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Thread: Poly 88 case

  1. #71
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    I have a Hakko desoldering station, which I like, but I use Hexacon irons. Still made in the USA, still the same product line as the 1960s If your iron can't handle a double-sided board then it's definitely time for something better -- I used a 15 Watt Rat Shack iron for a long time, growing up, and did a lot of acceptable work with it. Make sure the tip is cleaned and tinned, and like NF6X said, you may need to add fresh solder if the original is badly oxidized.

  2. #72

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    I use a pace soldering/desoldering station, but that is overkill for most hobby users. . .
    Enter My Mind At Your Own Risk!

  3. #73
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    What is the difference between a soldering station and just a soldering iron?

    Side note: I managed to get my tantalum cap from the other board, but I think it may have taken out the through plate 'rivet' as I removed it from the CPU board.. ugh. Anyway, I put the cap into the VTI and plugged in again.. no explosions. So now i need to figure out how to fashion a connector for composite since my case doesn't have one anymore.

  4. #74

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    A good soldering station provides excellent temperature regulation with good transient response. It can supply enough power to maintain tip and joint temperature when soldering something that requires a lot of heat, like large surface pads, large connectors, etc. It has good transient response, so the temperature doesnít plummet when you put the tip on a large thermal mass, and it doesnít overshoot when you remove it from a large thermal mass. A really good station can solder a large connector efficiently, but it also has good enough temperature regulation to go right on to a tiny surface mount component without burning it up (assuming the tip is appropriate for both components). It will be easy to change tips when needed. There will be some way to change the tip temperature, either with controls on the base unit or by swapping tips, so you can use a higher temperature for lead free solder, an intermediate temperature for the good tin/lead stuff, or even a low temperature for soldering sensitive stuff with special solder alloys. The tips will have a plating that the solder will wet, because if the solder beads up on the tip then heat transfer will be poor. The tip plating needs to be tough enough to last for a while, too. Once the plating wears through, the tip is junk. Tips are consumable items. Some stations support accessories like desoldering guns, hot tweezers, etc. I donít like hot tweezers, personally, because they usually have blunt tips with poor alignment. I just use two pencil irons, one in each hand, when I rework 2 terminal surface mount discrete components.

    A soldering iron is a pointy bit attached to a little heating element, with a mechanical thermostat. They have poor temperature regulation, and are usually underpowered for large joints and too hot for small ones. They suck for most tasks.

  5. #75
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    Okay so no life from the VTI. Darn. I think I have the cable connected correctly.. I've got the composite signal wire attached to the pin on the left, and ground to the pin on the right (if you're facing the board). But yeah.. no joy.

  6. #76
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    Checked the MCM6571 with power on.. I get -3.03V on pin 1, +5V on pin 2, and +11.83V on pin 3. I feel like pin 1 should probably be -5v?

    EDIT: -3V is correct according to the manual. Hrmm.

  7. #77
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    Okay.. seems like I may have a problem at IC31 pin 8. According to the schematic we have a signal coming from the shift register at IC35 to pin 9. There seems to be some kind of clock signal there. But nothing coming out of pin 8, which is where whatever comes in on pin 9 should be going out. Bad 7407?

  8. #78
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    Falter, remember that the 7407 is an open-collector device, so the output pins must have a pullup to work. Check the socket also, as well as the power. But 7407s, like all ICs, have been known to fail.


    Quote Originally Posted by NF6X View Post
    A soldering iron is a pointy bit attached to a little heating element, with a mechanical thermostat. They have poor temperature regulation, and are usually underpowered for large joints and too hot for small ones. They suck for most tasks.
    The Weller TCP line uses what I'd call a "mechanical" thermostat--special tips with a slug of metal with a specific Curie temperature, contacted by a magnet connected to some contacts. Elegant and simple.

    I'd still call it a soldering station--one the better time-tested ones.

  9. #79
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    Ok. There's no socket.. most of the TTL chips on this board have been direct soldered.

  10. #80
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    And I've got the concept right, right? What comes in on Pin 9 should be going out on pin 8?

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