897
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    I'd like to ask a related question. Does any one have tips on how to do this, but with PAL VHS tapes? I have one or two from South Africa that I would love to digitize.

    IBM 5160 - 360k, 1.44Mb Floppies, NEC V20, 8087-3, 45MB MFM Hard Drive, Vega 7 Graphics, IBM 5154 Monitor running MS-DOS 5.00
    IBM PCJr Model 48360 640kb RAM, NEC V20,, jrIDE Side Cart, 360kb Floppy drives running MS-DOS 5.00
    Evergreen Am5x86-133 64Mb Ram, 8gb HDD, SB16 in a modified ATX case running IBM PC-DOS 7.10

  8. #28

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lutiana View Post
    I'd like to ask a related question. Does any one have tips on how to do this, but with PAL VHS tapes? I have one or two from South Africa that I would love to digitize.
    First you need a PAL or multi-system VCR. NTSC VCRs cannot play PAL tapes.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Location
    Québec, Canada
    Posts
    299

    Default

    Thank you vwestlife for the list but man these cameras are a lot harder to acquire than I thought they would be. Maybe in the meantime I could try the method seen in Trixter's video which consists of first buying a cheap 20$ capture device from ebay? I still don't get how such a thing would be able to do anything good but uhhmmm yeah maybe these cheap 20$ things can actually be amazing!
    • Computers I'm looking for: Olivetti M380-40 • Olivetti M486 • Olivetti M6 620 suprema • HP Vectra VL 6/400

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    6,444
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    All of the footage in that tutorial video was from the cheap $20 device (intentionally, to prove a point), and I even set the capture settings to defaults, so you can see it's capable of more-than-acceptable capture. You just have to post-process it correctly so that you get 60p output, otherwise it stops looking like videotape.

    vwestlife's DV camera suggestion isn't for cost, it's for convenience and stability. The nice thing about running analog video through the DV camera and having the camera perform the conversion is that any screwups in the tape are masked by the conversion: You always get 30i DV output from the camera no matter how bad the tape is, so you don't need to buy a TBC. And the DV format is supported by nearly every video package, so you can work with it everywhere. So as long as you don't have any computer-generated titles in your footage (see 4:1:1 colorspace comment above), it's a very convenient option.
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775, Olivetti M24, or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •