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Thread: 68000 Educational Computer

  1. #1

    Default 68000 Educational Computer

    I recently acquired this computer. From my research I gather that it is a Motorola 68000 sold for educational purposes. Is there a fairly easy way to see if it works? It powers on currently. I am an intermediate computer user, but do not have much experience in this department. I assume that there is a way to connect to it remotely through the rs-232 port? Any help is appreciated.
    IMG_1498.jpgIMG_1491.jpgIMG_1499.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Seattle, WA
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    Can you add a photo showing the entire PCB and one of the EPROM labels? Might be a standard board that I also have one of in a case I haven't seen before.

  3. #3

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    The board itself is the board listed here

    http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/d...omputer-Board/

    Its hard to take pictures of the board because of the way it is mounted and wired. However, it is this same board. I assume the case was custom made?

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    AFAIK Motorola sold these boards without any case. These were the first development boards made by Motorola to demonstrate the new 68000. These were sold from 1981 on when the speed of the new chips just reached 4MHz. The Apple Lisa got 5MHz in 1983, the first Macintosh 8MHz in 1984.

    There are some RS232 drivers called 1488 and 1489. Try to find them and follow the path to the connectors. Connect a serial connection to your PC and try to send <CR> running 9600 8N1 (I guess no hardware handshake). I hope that the monitor program will answer anything if the EPROMs didn't lose their content. I would prefer to copy the EPROMs before starting this board.

    Ralf

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Karlsruhe, West-Germany
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    Meanwhile I found some copies frome BYTE magazine (October 1983):
    "Hardware Review, The M68000 Educational Computer Board
    A look at Motorola's $495, 68000-based single-board computer"
    and the User's Manual (238 pages) including everything you need to have fun

    Ralf

  6. Default

    Oh boy, such a priceless model... It was amazing for its time!

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