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Thread: Vintagecomputermuseum Trying A New Scam?

  1. #1

    Default Vintagecomputermuseum Trying A New Scam?

    I think that most Members on this Board know that Seller Vintagecomputermuseum sells misrepresented junk on eBay at inflated prices.

    And I'm pretty sure that most Members here know that Vintagecomputermuseum has more than one eBay Screen Name that they are using (usually only one screen name at a time).

    Recently I noticed that Vintagecomputermuseum is posting some of the same items, using the same ads and photos under two different screen names with vastly different prices at the same time. I suspect that this is being done in an attempt to make some of the prices (the lower of the inflated asking prices) seem more reasonable.

    Look at the items for sale by: Vintagecomputermuseum AND vintage-computer store. You can see that not all of them, but many are the same items, with the same text, and photos, with different pricing.

    I believe that this is a Violation of the eBay terms of Service, BUT the way that the eBay Automated Reporting System is structured, reporting the violation by Vintagecomputermuseum is difficult.

  2. #2

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    I'm not sure reporting them would do any good anyway, That sort of thing has been going on for years, I know / have known seller's to have multiple accounts, Once they get too many negs they stop using that account and use another one, IIRC the negs disappear from feedback after a year anyway, I've never used them and never will, Wrong side of the pond and way out of my price range.

  3. #3
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    The bizarre thing is the pics are exactly the same. If yer gonna run a scam like that.. why not try shots from different angles at least?

  4. #4

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    I've seen this particular bit of asshattery many times. The seller will in fact buy from themselves, paying the e-bay fee so it LOOKS like that's the price people are willing to pay. So long as their e-bay fee over all the 'inflated' sales is lower than the profit for what they sell it to the real customer for, they can drive the market price up artificially.
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  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by deathshadow View Post
    I've seen this particular bit of asshattery many times. The seller will in fact buy from themselves, paying the e-bay fee so it LOOKS like that's the price people are willing to pay. So long as their e-bay fee over all the 'inflated' sales is lower than the profit for what they sell it to the real customer for, they can drive the market price up artificially.
    It is like betting on the market. I've seen this as well. One knows that they originally got the item for next to nothing. Investing a little, and making a sale at below what they'd bought it back for off of ebay can clearly pay.
    It seems like just about all of the sellers that have a large amount of items on ebay are busy pulling one kind or another stunt to make their sale. Ebay hasn't been particularly good about dealing with these cases, other than making it harder for the buyer to prove that the sellers are violating the rules.
    Dwight

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dwight Elvey View Post
    It seems like just about all of the sellers that have a large amount of items on ebay are busy pulling one kind or another stunt to make their sale.
    I don't think that's entirely fair, particularly to sellers of long-tail items. For example, at work we recently sold an HP graphics terminal, with a particular set of options, for $1200. The buyer was a corporation, who either had a use for it or had a customer for it (we didn't care which).

    You might think that that's a lot of money for an old terminal, but that sucker was listed for three and a half years before the right buyer came along. That means my work had the cost of warehousing it for all that time, during which it took up space (those suckers ain't small) that could have been occupied by faster moving items. You have to offset the apparent profit margin by accounting for the fixed costs and the opportunity costs.

    IMHO, this idea that every seller with lots of items is pulling a scam is nonsense. Many are long-tail sellers who fill a vital role. Here's another example: earlier this year, the PBX in the exchange at one of our military bases went down. We had the only NOS replacement part that would get it back up (as in the only one for sale anywhere). Our price reflected the costs of warehousing it until it sold, but was not unreasonable. We didn't gouge them, but we did expedite shipping for them and they were happy. If it hadn't been for "sellers that have a large amount of items on ebay" they'd have been screwed.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by roberttx View Post
    I don't think that's entirely fair, particularly to sellers of long-tail items. For example, at work we recently sold an HP graphics terminal, with a particular set of options, for $1200. The buyer was a corporation, who either had a use for it or had a customer for it (we didn't care which).

    You might think that that's a lot of money for an old terminal, but that sucker was listed for three and a half years before the right buyer came along. That means my work had the cost of warehousing it for all that time, during which it took up space (those suckers ain't small) that could have been occupied by faster moving items. You have to offset the apparent profit margin by accounting for the fixed costs and the opportunity costs.

    IMHO, this idea that every seller with lots of items is pulling a scam is nonsense. Many are long-tail sellers who fill a vital role. Here's another example: earlier this year, the PBX in the exchange at one of our military bases went down. We had the only NOS replacement part that would get it back up (as in the only one for sale anywhere). Our price reflected the costs of warehousing it until it sold, but was not unreasonable. We didn't gouge them, but we did expedite shipping for them and they were happy. If it hadn't been for "sellers that have a large amount of items on ebay" they'd have been screwed.
    While true, ebay is still a goddamn auction site. If you wanna be one of those guys with warehouses of stuff that you're sitting on waiting for the right incident to come along and someone needs that part right now no matter what the cost, go setup your online store ffs. While you diversify the availability of things on ebay you do a damn good job tainting the prices.
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    While true, ebay is still a goddamn auction site. If you wanna be one of those guys with warehouses of stuff that you're sitting on waiting for the right incident to come along and someone needs that part right now no matter what the cost, go setup your online store ffs. While you diversify the availability of things on ebay you do a damn good job tainting the prices.
    Ya wanna spit on the floor and kick the cat, too?

    I'll stick to a couple of facts: 1 - eBay hasn't been primarily an auction site for a long time. 2 - the big box retailers and the China based sellers with their multiple duplicate listings do a lot more harm on ebay than all the surplus brokers put together.

  9. #9

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    There are good sellers and bad. I just seem to often hit the bad ones.
    The one of the last items I bid on in an open auction was out bid at the last day. I chose
    to not bid any more since the starting price was at my limit anyway.
    You might say, OK, someone wanted it more than me.
    The item had been sitting with no bids for more than 6 months. This was a seller with
    over 50 items listed.
    2 weeks later, the same item was back up for bid, by the same seller.
    On another item, I make a reasonably high bid because I'd like to have the item. This is
    another large seller. I see the bid ratcheted up to one minimum bid below my bid and stop. What
    would you think, just a lucky bid, eh? This seller might do better in the lottery with this
    luck. I didn't bid a nice even dollar.
    Earlier when we were at least allowed to see the bid history of buyers, I put a high bid on
    an item that I expect should cover all but the most determined. As before, my bid was ratcheted
    up and in this case, but they don't back out before the close of the auction. I get what they then called
    a second chance at my full bid value. I check on the bidders record. That person only bids on
    items from two people ( I suspect the two are really the same sellers since they are in the same
    location ). The seller sells all kinds of items so it is unlikely that this shill bidder just likes this
    seller. I turn this one in to ebay but watch this seller and bidder, they seem to be doing the same
    to others for months later.
    I've gotten to the point that I just don't bid on things any more. I tend to only do buy-it-now. When I do
    bid, I first look to see if the person is a either a really small seller or sells thousands of items.
    The small sellers don't often know how to cheat buyers. The really large volume ones don't have the time
    to cheat people.
    Maybe it is the type of item I'm bidding on ( not always computer ) but I don't thinks so. I fear that
    Robert, you may be in the minority as a seller on ebay.
    These other types of sellers likely hurt your business. They tend to turn possible buyers away from dealing with
    ebay. Ebay doesn't seem to be interested in doing anything about them.
    As was mentioned, there really isn't much they can do. The seller just registers under another name.
    I've never bid on an item from this one in question, on this thread, because the prices are too inflated for my blood.
    Dwight

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by roberttx View Post
    Ya wanna spit on the floor and kick the cat, too?

    I'll stick to a couple of facts: 1 - eBay hasn't been primarily an auction site for a long time. 2 - the big box retailers and the China based sellers with their multiple duplicate listings do a lot more harm on ebay than all the surplus brokers put together.
    At least the chinese sellers do a good job keeping their prices modestly low. When buddy from upstate starts selling parted out PC's on his ebay page in the hope a pulp mill will pay $3000 for an IBM 5151 replacement it completely f***s up the pricepoint and causes others to overvalue what they perhaps found at Goodwill. Sure it means that if you NEED the part you can then find it from them on ebay but congrats, you have screwed the other 80% of ebay's userbase and completely tampered with the Terapeak statistics.
    I mention Terapeak in there because it DOES show up on their radar. Here is an example.
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