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Thread: Cleaning sticker residue from EPROM chips (which solvent?)

  1. #11
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    Goo Gone is what I usually use for adhesives/sticker residue. I then follow it up with Iso Prop. to get rid of the citrus residue. Works great. However try it out first to make sure it doesnt remove the marking.

    If you don't have goo gone, you can use Mayonnaise. Yes the condiment. It gets rid of sticker residue too. Don't laugh until you try it. Just use Iso Prop after to get rid of that residue...

  2. #12

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    I keep a small bottle of 50/50 acetone and 70% isopropyl Alcohol on my workbench, great for removing flux after soldering and makes quick work of removing labels from Ceramic Eproms.

    Not good however for anything with plastic. It also wipes the markings from all of the Remarked/Counterfeit IC's from China

    - Gary

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    I just use (carefully) WD-40 and a qtip.
    On a cerDIP UVEPROM, exactly what are you trying to avoid damaging? Short of HF, I don't know of much that will affect the encapsulation, though I'd keep acids away from the leads.

    In the old days, I'd probably use Freon TF.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    On a cerDIP UVEPROM, exactly what are you trying to avoid damaging? Short of HF, I don't know of much that will affect the encapsulation, though I'd keep acids away from the leads.

    In the old days, I'd probably use Freon TF.
    Since I've never just sprayed it on, I don't know what effect it would have on the "window". Probably none, but, I do like to be careful.
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  5. #15
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    I just use isopropyl alcohol, it works well enough.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Druid6900 View Post
    Since I've never just sprayed it on, I don't know what effect it would have on the "window". Probably none, but, I do like to be careful.
    The window has to pass short-wave UV, so it's quartz (SiO2). Quartz is pretty tough stuff.

  7. #17

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    Stoddard Solvent.
    Sounds fancy, but I'm really just repeating Chuck(G)'s advice above - it's mineral spirits.
    The same stuff is sold as barbecue lighter fluid, so it's cheap and easy to get hold of.

    It works much better than any of the alcohols.

    For paper labels without a coating, you can use a Q tip to saturate the label.
    Leave it for a couple of minutes and it will practically fall off.

    For coated paper labels, peel off the top plastic layer and then treat as above.


    One useful aspect is that if you let the label dry out again, it can often be reused - useful for warranty labels

    You can even use it to peel a label off a cardboard box without damage to either the label or the box.
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  8. #18
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    I use the same to remove floppy labels. I wet them thoroughy, bundle them up and let the stuff soak in for a couple of days.

    The labels come right off without any residue that can't be wiped off with a rag.

    FWIW, WD-40 is largely Stoddard solvent also.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I use the same to remove floppy labels. I wet them thoroughy, bundle them up and let the stuff soak in for a couple of days.

    The labels come right off without any residue that can't be wiped off with a rag.

    FWIW, WD-40 is largely Stoddard solvent also.
    It's great isn't it? Makes even the toughest label peel off like a Post-it.

    Another bonus is that I have never known it to damage any type of plastic.
    Perfectly safe to use on ABS, which is what most computer stuff is made of.

    I've even soaked ABS in it overnight.
    I had to remove some of that extremely stubborn white double sided foam tape.

    It takes longer to soak in because of the plastic foam, but once it penetrates, the foam just falls off.
    Interestingly, it didn't do any damage to the foam either - just dissolved the adhesive.
    Current Machines:
    MAME Arcade Cabinet, Retropie Console (x86), NEC 8401A Portable Computer, Toshiba T1200XE, Gateway GP6-400 (Pentium II), Gateway GP7-450 (Pentium III), Dell l550r (Pentium III)
    Stranded at my Mom's House in the UK:
    Sinclair ZX81, Sinclair ZX Spectrum 48K, Sinclair ZX Spectrum+ 48K, Atari 520 STFM x2

  10. Default

    I get mine at my local pharmacy for slightly less.

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