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Thread: LEDs. What gives?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    You can get LED replacements for bayonet and wedge base signal lamps at most auto stores. We've got them in Amy's 1979 Rabbit diesel, they're about the same brightness, but much less power consumption -- a good thing for the tired old VW wiring harness!
    Yup, I just replaced the instrument panel lamps in my 92 F150. Gives a nice display with the gauge needles actually fluorescing. Note that the wedge-base bulbs are polarity sensitive.

  2. #12

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    About a year ago, the DOT here replaced most of the incandescent traffic light bulbs with arrays of LEDs. Now most of the LED arrays have about 30%-50% of the LEDs out, and they are replacing them with incandescent bulbs. So much for progress.
    Member of the Rhode Island Computer Museum
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by m_thompson View Post
    About a year ago, the DOT here replaced most of the incandescent traffic light bulbs with arrays of LEDs. Now most of the LED arrays have about 30%-50% of the LEDs out, and they are replacing them with incandescent bulbs. So much for progress.
    And in Northern climates, they're now putting heaters in LED traffic lights, because the heat of the bulbs isn't enough to melt the ice and snow.


  4. #14
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    I wonder if adding heaters on LED lamps ends up with a net savings in electricity. Presumably they'd only be run a certain percentage of the year. Probably doesn't save any *money* though, since you're now retrofitting something twice, and there will either be a control system for the heaters or someone will just wire them always-on.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    I wonder if adding heaters on LED lamps ends up with a net savings in electricity. Presumably they'd only be run a certain percentage of the year. Probably doesn't save any *money* though, since you're now retrofitting something twice, and there will either be a control system for the heaters or someone will just wire them always-on.
    I know that when it became apparent in the 50's and 60's that fluorescent streetlights and their ballasts hated cycling in cold north american temperatures some manufacturers sold their lamps with an optional heater. The light sensor was set to turn on earlier than a traditional streetlight but initially only turned a heating element in inside the lamp then a thermostat switched off the heater and turned the lamp on and when the sun came up in the morning the power was turned off and the thermostat reset.
    Not that it mattered much. By the 70's most places were already replacing them with Sodium which was even more efficient.
    = Excellent space heater

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by glitch View Post
    I wonder if adding heaters on LED lamps ends up with a net savings in electricity. Presumably they'd only be run a certain percentage of the year. Probably doesn't save any *money* though, since you're now retrofitting something twice, and there will either be a control system for the heaters or someone will just wire them always-on.
    There's also the factor of accessibility and effort to change the bulbs when they burn out. Given that your typical and properly operating LED will outlast the lifespan of an incandescent bulb, that's less time and effort spent on bulb replacements. Public works departments in towns and cities, for example, would see less time blocking roads just to tend to a problematic or burned out bulb. Money savings not so much a priority, but ease of access could outweigh that.

    Also on the topic of car bulbs, this reminded me of the funny occurrence on many 99-06 GM trucks (GMT800 series) where one DRL will be burned out and the other one will still be lit. Thought it was an uncommon issue until I began actively looking on ones passing on the road and saw that at least 80% of them had this going on. I had one do this to me and narrowed it down to either a power surge upon engine startup or dirty power in the DRL circuit while the truck was running.

    OT, but on the topic of headlights, I recently switched from plastic headlight assemblies to glass ones and am very satisfied with the light output improvement and durability of them - not to mention no more yellowing.
    ~Ian~

    Looking for a Gateway 2000 G6-333 - my first computer.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by DOS lives on!! View Post
    Also on the topic of car bulbs, this reminded me of the funny occurrence on many 99-06 GM trucks (GMT800 series) where one DRL will be burned out and the other one will still be lit. Thought it was an uncommon issue until I began actively looking on ones passing on the road and saw that at least 80% of them had this going on.
    That's almost as common as the Camry Dent.

    http://jalopnik.com/the-incredible-m...ent-1785413530


  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    That's almost as common as the Camry Dent.
    I see this almost daily!

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by DOS lives on!! View Post
    Also on the topic of car bulbs, this reminded me of the funny occurrence on many 99-06 GM trucks (GMT800 series) where one DRL will be burned out and the other one will still be lit. Thought it was an uncommon issue until I began actively looking on ones passing on the road and saw that at least 80% of them had this going on. I had one do this to me and narrowed it down to either a power surge upon engine startup or dirty power in the DRL circuit while the truck was running.
    GM issued a TSB for this if I recall. The circuit driving the burnt out side ran the bulb at a higher voltage then the one on the other side.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by njroadfan View Post
    GM issued a TSB for this if I recall. The circuit driving the burnt out side ran the bulb at a higher voltage then the one on the other side.
    I have a 2002 GMC 1500HD and I have this problem - never stays fixed - thought it was due to water in the light housing so I replaced them both but problem came back- that is when I also noticed it on other GM trucks but not all of them are on the same side which you would think would be the case.

    Jim

    Edit - Thanks for the info that there was a TSB - appears just need to run a different bulb with a higher rating - recommends a 4114K bulb instead of the 3157s.

    Thanks
    Jim
    Last edited by James0555; July 16th, 2017 at 08:02 PM.
    Who let out the magic smoke!!!!!!!!!!!

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