Image Map Image Map
Page 4 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 64

Thread: Quick mini rants.

  1. #31

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stone View Post
    Is that supposed to be preformed, by chance?
    Yes, and actually I corrected the spell correction twice but on the third time decided it wasn't worth my time anymore.
    KIMG0005.jpg
    A hashtag.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    25,254
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    To be sure, the musical sharp usually uses purely vertical uprights, but slanted horizontals, mostly to avoid confusion with staff lines. The symbol itself dates from the Middle Ages, when it was used as a means of differentiating a "soft" hexachord from a "hard" hexachord (which is followed by a wandering off into arcane musical theory). Both sharp and flat signs ultimately derive from a lowercase "b". In handwritten scores, I've seen the sharp written as a perfectly perpendicular octothorpe.

  3. #33

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I like to confound people by using the word "octothorpe" instead of "pound sign" or "hashtag". You'd think that if the interest was in brevity, the word "sharp" would be used (as in musical notation). I'm still waiting for someone wondering what all of the "hashtags" are about in a musical score.
    "Octothorpe" was the official Ma Bell name for the # key on your telephone, but no one outside the company ever called it that. When I was a kid in the '80s everyone called it the "number sign". And now for some reason it's the "pound" key even though I've never, ever seen anyone use # as a symbol for pounds. (It's always written "lb(s)." when referring to the unit of weight, or for the British currency.)

    And to be fair, # was a "hash" in C programming decades before Twitter copied the lingo, so they didn't start it.

  4. #34

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vwestlife View Post
    And now for some reason it's the "pound" key even though I've never, ever seen anyone use # as a symbol for pounds.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Number..._North_America
    If you're looking for DS/DD or DS/HD 3" or 5" floppy disks, PM me. I've got some new, used, and factory over-labeled disks for sale.

    There is a crack in everything. That's how the light gets in. -- Leonard Cohen
    ☞ Time flies like an arrow; fruit flies like a banana.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    25,254
    Blog Entries
    20

  6. #36

    Default

    If the two examples of that usage which Wikipedia can find are from 1917 and 1932, then I think that's the reason why I've never, ever any seen anyone use # as a symbol for pounds!

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    25,254
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    I've seen it on handwritten receipts, but generally by older folks. Don't forget the copy editor's symbol "#" meaning "insert a space here".

    We have a lot of strange conventions. Take the measurement for nails; pennies. 10d is a ten-penny nail, even if others call them a 3-inch nail. There are conflicting theories about how the measurement came about. Best one that I've heard is that's what a hundred cost at one time. How many young'uns know that the "d" means "pence" or "pennies"?

    When was the last time that you saw the apothecary's symbol for ounce ()?
    Last edited by Chuck(G); November 29th, 2017 at 05:27 PM.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Walled Lake, MI
    Posts
    2,940
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    When was the last time that you saw the apothecary's symbol for ounce ()?
    May be where the lower case 'z' came about in the ounce abbreviation 'oz'.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    25,254
    Blog Entries
    20

    Default

    The letter "Z" is ancient. It's present in Phonecian, Aramaic, Greek and other alphabets.

    The notion of "ounce" comes from Latin uncia for "twelfth". The old Roman pound "librum" was divided into 12 unciae. The same word is the root of "inch" and "ounce" (recall that there are 12 troy ounces to a troy pound--the troy system of weights is based on the old Roman system). The medieval Italian for "uncia" was "onza", whence the abbreviation "oz."

    A "nail" is 2.25 inches, or half a finger.

    And that's the lesson for today.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Walled Lake, MI
    Posts
    2,940
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    The letter "Z" is ancient. It's present in Phonecian, Aramaic, Greek and other alphabets.

    The notion of "ounce" comes from Latin uncia for "twelfth". The old Roman pound "librum" was divided into 12 unciae. The same word is the root of "inch" and "ounce" (recall that there are 12 troy ounces to a troy pound--the troy system of weights is based on the old Roman system). The medieval Italian for "uncia" was "onza", whence the abbreviation "oz."

    A "nail" is 2.25 inches, or half a finger.

    And that's the lesson for today.
    Gee, I hope I don't have to stay after class and pound the erasers.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •