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Thread: Can a laptop CPU work in a desktop?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by yuhong View Post
    At least it did better than the mobile Pentium 4.
    In what way?

    Both the Pentium 4-M and Mobile Pentium 4 had similar and lower TDPs than the Athlon XP-M, and they also had Speed Step. The P4 part was also had better performance and HT in some of the later models.

    The only thing the Athlon XP-M had going was it was generally a cheaper part.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    In what way?

    Both the Pentium 4-M and Mobile Pentium 4 had similar and lower TDPs than the Athlon XP-M, and they also had Speed Step. The P4 part was also had better performance and HT in some of the later models.

    The only thing the Athlon XP-M had going was it was generally a cheaper part.
    Intel chips during the Pentium 4 era frequently ran over their TDP numbers. The Prescott Mobile Pentium 4 with HT was rated at 88 watts but was very difficult to cool in a laptop. Yes, it could be made to work but it spent most of its time throttling to keep from overheating.

    Under load, the actual power consumption of the AMD laptop CPUs was about half of what Intel's Pentium 4 variants used for the same performance. However, Intel was a lot more efficient at idling.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    Intel chips during the Pentium 4 era frequently ran over their TDP numbers.
    CPUs running over their TDP ratings is pretty common because the rating is basically a guesstimate based on a maximum nominal load.

    I've benched several of my Intel and AMD machines and they all go over their TDP ratings in some types of loads, and especially very heavy loads which eat all of the cores and threads.

    An example would be my i5-750 has a TDP of 95W, but it regularly pulled 150W during gaming or map compiles which utilized all four cores.

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