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Thread: Story of my Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus

  1. #11
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    The Pentium OverDrive was mere marketing snake oil. The promise of an OD socket helped Intel push 486 systems out the door as the Pentium hype started. The OD-83 wasn't released until October 1995 by which time any motherboard with an OD socket would be nearing retirement.

  2. #12
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    That, and Intel introduced the Pentium processors in 1993, along with the FDIV bug that was in those CPUs, including the F00F bug.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_FDIV_bug

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentium_F00F_bug
    Current retro systems:
    2x Commodore 64 Breadbin 250407 Rev. B and C
    Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus, aka, the Ultimate Sound Card machine
    iMac G3/600 Graphite, Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger, Lubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
    iMac G4/800 Lampshade, Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger
    YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RetroPCUser

  3. #13
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    And the Pentium OverDrive CPUs were also affected by that bug as well. I'll stick with the DX5-133 (5x86-P75), however, I wish I can find an Aries Voltage Regulator that connects between the CPU and the socket itself.
    Current retro systems:
    2x Commodore 64 Breadbin 250407 Rev. B and C
    Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus, aka, the Ultimate Sound Card machine
    iMac G3/600 Graphite, Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger, Lubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
    iMac G4/800 Lampshade, Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger
    YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RetroPCUser

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    All of the above is true to a point. The OD was a cheap stop gap solution for those who desired the 486 performance but couldn't afford it.
    I think you mean Pentium performance, and neither POD was cheap. The POD-63 launched in January of 1995 for $449, while the POD-83 launched in September of the same year for $299.

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    Think back to the 90's and try to recall that a top end 486 might cost you around 4 to 5 hundred dollars.
    This was true in 1994, but 1995 marked the end of the 486 era. Intel was pushing out new speed grades of Pentium every few months. In an attempt to stay relevant in the market, AMD released the tweaked DX4/5x86 designs to get the 100/120/133 speed grades. Cyrix followed suite and released a cut down version of their 6x86MX core as the 5x86, as well as a couple of DX4s. 486 class processors at this time had their prices slashed since they were in the bottom end of the market and could be had for under $150.

    Had Intel released the POD chips in 1994, they would have been a lot more relevant in the market, but would have also likely been a whole lot more expensive. As it was, the POD-83 had a stacked release right on top of price cuts of lots of older Pentium chips at the end of the year, with Cyrix's 6x86MX and AMD's K5 coming in Q1 of 1996.

    Quote Originally Posted by retro-pc_user View Post
    Some of the games, like Quake, does run better than the DX5-133 processor
    Quake required a Pentium FPU because it was designed around it. The Pentium FPU was pipelined and was a whole lot faster than any 486 class FPU. Programs that made heavy use of the FPU did run better on the POD, but the majority of applications were still integer based.

    Quote Originally Posted by retro-pc_user View Post
    except double the L2 cache than the older Pentium processors and the same amount that's in the MMX CPUs.
    The POD has double the L1 cache, it had no L2 cache on-chip.

  5. #15
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    I meant L1 cache.
    Current retro systems:
    2x Commodore 64 Breadbin 250407 Rev. B and C
    Packard Bell Pack-Mate 28 Plus, aka, the Ultimate Sound Card machine
    iMac G3/600 Graphite, Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger, Lubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
    iMac G4/800 Lampshade, Mac OS X 10.4.11 Tiger
    YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/RetroPCUser

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