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Thread: Help identifying this USA Hubbell plug off my Vintage Teletype RPE-26 Re-Perforator

  1. #1
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    Default Help identifying this USA Hubbell plug off my Vintage Teletype RPE-26 Re-Perforator

    Hi to all you Americans

    need help please to identify the model number of this Hubbell USA 4 pin power plug off my Vintage Teletype RPE-26 NON-Typing Re-Perforator that was made June 5th 1953

    The outer body is about 2 inches in diameter. 3 of the blades have are shaped, if I recall this allows the plug to twist to lock. The 4th blade is wide flat and has text stamped. "connected to body"

    What I am hoping to get is model number of the plug and more importantly a matching socket, either wall/panel or cord, or at least part numbers.

    Maybe a member here has one kicking around doing nothing.





    This is the Machine. Its a 5 bit code punch





    more images here as I am having to dismantle the machine to replace a bearing and free frozen parts.

    http://imgur.com/a/BaSND

  2. #2

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    It's going to be pre-NEMA, for starters. Looks like it might be a 3-pole plus ground but, I can't be sure. If that wire that looks green was actually blue, I'd guess it was 3 phase.

    We need a useful picture of the pins (preferably a couple or three,from different angles, but definitely one straight on that isn't blurry and crap) along with a photo of the wires, cleaned up so's we can see what colour they are.

  3. #3
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    Looks like an NEMA 18-20 to me. Plug would be a Hubbell 7251C



    120/208V, 3-phase, 20 amp. Not uncommon in commercial environments, even today.

    It could possibly be a NEMA 18-15, but the blade spacing looks wrong

    Curious hookup, as the motor is a single-phase model. I can't tell from the photos, but is the red power lead connected to the chassis?
    Last edited by Chuck(G); August 10th, 2017 at 05:45 PM.

  4. #4
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    Hi all,
    thanks Robert and Chuck.

    I have found a link to the schematic and layout drawings for this RPE 26, on pages 12 and 13 at this link
    There are quite a few motor types available, AC 60hz Governed, AC 25Hz, AC synchronous, and 2 different DC types.
    I have not had time yet to review the drawings to get an understanding on why my unit has a 4 pin plug.

    I think it only uses terminal strip pins 21 (Bk) and 23 (Y) as the active and neutral of the 110v input from the Hubbell.
    terminal strip pin 22 (G) appears to be either an output from the on of switch or may be a power switch bypass input.
    The red wire from the Hubbell plug seems to go to Ground.

    Maybe My best bet for now is to unscrew the wires from the 4 pin Hubbell Plug and just connect then to a temporary terminal strip till I prove the power in circuit with first a multimeter then by connecting 110Vac power

    http://www.rtty.com/development/books/14reperf.pdf

    This is the section of the actual machine wiring. http://imgur.com/uzqCe9e



    This is the schematic of my AC Motor Circuit. and it connects to terminals 13,14,15,16, on base unit, in drawing above
    (( for reference http://i.imgur.com/ydbCoRU.jpg, http://i.imgur.com/c5fYMrr.jpg as both illustrations are shown below





    Also felt it worth adding the signal line schematic circuit here to hopefully aid someone else in the future

    Last edited by inotarobot; August 12th, 2017 at 03:46 AM.

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    If it helps, the standard 3-phase hookup to the plug would be from a wye distribution with XYZ being the respective "hot" phases and the W being the common neutral. So hot-to-hot would be 208V, while hot-to-neutral would be 120V. A lot of data centers and old mainframes use this type of distribution. Note that there's no separate protective ground wire.

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