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Thread: Valuable / Collectible Early Mac's

  1. #1

    Default Valuable / Collectible Early Mac's

    I'm meeting up with an older gentlemen tomorrow afternoon to check out his collection of older Mac's. He didn't know the models, but said they were the "old box style all in one type" machines from the 80's / early 90's. I'm guessing it's the original Mac / Plus / 128 types, but there may be newer ones.

    He runs the computer department at the local charity thrift store, and holds zero interest or knowledge of the value and/or collectability of older machines. He straight up told me he just throws away anything that comes into the shop that is more than 6 years old. My jaw dropped and told him to keep anything pre-2000, and I'd at least give them $5 for any machine that old, so it's more money to their church.

    He mentioned that he had several old macs in his storage shed, and while I'm not a big Mac guy, he said he was just going to scrap them eventually, so I figured I'd take a look and offer a few bucks for them.


    What should I look for? What models were more collectible? If he'll take 5-10 bucks each, I'll probably grab all of them. Worst case scenario (if none of them work), I can part them out to you guys. I'm hoping there might be a few gems that are salvageable, I'd love to play with an old mac or two.
    Current Vintage Equipment:
    IBM Thinkpad 390, IBM Aptiva A12, IBM PS/2 Model 25-004. Compaq Contura 4/25C.
    Asus P5A-B Socket 7 Box, Tandy 1000RLX-HD "B" & 1200-2FD, VIC20, Zenith ZFL-181-93, Packard Bell 300SX.
    Looking for: 286 Laptop, 386 Laptop, C64. Packard Bell Legend 20CD.

  2. #2

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    Compact-ish Apples that are moderately collectible or interesting
    Macintosh XL (basically a Lisa, which are definitely worth a few bucks these days)
    Macintosh (original 128 with or without '128' on the case)
    Macintosh 512
    Macintosh 512KE
    Macintosh SE/30
    Macintosh Classic II
    Macintosh Color Classic

    Kinda everything but the Mac Plus and the Mac SE, but even those are handy to have for their spare parts - speaking of spare parts, older mechanical keyboards, original mice and disk drives should not be overlooked.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Northfield, MN USA
    Posts
    84

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    If they are really in the <$20 range, I would say grab as many as you can. Like land, they aren't making any more, and you will find buyers at double your money or more depending on model - even for parts machines, unless they've been stored under a leak in the roof, or become mouse houses

    if you can get a list and/or pictures to share, that would be cool.

  4. #4

    Default

    Well, here we go! I gave him $100 for the lot, and he expressed that was more than he was expecting. I still left with a smile.

    I still have to pick up 3 more known working machines from him with monitors (he's clearing off any personal data) - Two Performa 5xx series, and a Macintosh 2 CX (These were included with the price)

    Included Loads of software, a butchered (what looks to be SCSI) DEC Tape Drive (turned into external HDD), and two 8 bit PC Bus Mouse cards as well.

    The pictures include:
    Two Mac Plus
    Two Mac SE
    Apple IIGS
    Parts Performa box (just missing HDD, but supposedly works fine besides that)
    Empty Mac 2 CX box that houses spare cables, modems, and the like.
    Keyboards, Mice.
    Color Stylewriter 1500 Printer
    Spare RAM, Floppy Drives, and more.

    IMG_20171106_143921618.jpgIMG_20171106_143956375.jpgIMG_20171106_144003592.jpgIMG_20171106_144009471.jpg
    Current Vintage Equipment:
    IBM Thinkpad 390, IBM Aptiva A12, IBM PS/2 Model 25-004. Compaq Contura 4/25C.
    Asus P5A-B Socket 7 Box, Tandy 1000RLX-HD "B" & 1200-2FD, VIC20, Zenith ZFL-181-93, Packard Bell 300SX.
    Looking for: 286 Laptop, 386 Laptop, C64. Packard Bell Legend 20CD.

  5. #5

    Default

    He also stated that he has several hard drives and other accessories (keyboards, mice) squirreled away that I can take as well, if he can find them.
    Current Vintage Equipment:
    IBM Thinkpad 390, IBM Aptiva A12, IBM PS/2 Model 25-004. Compaq Contura 4/25C.
    Asus P5A-B Socket 7 Box, Tandy 1000RLX-HD "B" & 1200-2FD, VIC20, Zenith ZFL-181-93, Packard Bell 300SX.
    Looking for: 286 Laptop, 386 Laptop, C64. Packard Bell Legend 20CD.

  6. #6

    Default

    Status update:

    The IIgs works great after I cleaned the floppy heads. It didn't want to boot until I did so. I was able to play a few games on it.

    The two Mac Plus machines both power on, and display a Floppy Icon with a question mark, I'm assuming they're looking for boot media. My contact is still looking for his 3.5" floppies for the macs, so I'm holding out hope I'll be able to play with them soon.

    One of the Mac SE's has some sort of accelerator installed, and displays it on the boot screen, I should have written it down. I can hear a hard drive spin up, but it also just sits on the Floppy Icon with the Question Mark.

    The other Mac SE is a dual 800k floppy unit. Also, Floppy Icon.

    I don't have a monitor to test the Performa 6xxx machine, but I opened it up and it looks pretty clean inside. I powered it on, and was able to open/close the CD drive, but that's about it. When I pick up the next load, I'll be getting two monitors that work on that machine. Looks to take a 50 pin SCSI drive of some sort.

    All of the machines need a good external cleaning. I feel dirty after moving them around. The interiors, however, are near mint.
    Current Vintage Equipment:
    IBM Thinkpad 390, IBM Aptiva A12, IBM PS/2 Model 25-004. Compaq Contura 4/25C.
    Asus P5A-B Socket 7 Box, Tandy 1000RLX-HD "B" & 1200-2FD, VIC20, Zenith ZFL-181-93, Packard Bell 300SX.
    Looking for: 286 Laptop, 386 Laptop, C64. Packard Bell Legend 20CD.

  7. #7

    Default

    I've been playing with the IIgs all night 70% of the discs I received turned out to be moldy, and keep gumming up the heads.

    Is there any way to clean the discs without damaging the material?

    I'm leaving the floppy drive apart until I test all the floppies and sort good from bad, I've had to clean the heads about 15 times so far.
    Current Vintage Equipment:
    IBM Thinkpad 390, IBM Aptiva A12, IBM PS/2 Model 25-004. Compaq Contura 4/25C.
    Asus P5A-B Socket 7 Box, Tandy 1000RLX-HD "B" & 1200-2FD, VIC20, Zenith ZFL-181-93, Packard Bell 300SX.
    Looking for: 286 Laptop, 386 Laptop, C64. Packard Bell Legend 20CD.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    3,383
    Blog Entries
    4

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    Once they are moldy that is it, they're trash. Its easy enough to see on the disk.
    Thomas Byers (DRI)- "You'll have a million people using the A> [MS-DOS prompt] forever. You'll have five million using [nongraphic] menu systems such as Topview, Concurrent PC-DOS, Desq, and those types. But there'll be 50 to 100 million using the iconic-based interfaces."

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zombienerd View Post
    70% of the discs I received turned out to be moldy, and keep gumming up the heads.
    Is there any way to clean the discs without damaging the material?
    Yeah, don't use any abrasive.
    You can use distilled water and run that around the disk, or you could use isopropanol, which is what I use. If you don't care about potentially wrecking the label, you could conceivably douse one or several disks in a tub of warm water and swish around.

    But you gotta stay on that drive head!!!

    Once it gets some grit on it and scratches a track on a disk, that's it: you're done. You'll never recover that track. So when you have known-dirty disks, you need to check very frequently to make sure your head is clean and it's not scratching your disks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    25,218
    Blog Entries
    20

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    I've dealt with mold. It can be done.

    Use distilled water and mild surfactant--you'll have to discard the jacket in any case--there's no cleaning that--just clean the cookie.

    Allow to dry thoroughly Bake at 58C for a day and place in a clean jacket. If there's any squealing, apply a thin layer of cyclomethicone and read immediately.

    You asked.

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