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Thread: Toshiba T3200SXC (An LCD Screen rant)

  1. #1

    Default Toshiba T3200SXC (An LCD Screen rant)

    I managed to grab a nice Toshiba T3200SXC off of eBay as an Easter present about a month-and-a-half ago.

    The computer came with its set of usual (and some un-usual) problems:
    • Non-working screen (This I knew was caused by the capacitors. The Sega Game Gear had this problem)
    • Dead CMOS Battery (already fixed with a Radio Shack 2xAA battery case attached to the original wires)
    • Floppy Drive that developed problems after a while (I can make an adapter that goes from 26-pin to 34-pin+power cabling)
    • Light corrosion on the motherboard (cleaned up with a toothbrush and some alcohol)
    • Chipped-off portion of computer's power supply (repaired with epoxy-fiberglass mix and copper-foil trace+phenolic adhesive)


    The system works very nicely, the hard drive still functions as well as it did 26 years ago, it contains a working installation of Windows 3.1, ISA cards work in their intended slots, and I've been able to get some games to run on the system.

    It's a very nice piece of machinery, except for one problem...

    The replacement LCD screens are DAMNED EXPENSIVE. It's a Sharp-branded "LQ10D013" 10.4-inch 640x480 LCD monitor with a dual CCFL backlight.

    I would have been able to fix the screen, except it started falling apart as I attempted to; lifting at least one trace, and damaging one of the polarizing filters with a heat gun (The LCD glass itself is not damaged.). The backlight (with reflector shield+diffuser) is also perfectly functional, as I've plugged it into its inverter and started the computer with it a few times before.

    I know I could just as well use a screen that takes a similar 9-bit signal as the previous screen, but I'm a stickler for originality. If I can, I want a screen that is the same brand and/or uses the same screen electronics as the original. (Such as the "LQ10DH11" or "LQ10D010")

    I can find the screens just fine, it's just the matter of pricing.
    The highest I've been able to find these screens is about $2500.
    The lowest I can find a screen is around $220 if I buy from electronics shops in China. Even THAT is way out of my pricing range.

    I just don't understand. I'm not a businessman nor an economics expert. LCD screens that old don't seem in demand. These particular screens are listed as industrial electronics, but even so. I would not expect screens like that to be sold for prices that are just plain gouging, in my opinion. There seem to be a great number of them, so wouldn't supply dictate the price?
    Last edited by T-Squared; May 22nd, 2017 at 12:08 PM.

  2. #2
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    Many companies list industrial parts but don't stock them. If you place an order they will find one or tell you it is OOS. Some expensive equipment might have used that screen hence the price.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  3. #3

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    Well, what do you know...

    Someone on eBay just happened to be selling the same T3200SXC computer, but for parts as it was damaged!

    It wasn't cheap, but it was much cheaper than the $200+ that other places were asking for, and it seems to have an intact screen. (and I can probably replace components better than before.)



    Why do I always seem to find the damaged/parts counterpart to the computer that I need to repair? It happened twice before.

    • My Compaq Portable III:
      Screen was showing stuck lines, yet I found a system with its screen intact.
      -
    • My Zenith Supersport SX:
      Accidentally blew out the power supply (shorted the power regulator with silver thermal grease), but found a system that had a bad screen, but a repairable power supply.
      -
      and now
    • My Toshiba T3200SXC:
      Screen not working when first bought, but just now found a system with a screen that appears intact. I can also use the rest of the system as spare parts.

  4. #4
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    That's what I look for, cheaper.

    I purchased a Thinkpad T400 recently and found the CCFL was burned out. Replacements screens cost more then what I paid for my unit shipped, ended up buying a dead T61 Thinkpad that has the same screen for $15 shipped and I fixed the T400 (plus have spare parts for my T61 units).
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  5. #5

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    Argh. It seems that I've been scammed. The seller says that Paypal "ate" the money, yet the seller has ignored all attempts to fix this.

    Thankfully I seem to be getting my money back after talking to eBay.

    Well, back to the drawing board, and hopefully I can find a screen or a parts computer in the future...

    In the mean-time, the original screen itself is not damaged beyond repair. (plus the backlight is still in fantastic shape) I CAN repair it, but it will take a bit of time to do so. (Thank goodness for heat guns. They really do well in desoldering board components and multiple contact points at once.)
    Last edited by T-Squared; June 2nd, 2017 at 02:31 PM.

  6. #6
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    (Thank goodness for heat guns. They really do well in desoldering board components and multiple contact points at once.)
    Please don't tell me you were using a heat gun to decap the board. It's almost universally accepted now that twisting them off is less risky than you would expect.
    = Excellent space heater

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    Please don't tell me you were using a heat gun to decap the board. It's almost universally accepted now that twisting them off is less risky than you would expect.
    Nope. Actually, I only used the heat gun to desolder a board that connected to the glass panel through metal contacts like so:

    Control Board--->Metal Contacts--->Flat Flex Cable with Integrated Driver IC--->Glass Panel (No, I did not tear the flat flex cables from the glass panel. THAT would be impossible to fix.)

    I also used the heat gun to melt the adhesive of the polarizing film to make it easier to pull off.
    ---

    I decapped the same board by twisting the old capacitors off and cleaning up around it. Unfortunately, it seems as though the epoxy dissolved on one pad, because as I was trying to reorient one of the capacitors while soldering it down, it tore the pad off and pulled the rest of the trace up with it. (Fortunately, I still have enough copper foil, phenolic tape, and through-hole via rivets to make a repair. The only problem is I don't know if I can make a replacement trace that thin unless I use copper wire. I'll see what I can do.)

  8. #8

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    I feel a bit silly, but better, knowing that Toshiba had an alternate version of this computer with a color DSTN screen. (The Toshiba T5200C, which seems to be even more rare than the T3200SXC: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...-Toshiba-T5200)

    I have failed in repairing the board. The foil trace did not hold, and was torn off while I tried to setup the capacitors.

    However, it's a nice challenge, because I still wish to attempt a repair later and preserve the original monitor by making a new y-axis interface board. I already have components (e.g. etching solution from Radio Shack a year or two ago, and some copper-clad boards on the way.) I can use to make a new layout.

    Thankfully, the board does not have very many components on it, and from what I see, most or all of them could be converted to through-hole replacements.

    IF it does come down to it, I'll be willing to convert to a monitor that is more modern, which I probably will do in the next few days. (I just don't want to wreck the aesthetic of the system, have empty space in the case where it shouldn't be, or have to discard any components, like the backlight inverter board. That's what this whole mess is about.)
    Last edited by T-Squared; June 5th, 2017 at 12:10 PM.

  9. #9
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    You may be interested in this thread I started a while ago. I had replaced the failed screen in my Toshiba T3200SXC with an inexpensive ebay one from China. It's been working fantastic for me. Another member posted a similar project on the thread as well. See here: http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...ent&highlight=

    Oh and BTW, do you have any 2MB SIMMS for this machine to part with?

  10. #10

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    Yeah, I'm doing that, except I have an idea. I have a 3D Printer too, and I'm thinking of making a frame adapter for the new LCD that I bought (i.e. take the LCD, its connected electronics, and the light diffuser out of the frame and put them into the 3D printed one.) based on the Sharp LCD. (I'm actually measuring it.) The backlights look like normal fluoresecent tubes, which I measured too, and I found some on Amazon that may fit. (They're T4-type, and 10.5 inches in length.)

    In short, I'm making my own version of Sharp's LCD, but inexpensively, and with parts that are easy-to-borderline to source. I just got the backlight connectors in today. The fluorescent tubes, LCD and data cable are on their way.

    The only problem I ran into was that the original floppy drive failed (even with maintenance), and experimenting with a 26-to-34-pin adapter didn't work. Although, I think the replacement floppy drive I bought was busted anyways. It kept throwing up a "Not Ready" or "General Failure" error, even on a computer with a working floppy drive, plus I cut a trace on the adapter that I wasn't able to repair. So I'm having to wait for a replacement adapter as well.

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