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Thread: PET 2001 with the wrong plug

  1. #1

    Default PET 2001 with the wrong plug

    I recently obtained a 2001-16N which was described as non-working, I am UK based and the machine has
    a standard UK 240v/13A plug fitted, on inspection I noticed that the PET is a 115v 60 Hz model and I assume a US
    model that someone has changed the plug on.

    I don't know if someone has plugged this into a 240v supply but I doubt it as the fuse in the screw in holder
    has not blown.

    Is anyone able to tell me if the 2001-16N is a US model (the serial number is o708917)?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK - Worcester
    Posts
    1,520

    Default

    Hi James,

    Welcome to the forum.

    It may be a US model converted to run on the UK mains supply of course (the plate now being wrong). The only way to truly know is to "lift the PET lid" and have a look at how the transformer primary winding is wired. In series = UK, parallel = US.

    The fuse should have been changed to suit as well of course...

    If you need any more info just ask.

    Where are you located in the U.K.?

    Dave

  3. #3

    Default

    Hi Dave and thanks for the welcome,

    Not sure about the transformer but it looks different to UK ones that I have seen photos of and whilst its hard to read I'm fairly sure the fuse is 115v.
    (photo attached I hope)

    I'm based in Essex and you?

    JamesPET.jpg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK - Worcester
    Posts
    1,520

    Default

    I will check which transformer part number I have in my 8032 when I get a bit of free time.

    What is the current (A) rating of the fuse you have? That is the key thing...

    The photograph is of the transformer secondary connections (and the part number of course). Can you provide me with a photograph of the primary side connections. I think (for a -03 transformer) the wire colours should be red and white not black and white.

    I am in Worcester.

    Dave

  5. #5

    Default

    Hi Dave,

    Apologies for my ignorance of such matters but not sure where I can view the primary side connections, I assume these are the ones from the mains cable to the back of the tranny, they appear to be covered between the rear of the case and the tranny itself by a metal box that is held onto the baseboard by one bolt/nut and a tag in the side of the case, I havent removed that if that is where I find it.

    As far as the fuse goes I have the following from each of the metal caps:

    at one end:
    BUSS MDL 1 6/10

    at the other:
    125 VOLT

    So no amperage given that I know how to read.

    Regards

    James

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK - Worcester
    Posts
    1,520

    Default

    Hi James,

    I managed to find a bit of time this morning to open the bonnet of my 8032. The transformer I have (which I know is 240V) has a part number of 5803245-00 (which doesn't match with any Commodore documentation I have seen so far). The machine has a plate which is for 240V and a 0.5A fuse (which is also correct for 240V mains).

    This leaves you with a couple of scenarios:

    1. The machine you have is an import that has been modified for UK mains (but the plate says otherwise).
    2. The machine you have is a 110V model - and some bright spark (not) has put a UK plug on it.

    In scenario 1 you could disconnect the transformer from the PET main board, plug it into a wall socket and measure the voltages on the secondary of the transformer with a multimeter. The downside of this is that if it is a 110V transformer primary you will certainly do some damage to the transformer if the fuse doesn't blow fast... For this reason I wouldn't take this course of action!

    This leaves us assuming it is a 110V transformer and some idiot has put the wrong plug on it. In this case I would use a 240/110V step down transformer to power the unit and measure the voltages on the transformer secondaries with the PET powered from 110V (and disconnected from the main board again). If I read 'half' (ish) the voltages I am expecting - I can be pretty certain it is a 240V transformer and I would put a UK plug on it and away we go. If I read the voltages I am expecting - I know it is a 110V transformer and (therefore) would not be able to power it directly from a 240V socket without modification.

    I have such a transformer available (some of my computer equipment is 110V) that I would be willing to lend you for an experiment - but how to get it to you - or the PET to me? I may be in the South East presently with work if that helps and we could find a convenient place to meet up?

    There is another way of doing this - but I will leave this explanation to a later time if that is OK with you? I would go with the 240V/110V step-down transformer option first if it was me.

    As to the fuse - the markings for current breaking capacity make no sense to me. The fact that it is 125 VOLT leads me to suspect (like you) that this may be a 110V import or someone has forgotten to change the fuse when they converted it to 240V.

    Incidentally, industrial users tend to use 110V equipment. Our own test equipment on power stations tends to be 110V - so this machine may have originally come from an industrial installation and some bright spark has put the wrong plug on (as you suspect). You wouldn't believe the hassle we get when we specify that we need to purchase 110V equipment in the the UK!

    Dave

  7. #7

    Default

    A lot of our industrial stuff is 100V..!

    Anyway, the fuse is 1.6A, which would be fine for 125V, but not so fine for 240V. In fact, if you have a 115V transformer and a 1.6A fuse, I wouldn't be the least bit surprised if the fuse survived a 240V mishap. So, do check the transformer.

    So long as the secondary is disconnected, you may be able to get away with 240V on the primary for testing purposes. But don't. It's much safer to do what Dave says and test it with 120V, 24V, or whatever you have handy 120V or lower. Transformers convert by direct ratio. So a 115V transformer on 240V will give you double the values you should have. On 24V it will give you 20% the values you should have. On 120V it will give you approximately the right values.

    If it turns out you do have a 240V transformer, please get a 240V (or higher) 1/2A fuse.
    Be polite and I may let you live.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK - Worcester
    Posts
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    Default

    A bit more googling identified that fuse as a 1.6A - thanks for the clarification KC.

    All indications are that the previous owner perhaps was 'electrically challenged' shall we say...

    +1 for KC's "get the correct fuse if it turns out to be a 240V transformer"! Otherwise you are putting yourself at risk (the fuse is there as a protection device and - if it sized incorrectly - doesn't provide the required protection).

    Dave

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by daver2 View Post
    A bit more googling identified that fuse as a 1.6A - thanks for the clarification KC.
    Those numbers are poorly inscribed fractions. 1-6/10 would be better. Some brands will stamp them 16/10, without the space. I think we ran into that in another thread here once. An older one of the same value might even read 13/5!
    Be polite and I may let you live.

  10. #10

    Default

    Just an update to this old post, I finally got round to powering the Pet on, it does run on 240v, unfortunately not much more to report apart from that, initially there was nothing on the screen but once I adjusted the brightness to full I could see horizontal lines (first pic), and on powering down the Commodore Basic line was displayed, this was for the briefest of moments as the power went off so much so that I had to film in slow motion and capture that one frame (second pic) hence the poor quality.

    Where does this leave me, not sure if to consider a professional restoration or reusing the case for a NUC or Pi.
    Pet1.jpg
    Pet2.jpg

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