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Thread: 8088 PC: Cool things to demonstrate the early PC XT experience and capabilities

  1. #21
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    for me it is Xenix or similar early Unices or for graphics then this: VisiON http://toastytech.com/guis/vision.html

  2. #22
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    My vote goes to Sydex's 22Disk and 22Nice, or any of Dave Dunfield's code.

    I find this site to be a useful source; also have uploaded some of the titles in my library: https://winworldpc.com/library

    -CH-

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigwil View Post
    for me it is Xenix or similar early Unices or for graphics then this: VisiON http://toastytech.com/guis/vision.html
    Ah yes, VisiOn. With VisiCalc's success one wonders how they didn't garner serious attention.
    I don't remember it at all. Never hit my radar. Even a great name.
    Its probably been debated many times. I would venture a guess that in CGA monochrome it
    just didn't have the screen real estate to be viable. Hercules resolution would have shown been better
    if they could have been tied in with the development.
    That's where Valdocs on the QX-10 probably had a visual appeal edge. Hi res on the QX-10 was relatively nice.
    Both lacked icons a graphical environment with the iconic "icons" so at a glance the layman may
    not have perceived the big difference from other software.
    Also VisiOn was released late, was pricey and its operating environment precluded running other apps- ouch.

    But it was a bold innovations! This definitely deserves to be something to demo.
    There are some challenges in its requirements- fat12, mouse systems mouse.

    This is interesting to me as a software developer, from that website:

    "A very interesting feature of Visi On is the way it was designed. It was designed to be portable to other OSes such as CP/M or Unix, or to other CPUs besides the 8086. It did this by providing a kind of non machine specific "virtual machine" (called the Visi Machine) that all applications were written for. Only the very core of Visi On (called the Visi Host) was machine specific.

    Applications were developed in "Visi C", a fairly restricted subset of C designed for maximum portability. The development environment was Unix based and included a non-graphical version of the Visi-Host that let portions of Visi-On applications be run and tested on Unix.

    Sounds kind of like Java or .Net doesn't it?"

    Yes it does.

    After quite some time poking around, I still can't answer a fundamental question:
    who's brain child was all of that portabiliy/virtual machine computer science? I can't find a quick answer.
    I met Bob Franston at VCFEast a few years ago, and he spoke of some virtual machine concepts developed
    for VisiCalc, so was it Vision's technical underpinnings his?

    I guess so if "they" in sentence two refers to Software Arts.

    From Dan Bricklin's site:
    "The main reason is that just as Software Arts was thinking of going public it was hit by a lawsuit from VisiCorp, Dan Flystra's renamed distribution company. They were just in the process of producing VisiOn, which they though would replace VisiCalc as their best earner. There were lots or arguments between Software Arts and VisiCorp but the final split resulted in a $60 million lawsuit alleging that Software Arts had failed to enhance VisiCalc and produce new versions. Software Arts hit back with a lawsuit claiming that VisiCorp had favored its own products at the expense of VisiCalc."

    another good vision read https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.p...tem_type=topic

  4. #24
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    Also worth finding a copy of the 360k QNX demo disk (yes, there was one back then).

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by clh333 View Post
    My vote goes to Sydex's 22Disk and 22Nice, or any of Dave Dunfield's code.

    I find this site to be a useful source; also have uploaded some of the titles in my library: https://winworldpc.com/library

    -CH-
    Thank you.
    These are interesting examples of what it took to bridge oneself from the CP/M 8 bit world
    into the bold new Intel 16 bit world. For certain audiences that can be interesting!
    I just started to use them last year (after all this time!) :O

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by bhtooefr View Post
    Also worth finding a copy of the 360k QNX demo disk (yes, there was one back then).
    Oh interesting! I knew of it but never got a chance to see it back in the day.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dmemphis View Post

    Regarding VisiOn:

    After quite some time poking around, I still can't answer a fundamental question:
    who's brain child was all of that portabiliy/virtual machine computer science? I can't find a quick answer.
    [/url]
    In another post "another rabbit hole" on the TRS-80 genre, the answer came forth related to
    a z80 verison of smalltalk.
    The answer is Rosetta!
    It is spelled out in clear term what they did on the project:

    http://web.archive.org/web/200404011...etta-smalltalk

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